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Photography

Timothy Saccenti

Posted by Alex Bec,

Over the last three years Timothy’s (already fantastic) work has elevated to new levels, incorporating more motion work, but losing none of its previous magic. With this progression comes a natural change of approach and presentation, and because of that our eyes have been treated to a brand new site, for all the right reasons – to show his work off to the heights it deserves. Enough from me – Timothy let us know a little bit more about his work, and why the new site is in place…

Hey Tim, new site is looking very interesting – why the change of navigation?

I’m extremely happy with the new site, Build and Ben from Antenna did an amazing job of making me look good. This is timothysaccenti.com version 3, with Build having designed the previous two sites as well. The site previous was designed 3 years ago when I was concentrating more on still photography and hadn’t moved into the motion direction world yet. Reflecting that, the site wasn’t built to optimize the motion experience, and in addition to that in the last 3 years there have been amazing strides in what is possible, video wise, in the web viewing world. Technicalities aside we all felt it was time to evolve my web presence and working with Build and Ben was logically the way to move forward.

There’s a real mix of work on there, what do you think make your photos/films your own?

That’s a curious question to answer but I’d say it’s the process I use. Basically I try to not come into a situation with a preconceived idea of a specific technique or lighting look etc. I try to immerse myself into the situation, assess the best way to communicate the message, then execute using the most appropriate materials. It’s more of a creative direction method rather than a decisive moment type approach I’d say. Each project is built from the ground up and all the elements, crew, styling, location, etc are chosen very carefully over the process. Because of that I usually oversee all the post production as well, which isn’t necessarily how commercial projects are run. Often the director hands over the footage after a shoot and the post production, editing, coloring, effects, music etc, are handled by the agency with little director input. But with my team we try to be involved with the post production as much as possible and keep the projects more ‘director led’. I think that part, more than anything else, is probably what makes my photos and/or films feel like ‘Timothy Saccenti’ pieces. At every stage in the process we are debating what the appropriate response is and keeping an eye on the details..

If you had to choose between doing just stills or just motion for the rest of your life, which would you go for?

Well, motion is basically 24 (or 30 depending on where you are) still frames per second so I’d probably say motion. Motion work, to me, combines the most elements of human consciousness of any art form and comes closest to capture the human experience through sound, light, the manipulation of time etc.. Also the team collaboration on a film project is extremely rewarding, there is so much to learn from the varied artists you collaborate with as the director and that to me is what It’s all about. I still love the simplicity and immediate gratification of the still photo though, the process is very immediate compared to the protracted gestation time of a standard short film which may take 6 months to finish…so hopefully I wont have to make that choice anytime soon.

What are you working on at the moment?

We have a short film we created that ties into our Garden series that is currently being scored. It’s collaboration with Flying Lotus for Warp records. In addition we’ve just finished a print and TV commercial for the watch company Bulova which should be airing soon and a few other personal and client based print and motion projects on the horizon so watch this space for updates in the near future.

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Posted by Alex Bec

Alex is one of the directors of It’s Nice That who now oversees our sister creative agency INT Works. For several years he oversaw the Monday Morning Music Video feature until it came to an end in 2014.

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