• Argero

    Andy Rementer’s work at the gallery

Art

Golly gouache – new Andy Rementer show opens in the Netherlands so we spoke to the man himself

Posted by Rob Alderson,

Andy Rementer may be an artist, an illustrator and a gentleman. But more than all of that, he’s a joy-monger. If you can look at his work without smiling you’re probably dead inside. His new show at the Ship of Fools gallery in The Hague promises to be a bobby-dazzler, with a series of gouche portraits, plants and typography work. Nice indeed.

Hi Andy.One of your drawings was in a group show at this gallery in 2009 how does it feel to be back with your own show?

I’ve been a fan of the Ship of Fools Gallery since discovering them. They have always been supportive of my work, and I love the spirit of what they do. Having a solo show here is a great opportunity to interact with them and the space directly. 

What can people expect from this exhibition?

I created new gouache paintings for this show – a mix of portraits, typography and plants. Gouache is a very vibrant medium, so the nature of it helps bring a new dimension to my art. There are also going to be some large scale characters on the gallery walls.

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    Andy Rementer: New work

Do you enjoy the processes involved preparing for a show?

Preparing for a show is always challenging but fun. Naturally I like to create new pieces when given the possibility to display something, this keeps me fresh and motivated. 

I also try to create something unique for each event. For ‘Going Places’ a new screen print and RISO print will be available. About the installation process, it can be involved sometimes, but definitely worth it. 

You’re no stranger to Europe having lived in Italy for a time – what influence did that period have on your art?

Living in another country is eye opening and incredibly enriching. It’s easy to get influenced by the culture and local heritage. Living in Italy, of course my eyes were inundated by inspiration, from medieval art to crazy 80s store signs. I think much of that experience has fed into the development of my visual language.

Is there a difference between the ways European and American audiences react to your work?

I get a wonderfully warm and welcoming response from Europe. I feel very lucky for this, and am happy to share my work with this thriving creative community. There seems to be a spirit of collaboration and participation that is hard to find anywhere else. The American audience is very supportive too, maybe in a different way, but there is a balance.

What’s the hardest thing about what you do?

Making it all fit into 24 hours.

The exhibition runs until May 11.

  • Andy_2

    Andy Rementer: New work

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    Andy Rementer: Signs

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    Andy Rementer: World

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    Andy Rementer: Plant

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    Andy Rementer: Faces

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    Andy Rementer working in The Ship of Fools

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Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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