• Lawrence-zeegan

    Bookshelf: Lawrence Zeegen

Graphic Design

Bookshelf: Lawrence Zeegen

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

Lawrence Zeegen is an educator, illustrator and writer. As Head of the School of Communication Design at Kingston University he leads teaching and research in graphic design, illustration, animation and photography at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He is a regular contributing illustrator for The Guardian newspaper and has written 5 books on contemporary illustration. Recently appointed to Icograda’s Executive Board, as the only UK member, he presents a paper on design writing at the Icograda Spring 2011 conference in Vilnius, Lithuania this week.

Design for the Real World Victor Papanek

First published in 1971, translated into numerous languages and never out of print, I came across this book for the first time in 1982 while a student on the Art and Design Foundation Course at Basingstoke Technical College. This book was a revelation – here was a designer and educator that believed in the responsibility of design – ‘design has become the most powerful tool with which man shapes his tools and environments’ he wrote. As a young design student I cared passionately, and continue to do so, about good design looking good – Papanek taught me, through this book, that ‘only a small part of our responsibility lies in the area of aesthetics.’ I am guilty of putting form before function from time to time but through Papanek, with an awareness of my responsibilities. If you only read one book on design – this is it.
www.wikipedia.org/Victor_Papanek
www.amazon.co.uk/design-for-the-real-world…

The Question and Answer Book of Everyday Science Ruth A. Sonnborn

By the time that I received this book, published in 1961 as a gift from my parents in 1970, I was six years old. To say that Robert J. Lee’s illustrations relating to ‘The Sky and the Outdoors’, ‘Fire and Heat’ ‘Things You Use’ and ‘Machines that Work for You’ set me on a path that would start with a BA in Graphic Design at Camberwell and an MA in Illustration at the RCA through the 1980s before making an career as an illustrator might sound far-fetched. Find a copy of this book and see for yourself – truly inspirational illustrations. The book did nothing for my interest in the sciences – I failed O level Physics and Chemistry – able to draw the diagrams, unable to comprehend what they meant.
www.amazon.co.uk/question-and-answer-book-of-everyday-science

Strand – For the Stamps of the World – Stamp Album Stanley Gibbons

Grandma and Grandpa Zeegen gave me this stamp album as a birthday present in 1971 and I filled it with stamps from across the world, though mainly from communist countries as my uncle, Maurice (Mod) Zeegen, worked for the Communist Party in Prague and sent me bags of stamps collected from the mail delivered to the party headquarters. My favourite stamps, at the time, were a set from San Marino of Disney characters – left wing Mod was a touch disappointed, of that I’m sure. Stamp collections have always fascinated me – I was asked to design a set of stamps for the Royal Mail straight after my graduation from the RCA and this was the book I turned to for inspiration.
www.stanleygibbons.com

Here is New York A Democracy of Photographs Various

You’ve seen this book. ‘Seeing in not only believing. Seeing is seeing.’ wrote Michael Shulan in the intro to this chilling collection of 9/11 photographs. Felix Zeegen, aged 11, pulls this book out of the bookcase every visit he makes to stay with me in London. He sits transfixed for hours asking every question imaginable about that day a decade ago. With Osama bin Laden captured and killed last week Felix’s questions have intensified – this book of a 1000 photographs of the 5000 photographs taken by 3000 photographers, and consequently exhibited, gives visual meaning to his questions. This is the largest photographic archive in world history devoted to a single event.
www.hereisnewyork.org
www.amazon.co.uk/here-is-new-york

Mini London A-Z Street Atlas & Index

Before the iPhone people used the A-Z. As a cycle dispatch rider, to earn some much-needed cash throughout the mid-1980s the A-Z was my bible. At that time I knew nothing of its origins but later discovered the history. Phyllis Pearsall had set out for a party in Belgravia on a wet night in 1935 but having used a 16-year old map to navigate her journey she arrived very late and very wet. A year later she had created the first A-Z. Before satellite imaging or much aerial photography, Pearsall had walked 3,000 miles during 18-hour days mapping the 23,000 streets of 1930s London. Pearson was an artist, before anything else, and the project was intended to fund her passion. Rejected by publishers, she printed 10,000 copies and sold them directly to WH Smith. Choosing the name A-Z from the index – the publication was a hit. The ultimate artist’s book.
www.a-zmaps.co.uk
www.amazon.co.uk/london-a-to-z

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Art View Archive

  1. List

    Swedish creative Henrik Franklin is a designer, illustrator and animator with two of the world’s leading design schools (Konstfack in Sweden and Rhode Island School of Design) sparkling on his CV. Invited to showcase his considerable talents in Anna Lidberg’s Gallery 1:10 – “the miniature gallery for contemporary art” – Henrik produced a table of tiny tomes and the attention-to-detail on each cover design is really impressive.

  2. Main

    Victoria Siddall has worked at Frieze for just over a decade and two years ago was made Director of Frieze Masters. Excitingly, just a few weeks ago she was appointed Director of Frieze Masters, Frieze New York and Frieze London. As well as being one of the most powerful women in the art world, Victoria is also my sister, so I was curious to find out how she’s feeling on the dawn of her new career.

  3. List

    The Turbine Hall at the Tate Modern has an incredible presence when it’s void of installations, which is what’s so wonderful about the huge enclosed space. As much as I admire the vast emptiness though, it’s even more exciting when a piece of work is placed in the hall and interrupts the vacuum. Opening today, American sculptor Richard Tuttle is the latest commissioned artist to show his work in the space and his 24ft sculpture certainly makes an impact.

  4. Main2

    I came across the work of Matthias Geisler over on Booooooom the other day and was reminded that we hadn’t posted something like this in a while. Matthias’ work is a swirling blend of spirits and creatures that are created with meticulous use of pencil crayons and water-colours. Is it me or are watercolours real in at the moment? All the cool kids seem to be using them.

  5. 8

    A kind of magic happens when Seth Armstrong puts brush to canvas. Having only been familiar with his work for the Mr Porter Journal, I became instantly bewitched by his paintings when clicking through his website.

  6. List

    Whatever the some naysayers may claim there is an art to collage and not everyone can do it, despite how good you think your teenage collages of cut-out red lips, Leonardo DiCaprio and puppies were. Anthony Zinonos is the perfect example of this, having featured on the site previously he’s updated his portfolio with some really cool bits and bobs.

  7. List

    There’s something very fun and raw about Jessica Hans’ vases and her approach to ceramics in general. Based in Philadelphia, she’s had a longstanding interest in foraging and raw materials since university; this has carried over into her ceramics work, which in the past has seen her driving to clay sites, digging her materials out of the ground and then firing them in their original state to see what would happen.

  8. Listt

    “To be an artist and for anyone to care vaguely about what you do is a great thing,” says street artist Moose in this fascinating new Nissan campaign, but his work is more important than most. As the inventor of reverse graffiti – whereby he uses a high-powered pressure washer to stencil imagery in the dirt that accumulates in our cities – Moose’s work asks questions about our attitudes to pollution in a very creative way.

  9. List

    To stare into a Danny Fox painting is like waking up in a world written by Charles Bukowski on a particularly heavy bender. There’s sex and drinking and guns, plus boxers and strippers and cowboys; here a horse, there a tiger. It’s intense and unnerving and exciting, but although there’s something very contemporary about Danny’s paintings, his rise to prominence owes a great deal to the support of a more well-established artist (an age-old route for up-and-coming artistic stars).

  10. Listjmp_cg_house_float_10

    Heads are turning in Covent Garden this morning, and they’re not just looking at the usual street performers – they’re gawping at a levitating building. Master of illusions Alex Chinneck’s latest mind-boggling public art installation is on show in what must surely be the spiritual home of his craft; one of the busiest piazzas in London and its theatrical hub. His floating building follows on from a sliding house, upside down house and many other puzzling optical illusions.

  11. List

    Back in 2013 designers Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman launched 40 Days of Dating, where they entered into a seven week relationship with each other to explore the world of romance from a creative perspective.

  12. Main

    Switzerland-based artist Pascale Keung makes delightfully diverse work which is inspired by her chosen country’s stunning natural landscape as often as it is by wild fantasies. This series Muttsee is an example of the former, a collection of images about “a very special place in the Alps of Switzerland” where she goes to fish with her friends from time to time.

  13. List

    Anna Burns is a set designer with a taste for the ambitious. Who could forget her work with Thomas Brown where they created B-Movie inspired installations out of flammable umbrellas? For her latest work Anna has collaborated with Michael Bodiam on a series inspired by nuclear catastrophe and our contradictory attitudes towards it – apocalyptic fear on the one hand and weird fascination on the other.