• Bookshelf-final
Bookshelf

The top five books of POST magazine’s Louise Benson

Posted by Madeleine Morley,

Louise Benson from POST Magazine has curated a selection of books from her bookshelf for us! Since we first wrote about POST in 2011, the digital magazine dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge creativity has spectacularly grown, and has become a very intriguing and forward-thinking online platform. The site explores the blurring boundaries between art, fashion, science and technology, and in the past they have published iPad editions of their magazines. For an afternoon, Associate Editor Louise pulled herself out of the digital realm and spent some time with her physical bookshelf. On to Louise for her list of all time favourites.

  • 1-curious-01

    Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

  • 1-curious-02

    Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

  • 1-curious-03

    Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

  • 1-curious-04

    Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

  • 1-curious-05

    Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

Vilgot Sjoman: I Am Curious (Yellow)

This has it all, really. A pair of young Swedish lovers, protests and politics, nude yoga, and a cameo from Martin Luther King. Released in 1967, it was initially censored in parts of America, but overall brought in a new acceptance of sex and nudity on screen in films not restricted to pornographic cinemas. I found an old VHS copy of the film knocking around in the grubby and wonderful Notting Hill Exchange film shop when I was about 16. It really shaped my fondness for non-linear ways of filmmaking, where the story itself is less important than the ways of telling it. A couple of years later, I found this accompanying book and knew that I had to buy it.

  • 2-tantra-01

    Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

  • 2-tantra-02

    Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

  • 2-tantra-03

    Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

  • 2-tantra-04

    Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

  • 2-tantra-05

    Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

Frank Andre Jamme: Tantra Song

Tantric practitioners anonymously produced these paintings on used paper as a form of meditation in Rajasthan, India. They would then discard them, never laying claim to them as artists. It was all about the freely spiritual process, which is maybe what makes the collected results so strikingly beautiful. Their bleeding edges, block colours and simple shapes seem strangely prescient of spare modernist compositions. Beautifully restrained.

  • 3-cat-01

    Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

  • 3-cat-02

    Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

  • 3-cat-03

    Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

  • 3-cat-04

    Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

  • 3-cat-05

    Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

Bruce Angrave: Tripli-Cat

Endless cat-themed puns and monochrome illustrations, anyone? To be honest, the puns are terrible and the drawings are repetitive, but good on Bruce Angrave for picking a theme and running with it. He’s pretty much run a marathon with it, and I’d definitely say that he won that race. His warped, feline-filled world never fails to make me laugh.

  • 4-players-01

    Tina Barney: Players

  • 4-players-02

    Tina Barney: Players

  • 4-players-03

    Tina Barney: Players

  • 4-players-04

    Tina Barney: Players

  • 4-players-05

    Tina Barney: Players

Tina Barney: Players

New Yorker Tina Barney’s photographs of her wealthy family and friends are kind of surreal, while at the same time managing to pick up very ordinary details. In her portraits, stuffy sofas and badly fitting shoes are captured in vivid, beautiful colours. She seems to catch the feeling of slightly awkward family gatherings, or those brief odd moments of self-reflection you sometimes get in the middle of a crowded party. Her mix of fashion and fiction, drama and documentary, really push my ideas of what style can be, and show how photography can be both posed and naturally relaxed.

  • 5-procktor-01

    Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

  • 5-procktor-02

    Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

  • 5-procktor-03

    Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

  • 5-procktor-04

    Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

  • 5-procktor-05

    Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

Patrick Procktor: Patrick Procktor

Dreamily distorted watercolours, lazy afternoon portraits, delicately painted still lifes of nothing much… these sum up Patrick Procktor’s work for me. His friends and contemporaries included David Hockney, Derek Jarman and Francis Bacon, and collectively they were frequently in the spotlight as the up-and-coming creative generation of the 1960s. It’s quite strange now to look back, as he was also my step-grandfather, and came to live and work at our house for a time while I was growing up. Just imagine if the close friends of your twenties ended up reaching the heights of Hockney, while your own work falls slightly under the radar. I love the indistinct, evocative quality of his watercolours though, with a few simple brush strokes conjuring each scene.

Oo-xtcya

Posted by Madeleine Morley

Madeleine joined It’s Nice That as a freelance editorial assistant in May 2014 having graduated from Cambridge University where she edited the student newspaper. In the autumn of 2014 she will begin her Masters course at The Courtauld Institute of Art where she will specialise in architecture.

Most Recent: Bookshelf View Archive

  1. List

    John Tebbs is an English gardener who, frustrated by the fact that “many of his working days are held hostage to the weather” founded The Garden Edit in the winter of 2013. His idea was to spend his downtime as productively as possible, creating an online store of beautiful objects which he sourced and sold himself. The resulting curated collection reflects John’s faultless aesthetic, selling “minimal, well-designed products from craftspeople, artists, publishing houses and family-run businesses” alongside a Journal which features short articles by some of his favourite figures about their own horticultural escapades, from rooftop gardens to illustrations of plants.

  2. Main1

    Want to know a surprising secret about self-proclaimed “book obsessive” and Dazed & Confused editor Isabella Burley? She can’t stand big coffee-table-sized fashion books. “I’ve always taken my references from art, pop culture, photography and sex zines rather than fashion,” she told us. “That’s really come to shape the way I approach our fashion content within Dazed.”

  3. List

    With 25 years experience in magazine design, not to mention eight years of covering the extensive subject under the title magCulture, it’s a wonder we haven’t already metaphorically burst into Jeremy Leslie’s house and insisted he share his five favourite examples of printed matter right then and there. Instead, we caught him in the build up to The Modern Magazine 2014, the conference which takes place annually in the midst of London Design Festival to shine a torch on the current state of editorial creativity, as well as new directions for the industry.

  4. List

    Danielle Pender is the brain at the helm of Riposte magazine, one of the most exciting new publications created to champion the women doing exciting work in the creative industries today, as well as working at KK Outlet, the London outpost of communications agency KesselsKramer, so can you blame us for wanting to have a poke about her bookshelf? Her selection gives a generous insight into the process behind putting together a magazine, from the issue of National Geographic which led her and Riposte’s creative director Shaz Madani to consider a text-based front cover for the magazine (“I’m really happy we had the balls to go with it”) and the all-time hero she dreams of interviewing, with a few other gems thrown in for good measure. She technically stretched her five books to seven, but we let her off because they’re all so damn interesting.

  5. Main

    I always had a hunch that Bruno Bayley was the kind of guy with a great bookshelf – you can just tell that he’s a hoarder of the weird, the kind of person who would rather stumble upon someone’s diary in a forest than, say, a suitcase full of cash. London-based Bruno is the European managing editor of Vice, which allows him to take his curiosity for the dark corners of the world and pump them out to those who want to know but perhaps can’t be bothered to look. His articles are some of the best on Vice at the moment, so go and check them out after you’ve read his deeply interesting, peculiar top five books. Excuse us while we go and subscribe to the Fortean Times

  6. List

    London-based photographer Catherine Losing is exactly our cup of tea; working with the crème de la crème of collaborators from set designers to food stylists, she takes photographs which are colourful, dynamic, bold and immediately recognisable. Unsurprisingly then, her bookshelf is among the very best-stocked of them all, complete with Martin Creed, Barbara Hepworth and Toilet Paper magazine, and most importantly they’re all seriously well-thumbed and chockablock with Post-its.

  7. Listdie-tollen-hefte-01

    When you ask a couple of creatives who work in a former kindergarten in east Berlin (as we learned in an interview many moons ago) to show you their book collection, you hope to see some pretty cool and quirky publications. Doris and Daniel of Golden Cosmos have not let us down.

  8. New_list_animade

    Design and animation are maybe a bit overlooked when it comes to selecting people whose bookshelves we’d like to share with you. With that in mind this week’s collection comes from the very lovely folks at interactive design and animation studio Animade. They recently incorporated Hover Studio into their midst too, making them collectively one of our favourite groups of creative brains in a five mile radius. Their bookshelf has a serious digital and animation lean, so budding animators and interactive designers, gather round to find out the tomes that’ll yield the secrets of your trade.

  9. List

    When we received a copy of illustrated sine Steak Night through the door a couple of weeks ago (check it out in Things here) we were pleasantly surprised to find that Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke is not only a musician, but a keen writer too. Intrigued, we hunted him down and grilled him about his Bookshelf, which turns out to be an incredibly well-stocked selection of graphic novels and comic books, with a little photography thrown in too. He’s multi-talented and he’s got great taste! Here’s Kele telling us about his choices.

  10. Main5

    I get the same feeling receiving the zip file from weekly Bookshelf contributors as I did when I used to babysit as a teenager and casually rifle through people’s drawers (by the way, don’t do that). Witnessing the telling spines residing on people’s shelves will always be intriguing, and Holly’s top five is no exception. The editor in chief of i-D has an absolute terasure trove of some of the glossiest, coffee table-worthy tomes money can buy. What’s brilliant about her selection is just how telling it is of her true passion for the world she has been submerged in since beginning as an intern there many moons ago, and of why i-D is so consistently brilliant with her at the helm.

  11. Main

    The amount of times we’ve checked out new work from Joe Cruz at It’s Nice That and just sat around with our heads in our hands, gobsmacked at how simple and effortlessly beautiful his work is. Not just that, but his style is probably one of the most easily recognised of the editorial illustrators we chat about here. We love him so much that we even asked him to illustrate a piece in our own magazine, Printed Pages. Here’s Joe on the artists, books and African fashion that have influenced his work over the years. Take it away, Joe!

  12. Bookshelflist

    Louise Benson from POST Magazine has curated a selection of books from her bookshelf for us! Since we first wrote about POST in 2011, the digital magazine dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge creativity has spectacularly grown, and has become a very intriguing and forward-thinking online platform. The site explores the blurring boundaries between art, fashion, science and technology, and in the past they have published iPad editions of their magazines. For an afternoon, Associate Editor Louise pulled herself out of the digital realm and spent some time with her physical bookshelf. On to Louise for her list of all time favourites.

  13. Main

    Reel off a list of highly-publicised albums recently and chances are that their artwork was designed by creative director and artist, Leif Podhajsky. From Bonobo to Mount Kimbie and Kelis to Tame Impala, Leif’s psychedelic-inspired designs turn these albums from listenable into incredibly desirable in a matter of seconds. Drawing inspiration from the mystic, the kaleidoscopic, the mysterious and the wild, Leif’s site and blog are a treasure trove of beautiful, technicolour work to marvel at. You can almost smell the sandalwood. Here he is on his top five most inspirational tomes, check out that National Geographic collection!