• Mari10

    Bookshelf: Peter Marigold

Graphic Design

Bookshelf: Peter Marigold

Posted by Rob Alderson,

Designer Peter Marigold burst onto the scene in the mid-2000s, shooting to prominence with his Make/Shift freestanding shelves which were hailed an instant design classic. Most recently he took part in Methods of Imitation as part of The London Design Festival, and we are delighted to take a tour of the five tomes that mean the most to him for this week’s Bookshelf.

Dictionary of Word Origins John Ayto

I’m obsessed with the origin of words and I have a lot of books about them, as well as persistently looking them up online. I like the fact that words are like seeds, they look like compact, complete things, but they carry history as data within themselves. I love the English language for its complexity of origin, and this is the best book to tell the many stories buried within each word. Even though it’s a dictionary, I’ve read it like a book from cover to cover many times. I’ve bought it several times as a present for people in the past but do not seem able to find it online anymore, not even second hand!
www.amazon.co.uk/dictionary-of-word-origins
www.harpercollins.com/dictionary-of-word-origins

1984 George Orwell

I guess everyone is a little embarrassed of their teenage years, the music they listened to, clothes they wore. This was the book that shaped my pre and early teenage years and I read it obsessively many times. Maybe I had a real twisted world vision, but when I was younger I thought it was a textbook on how to run a better society, completely missing the point of why George Orwell wrote the book. It generated a profound level of paranoia within my daily life, which for some weird reason I did not think was a problem. So I buried it for many years, until recently when my friends (Study O Portable) mentioned the sections on the rewriting of the English language within the book and I picked it up again. It’s still a good book, and I think of it fondly, even though it’s a dark vision.
www.amazon.co.uk/nineteen-eighty-four
www.penguin.co.uk/1984

If This is a Man Primo Levi

This is one man’s story of surviving Auschwitz. It is maybe the book that took me the longest to read because I cried continuously over every page. It is the only account of the Holocaust that I have read that conveys some of the reality of the slow death of so many of the people there. Whereas we are familiar with the instant judgements that sent people to the gas chambers, this book describes the endless daily grinding down of men into dust through forced labour. It changed my perception of everything in the world and I believe it should be mandatory for children to learn in school. I have not picked it up to read again since the first time.
www.amazon.co.uk/if-this-is-a-man
www.wikipedia.org/if-this-is-a-man

The Illusion of Conscious Will Daniel Wegner

I have always been intrigued as to how our minds work. All animals, including humans, spend their lives under a bizarre spell that causes them to believe that they are responsible for their actions. It’s impossible to shake off as it is hard-wired into our physical brains. The author of this book analyses thorough many experiments how this illusion forms a fundamental part of our mind’s make up. I believe understanding this is one of the key ways to understand the nature of life on this planet, and our relationship to all things living.
www.amazon.co.uk/the-illusion-of-conscious-will
www.mitpress.mit.edu/the-illusion-of…

150 Essential Jigs, Aids & Devices V J Taylor

I have many books on workshop jigs and techniques, and this just happens to be the first one that I bought. I’ve spent many hours reading and re-reading things like this. I like the idea that you can equip your mind for very specific moments in the workshop, so when you are making things you can drag pieces of information out of your head almost like a second tool box. These books never really go out of date, even if the tools change slightly. I’ve maybe used only a fraction of the jigs detailed in the book, but, to me, they are there in my mind to use should the occasion arise.
www.amazon.co.uk/150-essential-jigs-aids-and-devices
www.davidandcharles.co.uk

Ra

Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Art View Archive

  1. Samchirnside-int-list

    I don’t know what it is about seeing colours up close that’s so mesmerising, but Sam Chirnside is all over it. The Melbourne and New York-based artist works predominantly with oil paints to create strangely beautiful distortions, which work best when overlaid with a band logo to create album artwork, or cut out in geometric shapes. His works resemble planetary compositions straight out of a senior school physics textbook or a happy spillage in an art classroom, and we can’t get enough of them.

  2. Jacksmith-npg-int-list

    For the first time ever a show at the National Portrait Gallery in London contains no human faces. Jack Smith: Abstract Portraits which opened late last week is the first exhibition in the gallery’s 159-year history that includes no figurative portraits as Smith’s work is made up of abstract shapes and colours. Of course there’s nothing new about the idea of a portrait being something other than a traditional head and shoulders painting, but it is noteworthy that one of London’s leading galleries should take such a decisive step.

  3. Benjamin-dittrich-int-list

    German graphic artist Benjamin Dittrich is principally concerned with scale at both a micro and macro level. He preoccupies himself with subjects as large as the cosmos and as minute as molecular structures, zooming in and out in his textural works to reveal vast and complex systems. His retro-futuristic work is breathtakingly complex, utilising painted and printed layers to launch you though time and space. He’s got a new show opening at Spinnerei Archiv Massiv tonight in Leipzig, which if you’re based nearby we’d urge you to get down to. Utterly beautiful stuff!

  4. Chyrumlambert-port-2-int_copy

    Los Angeles-based artist Chyrum Lambert uses formal constraints like grid systems and scalpel blades to contain and compose his paintings made up of cut-and-paste figures, patterns and abstract narratives.

  5. Blamey-ct-6-int

    David Blamey, the artist who founded publisher Open Editions, has authored the first release from Continuous Tone, a series of sound works that treat the medium as a viable space for the production of art.

  6. Nathalie-due-pasquier-int-list-3

    Nathalie Du Pasquier is a figure who seems to leave a trail of intrigue behind her everywhere she goes. This is largely because, as a founding member of the Memphis group (an Italian design and architecture group founded in Milan in 1981) she’s been an unstoppable force in shaping the design world as we know it, colours, angles, ideas and all. But it’s also partly because her work is just so much fun.

  7. Escape-to-destiny-1mehdi-ghadyanloo-int-list

    Merging the style of the early 20th Century surrealists with contemporary street art, Tehran-based artist Mehdi Ghadyanloo’s work is strange and beguiling. He’s currently in London, busying himself with the mammoth task of creating murals all around the capital, including one measuring a whopping 3.4km. As if that wasn’t enough, he’s also showing at the Howard Griffin Gallery in London, in an exhibition entitled Perception.

  8. List

    Highbrow folk like us often find the traditional emoticon can struggle to express how we really feel. We don’t ALWAYS want to convey that we’re blindly happy, crying with laughter or horizontally-lipped and nonplussed. Sometimes, we need something a little more creative. Thank the lord, then, that Hyo Hong has come up with just the solution, in the form of the multifaceted (in its truest sense) Cindy Sherman-icon.

  9. Art-belikov-int-list

    I can’t tell you a whole lot about Lithuanian artist Art Belikov other than he’s 24 years old and, er, Lithuanian. And that all his images are fantastical digital creations. But in spite of the lack of background information currently available to me I’d just like to say that his work is extraordinary. He’s a maker of 3D rendered images depicting scenes borrowed from late 90s sci-fi; all “vintage” cell phones and games consoles, cans of mysterious energy drinks and designer bottled water. There’s a 666 in his URL too so you can be sure he’s a cool guy! When we finally track the man down we’ll ask him some questions about what it all means, but for now just drink in the eerie beauty of his digital creations.

  10. Jessica-brilli-int-17

    If when you close your eyes at night you dream of tying a silk kerchief over your carefully curled ’do and hopping in a classic Chevy to sail down the West Coast, you might find yourself as enamoured as I do with the work of painter Jessica Brilli. She favours endless-seeming roads and vintage cars for her expressive oil paintings, and she’s got recreating them on canvas down to a fine art. Her landscapes are dream-like in their expansiveness and colour palette, while her portraits seems to hark back to an era when a Chevy was still commonplace and kerchiefs were still pretty cool. And a little picturesque fantasy never hurt anybody, eh?

  11. London-is-changing-intlist

    Public art project London is Changing makes Londoners uncomfortably aware of the truths we’re perhaps trying to ignore: that our city is morphing beyond recognition, that creativity is at risk, and that for many people, it’s simply becoming unaffordable.

  12. Bensanders-potdealer-3-int_copy

    While keeping himself busy with postmodern Howard Hodgkin-esque painting and collage work, Ben Sanders is somehow finding the time to paint funny faces on ceramics. Cutting through the “worthy lifestyle” pottery trend with googly eyes, zigzag nostrils and creepy grins, Ben has stamped his sense of humour and aesthetic all over these thriving succulents’ homes.

  13. Olafur-eliasson_little-sun-int-1

    A “giddy joy” was described as the feeling evoked by the artwork of Olafur Eliasson when we interviewed him for last year’s Autumn edition of Printed Pages, and with his monumental, often participatory pieces, it’s not hard to see why. From his incredible 2003 Weather Project at Tate Modern to its portable, socially-conscious, tiny counterpart Little Sun(which “produces clean, affordable, and portable solar-powered lamps to areas of the world without reliable access to electricity”), his work is a glorious, utterly original ray of light shining on the sometimes impenetrable art world.