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    Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle for Printed Pages Spring 2014: Repeat (detail)

Set Design

Set Design: Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle collaborate for Printed Pages

Posted by Maisie Skidmore,

We have the utmost respect for the seemingly limitless creative brains of the brilliant Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle, photographer and set designer respectively, with their bonkers images and unmistakable visual stylings. So when it came to commissioning a feature for the Spring issue of Printed Pages Magazine we were more than happy to hand the task over to them and give them full rein.

They set the bar pretty high for themselves too, aiming to create a “typology of movement,” engineering a series of flexible forms that strangely resemble slides and then manipulating them in every way imaginable to create the illusion of different kinds of movement. The resulting series, Repeat, is much a testament to the sheer perfectionism the pair share as it is to the reach of their imaginations.

The new issue explains: “They’ve explored how different dynamic forms can be expressed visually, creating images that encompass extreme velocity, a lazy slump or an eager fluid curl. Bouncing rubber balls, card trickery and formations of soldiers marching have informed a set of real-world phenomena, translated into their abstract creations.”

Printed Pages Spring 2014 is out now and available from the Company of Parrots store.

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    Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle for Printed Pages Spring 2014: Repeat

  • Bd_gt_repeater_catapilar_focusstack_01

    Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle for Printed Pages Spring 2014: Repeat

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    Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle for Printed Pages Spring 2014: Repeat

  • Bd_gt_repeater_stairs_0327-main

    Bruno Drummond and Gemma Tickle for Printed Pages Spring 2014: Repeat

Ms-300

Posted by Maisie Skidmore

Assistant Editor Maisie joined It’s Nice That fresh out of university in the summer of 2013 and has stayed with us ever since. She has a particular interest in art, fashion and photography and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

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