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Miscellaneous

Editor's Letter: January

Posted by Rob Alderson,

Hey everybody, 2012 is here! With the London Olympics (definite) and the destruction of all humanity (possible, according to the Mayans). So as we survey it from this peak of possibility, dazed and dizzied by the intoxicating uncertainty that stands ahead, let us reclaim January from crabby diet-pushers and buzzkill detox-ers. For this is the beginning, fresh and perfect but for some drizzle. This is what we have in store…

First up, we are changing up our weekday, midday guest post slot. We have been humbled by some of the great creatives who have shared their wisdom with us over the years, but things must move one. We will be using the same slot to focus on the current and the relevant – the trends, festivals, studios, museums, cities, towns, hamlets, in short the things people are talking about and that we feel deserve extra special attention. Sometimes this will still take the form of a guest post, but we feel there is scope to expand the range of our coverage while maintaining the nice daily rhythm guest post brought us.

If you visited the site in December you will also know we had our biggest ever review of the year, broken down by disciplines and by months, to celebrate the people and projects that captured our hearts in 2011. If for some reason you missed, wallow in (recent) nostalgia here.

We’re digesting the reaction to the redesigned Issue #7 which has bowled us over, and early discussions about Issue 8 are getting underway which we find VERY exciting.

And we’ve also been delighted with the ongoing feedback from our In Progress 2011 conference held at the Barbican in December, in case you missed the write-up that’s here, and keep your eyes peeled for a splendidly thrilling special project that launches at the end of this week. It has to be a secret for now but believe us this will drop your jaw.

Keep it crazy Nice cats.

Rob

Ra

Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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