• Gilesduley6

    Giles Duley: MSF in South Sudan, 2009

Photography

We look at the inspirational story of Giles Duley for our new Here profile

Posted by James Cartwright,

One day in 2002, after a feud with a former Big Brother contestant, Giles Duley walked off the set of a shoot and turned his back on music and fashion photography forever. Having worked at the forefront of the fashion and music press for the best part of a decade this was no small event – Duley had made his career photographing the likes of Pulp, Oasis and The Prodigy at the height of their fame. But he had other plans for his photographic talents, ones that would take him far from the London studios in which he spent his days.

Duley turned his lens on humanitarian issues and left the UK to document conflicts across South Sudan, Bangladesh and Ukraine amongst others. Here he was as successful as he had been while photographing the entertainment industry and his ability to document the triumph of the human spirit in the face of conflict saw him nominated for an Amnesty International Media Award and a winner at the Prix de Paris. Sadly that success was abruptly cut short.

  • Gilesduley9

    Giles Duley: Self Portrait

In 2011 while on foot patrol with the US Army in Afghanistan Duley was blown up by a landline and lost both legs and his left arm. He nearly lost his life. Thankfully he survived and his personal story has elevated the profile of his photographs, finally bringing the conflicts he documents to a global audience. Since his accident Giles has vowed that he will return to work in late 2012, determined to keep documenting the causes he so dearly believes in.

At Here Giles will tell his incredible story, from his days at the NME to his current struggles acclimatising to life with severe disability, taking you through his personal and photographic journey. You’ll also be able to see Giles’ work up close and personal shortly after Here as he’s just been selected for the Taylor Wessing Exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in November.

Here is at London’s Royal Geographical Society on Friday September 21. The event is now sold out but you can add yourself to the waiting list or get more information here.

We had the pleasure of speaking to Giles face-to-face last November and you can read the interview here.

  • Gilesduley1

    Giles Duley: Nick, living with Autism, 2008

  • Gilesduley2

    Giles Duley:The family of Prymorska Street, Odessa, Ukraine, 2010

  • Gilesduley3

    Giles Duley: IOM/UNHCR, Angola, 2008

  • Gilesduley4

    Giles Duley: Acid Burn Survivors, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2009

  • Gilesduley5

    Giles Duley: Acid Burn Survivors, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2009

  • Gilesduley8

    Giles Duley: Rohingya Refugee Portraits, Bangladesh, 2009

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Photography View Archive

  1. List

    There are coffee table books, and then there are huge, fantastic publications so weighty that they’re likely to shunt your table a couple of inches closer to the floor, as in the case of this staggering beauty by TASCHEN. The Rolling Stones is a 518-page testament to the incredible wealth of photographs that have been taken of the iconic band over the course of their 50 year career, and it’s breathtaking.

  2. List

    I occasionally forget how incredibly dependent I am on photojournalism to provide a context to articles I’m reading, especially when said articles deal with ideas formulated by experts who’ve spent decades researching subjects I can barely even pronounce. Producing this photographic re-contextualisation is kind of Alexi Hobbs’ job, when he’s commissioned by media giants like Monocle and TIME to provide imagery that explains their articles. And fortunately for them and us alike, he’s very very good at it.

  3. Main

    The seventh issue of the spectacular online photography journal Accent Magazine is here. Pieced together by Lydia Garnett and Lucy Nurnberg, the pair source some of the best young photographers working today and accept submissions of image-based stories from each one to collate into a temporary online space. This issue is truly spellbinding: the stories are even more poignant, the photography is even more crisp and jaw dropping. Personally I find that it can be hard to concentrate on reading a whole printed magazine in one go, but something about this corner of the internet allows me to get stuck in immediately and devour it. Well worth a good half an hour of your time if you can give it. A huge congrats to Lucy and Lydia, again!

  4. List

    Driving around Johannesburg early in the mornings, photographer Marc Shoul was puzzled by the number of domestic workers he saw out walking their employers’ dogs. “The complexion of servitude is pretty obvious in the city, even as things change,” he explains. “When I see domestic workers, some in uniform, walking their owners’ dogs, it is hard not to reflect on how unaffected the rituals of suburban affluence are during this period of seismic urban change.”

  5. List

    There’s always something a little strange about parades. For us, they ignite a confused sort of excitement and delight in the voyeurism of looking on at others united for a cause, never entirely certain what’s going on, never totally engaged with the pageantry and accoutrements and singularity of the gathered crowd’s purpose. This sense is captured perfectly in Holly Falconer’s stunning photographic series Parade, in which she documents a little-known celebration called the Neston Ladies Day parade. The annual march sees women and girls take to the streets of the Cheshire town on the first Thursday of June, in a procession featuring a banner bearing the phrase: “Bear Ye One Another’s Burdens.”

  6. List-2

    Alexander Coggin’s photographs remind me of those scenes in sci-fi films when you see everything from the perspective of an extra-terrestrial who’s just landed on Earth for the first time. A master of the white balance, he somehow manages to cast a coolly detached, slightly surreal light over the everyday domestic scenes that pervade his portfolio, making everything from a green marble sink to a tray of readymade hors d’oeuvres seem completely new and slightly out of touch. He’s just updated his website with loads of new work which proves my point adeptly. See more from him here.

  7. List

    Whenever we’ve featured Nick Ballon on the site in the past, we’ve tended to focus on his self-initiated projects such as his terrific study of a Bolivian airline or his work in the weird world of wrestling. However Nick is also a super-talented editorial photographer and his portraits for the likes of the The Sunday Times and The Guardian’s weekend supplements are well worth exploring.

  8. List

    Judging by the photographs she was commissioned to take for Bloomberg Businessweek, Stephanie Gonot and American radio show host Jesse Thorn were a seriously good match. She was commissioned by the publishing giants to photograph Bullseye founder Jesse, and where many would have fallen into that chic, perfectly polished and occasionally dull trap that portrait photographers so often have to skirt around, she succeeded in steering well clear and opted to capture him larking about instead; gesticulating wildly in his office, sitting in a giant banana (?) and photographing the view from his desk.

  9. List

    Grant Cornett is an effing (no swearing here, thank you) good photographer. Really EFFING good. The Brooklyn-based image-maker has been plying his trade in New York for just over a decade, creating work that’s incredibly broad. Within his vast portfolio lives immaculate food photography, still-life fashion shoots, a plethora of punchy magazine covers and some stellar portraiture. It’s too much to hope to encapsulate in a single post so for the meantime feast your eyes on these portraits of faces – some famous, some not so – all given the Grant Cornett treatment and exquisitely immortalised.

  10. List

    You know when you go on holiday and you’re so keen to make the most of every view that you walk around with your iPhone glued to your hand? That, in essence, is the subject of this brilliant series by Catherine Hyland, who was last on the site when she photographed a dilapidated theme park in China back in 2012. It is slightly more complicated than that however, as she explains; the series looks to draw attention to the “cultural concepts of landscape deeply embedded in the development of contemporary leisure sites.”

  11. List

    Edmund Clark is one of the most interesting artists working today, exploring what is arguably the defining issue of the past 13 years. He’s interested in the wars waged by the USA and UK in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the fall-out from this foreign policy and how it impacts on us here at home. His new book The Mountains of Majeed continues this theme, as it’s a reflection on “the end of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan through photography, found imagery and Taliban poetry.”

  12. List

    When those from the music world travel into the art world, their journeys can result in somewhat mixed creative results. Some musicians, like Ronnie Wood, move into rather grotesque paintings, while Dean Blunt regularly fills Hackney’s Space gallery with baffling images (like these strange Evisu jeans emblem-based works) and The Specials bassist Horace Panter likes painting robots. As such, we find some of the outcomes of this tricky transition are perhaps less accomplished than others – a mixtape you listen to with one finger firmly on the “skip” button, if you will.

  13. Listy

    Tom Johnson strikes me as a photographer who captures the people and the places around him as they actually are, not as he would like them to look so as to fit simply and stylishly into his portfolio. His work spans portraiture and documentary photography – he once bought a 1980s motorhome and travelled up and down the UK photographing the people he came across – and touches distant edges of the population, from female bodybuilders and transvestites to a clan of Peckham’s sapeurs. He’s currently looking to merge the three areas of his practice into one, with new commissions for The New British and VICE pushing him to new territory and to photograph evermore fascinating characters.