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Publication

It's Nice That No.7

Posted by It's Nice That,

While It’s Nice That No.7 is at the printers, and excitement here slowly builds around its return, we thought we’d offer further insight into the reasons why and how we’ve evolved the magazine’s design, as well as a run through of this issue’s wonderful content. It’s available to order now, don’t forget, and will launch officially on Monday…

Design

It’s Nice That No.7 has undergone a sparkling – and in some places quite dramatic – redesign. The changes come courtesy of our new design steward Ray O’Meara, an RCA graduate, former Kilimanjaro designer and current The White Review art director, who’s experience and talent have combined to create an object at once beautiful and accessible. Evolution in the magazine’s design is echoed by an evolution in editorial structure too, which we hope will make it easier for viewers to view and readers to read. It’s a simple concept, but one we firmly believe in.

Content

Although we’ve continued with our all-embracing approach, this issue has inadvertently – but rather appropriately – become about the bright future of publishing. i-D founder Terry Jones and Nieves editor-in-chief Benjamin Sommerhalder both celebrate the co-existence of printed and digital content. And the fantastic documentary photographer Martin Parr talks excitedly about the recent surge in sales of photobooks, before going on to champion the internet despite its tendency towards offering imagery for free.

We’ve also taken a peak behind the scenes of four of London’s most impressive independent publishing houses – Book Works, Four Corners, Nobrow and Landfill – and, in an ongoing bookshelves feature, three of England’s most talented young writers – Stuart Evers, Rosa Rankin-Gee and Richard Milward – reveal their wide-ranging literary inspirations.

There’s more too. To mark the opening of her latest show at Berlin’s Neue Nationalgalerie, we spoke to artist and explorer Taryn Simon, who talked candidly about living life in the real world. The brilliantly creative Amsterdam-based duo Lernert & Sander talk about the importance of mixing humour with naughtiness. Our online editor Rob Alderson importantly questions the power of art as a regeneration tool. And, after a conversation about winter, filmmaker Carl Burgess presents a series of hyper-real renders bright enough to make your eyes pop!

And then there’s everything else: a free comic by the wonderful illustrator Sophy Hollington, work by some of the most talented artists, designers and architects currently practicing, a wonderful short story by Seth Fried, and the perfect ending by illustrator Keith Shore and writer Erin Wylie.

Nice

Posted by It's Nice That

The It’s Nice That byline is used on posts that relate to the site in general, specific announcements or pieces where there is no clear single author. Contact us using the email address below if you have questions, feedback or complaints.

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