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Illustration

Illustration: Few image makers evoke atmosphere as well as Kilian Eng

Posted by Rob Alderson,

One of my absolute favourite spreads in The Annual 2013 is a double page illustration of a couple being boated through a mysterious subterranean world. It springs from the mind of Sweden-based master of atmosphere Kilian Eng, whose portfolio I checked back in on this week. His Behance proves he’s been impressively busy; alongside the weird and wonderful sci-fi flavoured worlds we know he is so adept at creating, there’s various other treasures to be enjoyed, not least his concept art for “mind-bending action film” KOYAKATSI. Fantastical imagination and technical expertise is one thing, but add in this level of consistency and you know you’re in the presence of something really special.

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: Untitled

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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    Kilian Eng: KOYAKATSI

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Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Illustration View Archive

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