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    Leandro Erlich: The Furniture Lift

Art: Leandro Erlich's installation floats above the French city of Nantes

Posted by Emily Beber,

You might remember Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich from his spectacular installation Dalston House earlier in the year, where visitors hung from windows, skated window sills and scaled the facade of a house that laid horizontally in front of the foundations of a Victorian house destroyed by bombing in the Second World War. Or perhaps you know him for his illusory corridors, lift shafts or his swimming pool galleries where art-goers are permanently submerged beneath the surface.

So perhaps this work will be less of a surprise, but if you can resist gawping at this next installation, nothing will impress you. Taking the centre square of Nantes, France as his exhibition space, Leandro has moved in Monte-meubles – L’ultime déménagement, The Furniture Lift. This extraordinary work is yet one more illusion to add to the collection, seeing the corner of a room suspended as though having abandoned the rest of its house with brickwork revealed and floorboards gaping at the joists. Created for the biannual Le Voyage a Nantes that sees the entire city of Nantes transformed into an art gallery, Leandro’s installation stood an terrifying 30 feet high, supported by a ladder alone. Appearing to float independently, let’s go with superstition and say that is one ladder you definitely would not want to walk underneath but admire, from a comfortable distance.

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    Leandro Erlich: The Furniture Lift

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    Leandro Erlich: The Furniture Lift

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    Leandro Erlich: The Furniture Lift

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    Leandro Erlich: The Furniture Lift

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Posted by Emily Beber

Emily worked with us as an editorial intern during her summer break from the Royal College of Art and wrote for the site between August and September 2013.