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    Maria Smith and William Edmonds

Nicer Tuesdays

A look back at last night's Nicer Tuesdays event on collaboration

Posted by It's Nice That,

Last night in a quest to find out whether Jack Johnson was right when he wailed that we are “better together” – we’ve been caught out by Jack’s pronouncements before! – It’s Nice That took over Shoreditch Studios to explore the theme of collaboration.

Kicking off our fourth Nicer Tuesdays event, Maria Smith from Studio Weave and William Edmonds from Nous Vous spoke about how they came to collaborate on the wonderful Ecology of Colour project last year. It all stemmed from Studio Weave spotting Nous Vous’ work at an exhibition and from there the partnership grew, and continues to flourish. Both also mentioned projects they had worked on separately with other partners, setting up what would become a recurring theme of the evening – that there are different kinds of collaboration.

Up next Hollie Walker and Freddie Powell from Wieden + Kennedy gave us an insight into how five years’ working together at university and now in the ad industry had forged their creative partnership. They shared their rules for collaboration – including “Be nice to each other” and “The other is usually right” – and gave us behind-the-scenes glimpses at projects like the Moonwalking Pony for 3 (below) to demonstrate just how much of a team effort even these short spots are.

Claire Martin and Nick Hartwright from The Mill Co. and The Mill Co. Project filled the short attendee slot last night and spoke persuasively about how creatives should have the choice between solitude and collaboration depending on the work they are doing.

They were followed by illustrators and animators the Layzell Brothers (Matt and Paul) who described themselves as “chemical brothers, in terms of DNA not the band.” With a fast and furious mix of their own videos and some motivational slides, they whisked us through the challenges of working with each other, big names like Adam Buxton and even “American people.”

Rounding off the evening were Simon Esterson and John Walters of Eye magazine. They explained how rather than splitting up their responsibilities into editing and art direction, they preferred a “fluid conversation” and admitted that “everything that goes into the magazine is the fruits of several sorts of collaboration.” They ended on a defiant note which resonated with the audience: “If you going to print something, you might as well print it really, really well.”

Thanks to all our speakers and to everyone who came down. Nicer Tuesdays will take a break in June because of Here but will be back later in the summer.

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    Nicer Tuesdays: Collaboration

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    Hollie Walker and Freddie Powell

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    Claire Martin and Nick Hartwright

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    Token Crowd Shot

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    Paul and Matt Layzell

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    Paul and Matt Layzell

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    Paul and Matt Layzell

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    Nicer Tuesdays: Collaboration

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    Simon Esterson and John Walters

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    Simon Esterson and John Walters

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