Davenport_ain_tnothingbutapeninmyhand

Bruce Davenport Jr., Ain’t Nothing But A Pen In My Hand, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_ain_tnothingbutapeninmyhand2

Bruce Davenport Jr., Ain’t Nothing But A Pen In My Hand, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_idowhatidobutidon_tlikedoingitalong

Bruce Davenport Jr., I do what I do but I don’t like doing it alone, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_idowhatidobutidon_tlikedoingitalong2

Bruce Davenport Jr., I do what I do but I don’t like doing it alone, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_makingmygrandparentsproudoftheirgrandbaby

Bruce Davenport Jr., Making My Grandparents Proud of Their Grandbaby, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_makingmygrandparentsproudoftheirgrandbaby2

Bruce Davenport Jr., Making My Grandparents Proud of Their Grandbaby, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_makingmygrandparentsproudoftheirgrandbaby3

Bruce Davenport Jr., Making My Grandparents Proud of Their Grandbaby, 2011 Fabercastell markets and pen on acid free paper/ 40 × 60 inches Courtesy of the Artist

Davenport_-jr_marching-band

Bruce Davenport Jr. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Davenport_-jr_marching-band2

Bruce Davenport Jr. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Work / Art

Prospect.2: Bruce Davenport Jr.

The New Orleans Biennial, Prospect.2, appropriately holds a mirror to the city’s character and history with the variety of art on show – pulling in big international names (Sophie Calle), big local artists (William Eggleston) and lesser-known New Orleans creatives. Falling into the latter – but with no less critical esteem – is Bruce Davenport Jr. His perspective-less, intense iterations of marching bands are a vast miniaturisation about the idea of “assembly” (historically, politically and musically). A kind of folk art through its social intentions and depiction, it is still also seen as fine art as he exhibits time and again to an excellent reception.