• Big_together

    This week’s Things

  • L_1

    Look!

  • L_2

    Look!

  • L_3

    Look!

  • M_1

    Monosten Specimen

  • M_2

    Monosten Specimen

  • M_3

    Monosten Specimen

  • S_2

    Football Stadiums

  • S_1

    Football Stadiums

  • S_3

    Football Stadiums

  • Ng_3

    Flesh and Bone

  • Ng_2

    Flesh and Bone

  • Ng_1

    Flesh and Bone

  • T_2

    Plus Patrick Hughes

  • T_1

    Plus Patrick Hughes

Graphic Design

Things

Posted by Alex Moshakis,

Featuring a font specimen, a pair of t-shirts, an animal kingdom rendering, a designer-packed book and (in honour of tonight’s game) a zine exploring the aesthetic of football stadiums, Things is here (shouting boozed-up soccer chants at other It’s Nice That features)…

Look! Nina Beckmann, Linda Johansson

Kolla! is many things: a competition, a series of events, a platform/forum for discussion on the arts. Look!, too, is more than first meets the eye – a book that documents Kolla! primarily, but something that is a resource in its own right, full of good work and better ideas. Featuring texts by design luminaries Sara de Bondt, James Goggin and Angus Hyland (among many others), the book also acts as a who’s who of the contemporary design/illustration world.
www.kolla.se

Monosten Specimen Colophon, The Entente

We covered Monosten when it first appeared, and considering we’re big fans of Colophon (the foundry that produced and distributes the typeface) and The Entente (the guys behind Colophon), it seems inevitable we feature Monosten Specimen, a loose-leaf introduction to the font, and an education in how to use it correctly!
www.colophon-foundry.org
www.the-entente.org

Flesh and Bone John Sibbick, No Brow

Although I didn’t realise it until Flesh and Bone was kindly delivered to our door by Joe Kessler, John Sibbick was almost entirely responsible for my initial interest in the animal kingdom. More specifically, Sibbick, a freelance animal illustrator/paleoartist, introduced me to the dinosaur, the pre-historic beast he has specialised in rendering since 1972 (he’s in fact so well known for drawing dinosaurs they named one after him.) What we should all be happy to know is that he’s recently collaborated with publishers Nobrow, and has produced a spine-tingling concertina depiction of all things animal!
www.nobrow.net

Football Stadiums Oscar Bolton Green

It seems appropriate given this weekend’s big match that we should feature Oscar Bolton Green’s Football Stadiums, an illustrative homage to the visual language of European stadia. Bolton Green’s document is careful and considered, rubbishing any existing belief that football is a game loved only by beer-chugging louts.
www.oscarboltongreen.com

Mood Indicator, Plus Patrick Hughes Plus Agency, Patrick Hughes

To announce their arrival, Plus Agency (a recent amalgamation of two existing creative studios) has collaborated with artist Patrick Hughes to produce a duet of t-shirts entitled Mood Indicator. We’ve only photographed the “happy” version – it’s the weekend after all, and what better reason is there to smile? – but there also exists a “sad” equivalent that’s just as lovely.
www.plusagency.co.uk

Portrait8

Posted by Alex Moshakis

Alex originally joined It’s Nice That as a designer but moved into editorial and oversaw the It’s Nice That magazine from Issue Six (July 2011) to Issue Eight (March 2012) before moving on that summer.

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