• Big_together

    This week’s Things

  • L_1

    Look!

  • L_2

    Look!

  • L_3

    Look!

  • M_1

    Monosten Specimen

  • M_2

    Monosten Specimen

  • M_3

    Monosten Specimen

  • S_2

    Football Stadiums

  • S_1

    Football Stadiums

  • S_3

    Football Stadiums

  • Ng_3

    Flesh and Bone

  • Ng_2

    Flesh and Bone

  • Ng_1

    Flesh and Bone

  • T_2

    Plus Patrick Hughes

  • T_1

    Plus Patrick Hughes

Graphic Design

Things

Posted by Alex Moshakis,

Featuring a font specimen, a pair of t-shirts, an animal kingdom rendering, a designer-packed book and (in honour of tonight’s game) a zine exploring the aesthetic of football stadiums, Things is here (shouting boozed-up soccer chants at other It’s Nice That features)…

Look! Nina Beckmann, Linda Johansson

Kolla! is many things: a competition, a series of events, a platform/forum for discussion on the arts. Look!, too, is more than first meets the eye – a book that documents Kolla! primarily, but something that is a resource in its own right, full of good work and better ideas. Featuring texts by design luminaries Sara de Bondt, James Goggin and Angus Hyland (among many others), the book also acts as a who’s who of the contemporary design/illustration world.
www.kolla.se

Monosten Specimen Colophon, The Entente

We covered Monosten when it first appeared, and considering we’re big fans of Colophon (the foundry that produced and distributes the typeface) and The Entente (the guys behind Colophon), it seems inevitable we feature Monosten Specimen, a loose-leaf introduction to the font, and an education in how to use it correctly!
www.colophon-foundry.org
www.the-entente.org

Flesh and Bone John Sibbick, No Brow

Although I didn’t realise it until Flesh and Bone was kindly delivered to our door by Joe Kessler, John Sibbick was almost entirely responsible for my initial interest in the animal kingdom. More specifically, Sibbick, a freelance animal illustrator/paleoartist, introduced me to the dinosaur, the pre-historic beast he has specialised in rendering since 1972 (he’s in fact so well known for drawing dinosaurs they named one after him.) What we should all be happy to know is that he’s recently collaborated with publishers Nobrow, and has produced a spine-tingling concertina depiction of all things animal!
www.nobrow.net

Football Stadiums Oscar Bolton Green

It seems appropriate given this weekend’s big match that we should feature Oscar Bolton Green’s Football Stadiums, an illustrative homage to the visual language of European stadia. Bolton Green’s document is careful and considered, rubbishing any existing belief that football is a game loved only by beer-chugging louts.
www.oscarboltongreen.com

Mood Indicator, Plus Patrick Hughes Plus Agency, Patrick Hughes

To announce their arrival, Plus Agency (a recent amalgamation of two existing creative studios) has collaborated with artist Patrick Hughes to produce a duet of t-shirts entitled Mood Indicator. We’ve only photographed the “happy” version – it’s the weekend after all, and what better reason is there to smile? – but there also exists a “sad” equivalent that’s just as lovely.
www.plusagency.co.uk

Portrait8

Posted by Alex Moshakis

Alex originally joined It’s Nice That as a designer but moved into editorial and oversaw the It’s Nice That magazine from Issue Six (July 2011) to Issue Eight (March 2012) before moving on that summer.

Most Recent: Graphic Design View Archive

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  2. Arndtbenedikt-posters-list-int

    Scrolling through Frankfurt-based design agency Arndt Benedikt’s website, I get the impression that somebody in the studio is sneaking off every half an hour to immortalise some of the fantastic design work they’re creating in poster form. Or maybe managing partners Felix Gross and Falko Ohlmer are just really into posters – in which case, hurrah! Alongside remarkably advanced work like this campaign for Greenpeace, and some mature corporate design work they make these: bright, dynamic and joyous posters, for everything from a spell teaching at the University of Applied Sciences Mainz to an open air party in Hamburg. They’re informative and really nice to look at, which is all we need from our large-scale printed matter.

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  6. Jorgeleon-amigo-int-list

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  7. Unnamed

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  8. Screen-shot-2015-01-26-at-10.12.37

    It’s little surprise that Mike Lemanski’s graphic design work has been something of an It’s Nice That favourite, and since we last posted about him in 2013 he’s not let his style slip. Mike’s site boasts some beautiful, mature designs for Feuilleton magazine, which takes articles from various international publications such as The New York Times, translates them into French and publishes issues every quarter.

  9. Hardyseiler-hannover-list-int

    When Hanover-based designers Bureau Hardy Seiler and web design agency Created by Monkeys decided to pitch to design the identity for the Freies Theater Hannover, they found themselves faced with a dilemma. The theatre hosts every flavour of live performance going, from puppetry and musical shows to experimental dance, and all in one flexible and family-friendly space. How could they create a graphic language to match that?

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  11. Parades-artdillier-sale-int-1

    When you’ve got a load of Christmas stock to flog at the start of the new year there’s only one way to go; have a big sale. But everyone else has had that exact same idea, and it’s a pain in the arse to make a sale look good right? Wrong! If you’re smart you’ll hire Bordeaux’s Bureau Parade to come up with a bespoke solution to communicate your low, low prices. Geometric shapes, bold colours and a playful use of typography meant that everyone knew about the sweet deals at Bordeaux’s most high-end shoe retailer, Michard Ardillier, without the store having to Xerox a bunch of giant red signs à la Tie Rack. Nice solution to an often overlooked problem if you ask us.

  12. Cometsubstance-sleeve-1-int

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  13. Oyalstudio-dishonestmanifest-int-list

    Portugal’s Royal Studio are not just winningly adept at creating bold, interesting and creatively ambitious visual treatments – they’re also terrific at writing the most intriguing project summaries I think I’ve ever seen. There’s a fine line between being weird and funny on the one hand, and gratuitously wacky on the other but these guys manage to pull off descriptions that mirror the invention, and occasional iconoclasm, in their work. Take The Dishonest Manifest, a series which seems to be ridiculing the preoccupation with how posters look as opposed to how well they do their job. The clearest indication of this is a long, thin creation with the phrase “Don’t give a fuck about content” repeated over and over again.