• Things-hero

    This week’s Things

Graphic Design

Roll up, roll up for a flavoursome Things full of paper, a children's mag and a film festival programme

Posted by Rebecca Fulleylove,

Things has learnt something the hard way this week, and that is rotary fans can only do so much and air conditioning should be a legal requirement. But it’s cooling down now so while Things peels itself off of the white plastic lawn chair, like a melting Dali clock face, we have a Fruit Pastille lolly of wonderment, in five fruity layers of creativity. At the top we have a blackcurrenty tinged football-fixtures-laced newspaper, slurping our way down to an exhibition and paper catalogue both packed full of icy sweetness, a brief stop at a strawberry-filled children’s mag and ending the gastronomic process with a zesty flavoured film festival programme. And don’t forget to use the stick to point knowingly at everything you’ve just seen – now let’s get licking!

  • Footballcover

    Judith Erwes: Football in Colour

  • Football

    Judith Erwes: Football in Colour

  • Football2

    Judith Erwes: Football in Colour

Judith Erwes: Football in Colour

Now ‘the beautiful game’ and I weren’t really made for each other, football likes shin guards and sweaty embraces whereas I like anything but that. However when a project is as engaging as photographer Judith Erwes’s Football in Colour, I start to wonder whether me and football have just misunderstood each other. A playful take on this year’s Euro 2012 match fixtures, this delightful newspaper uses portraits of young football fans of the corresponding nations to illustrate them. The photos are great with the kids donned in kit and mascots and it’s a really creative spin on what otherwise would just be a list of words and numbers.
www.unpatient.com

  • Cambercover

    Rosie Eveleigh, Natalie Kay-Thatcher and Billie Muraben: Camberwell Press- Into the Fold

  • Camber

    Rosie Eveleigh, Natalie Kay-Thatcher and Billie Muraben: Camberwell Press- Into the Fold

  • Camber2

    Rosie Eveleigh, Natalie Kay-Thatcher and Billie Muraben: Camberwell Press- Into the Fold

Rosie Eveleigh, Natalie Kay-Thatcher and Billie Muraben: Camberwell Press- Into the Fold

For two-and-a-half weeks publishing platform, Camberwell Press (housed within Camberwell College of Arts) aimed to create the concept of the ideal studio within a public space through a series of talks, workshops and other projects – and here is the reading material that was produced during that time. This comprehensive record offers an insight into the progression made throughout the event in a clear way, being broken down into chapters and sub-sections. With some visuals to ease the text-heavy publication, it’s really great to see this kind of thinking coming from young creatives.
www.camberwellpress.org

  • Grand

    Me & Dave: Fedriogni- Our Grand Tour

  • Grand2

    Me & Dave: Fedriogni- Our Grand Tour

  • Grand3

    Me & Dave: Fedriogni- Our Grand Tour

Me & Dave: Fedriogni- Our Grand Tour

I used to love looking through catalogues when I was younger and dog-ear the pages with things I’d imagine I’d buy when I was a grown-up. The truth is I still do that now, which is even sadder because some of the things I dog-tag, I really should be able to afford (like socks).

But never have I seen a catalogue as beautiful as this one created for Fedrigoni by design agency Me & Dave and it’s all for the love of paper – the company’s Marcate range to be exact. Bright hues and muted tones, Our Grand Tour takes us on a global adventure with laser cut pages that build a fuller picuture of these international pit-stops. High-quality and beautiful, I urge everyone to re-consider their personal paper stocks just so you can have a languid look through this.
www.me-and-dave.com

  • Anorakcover

    Cathy Olmedillas: Anorak Magazine Vol. 23

  • Anorak

    Cathy Olmedillas: Anorak Magazine Vol. 23

  • Anorak2

    Cathy Olmedillas: Anorak Magazine Vol. 23

Cathy Olmedillas: Anorak Magazine Vol. 23

This is the type of magazine that should be a shining beacon in the children’s magazine literature genre because it’s really great. More than that Anorak magazine is engaging, happy, colorful, wonderfully designed and has a tone throughout that never patronises its readers, but actually speak to them on the same level. This volume of the quaterly kids mag is themed around sports, containing stories, illustrations and activities in a diverse range of styles. I can’t help but grin at every page it’s that joyful!
www.anorakmagazine.com

  • Eastfilm

    Studio Pretty: East End Film Festival Programme

  • Eastfilm2

    Studio Pretty: East End Film Festival Programme

  • Eastfilm3

    Studio Pretty: East End Film Festival Programme

Studio Pretty: East End Film Festival Programme

There are some events that you go to because they’re on your doorstep like your neighbour’s house-warming, the opening of a coffee shop below your office or even a private view just down the road from where you buy your milk and Rolos. But for the East End Film Festival happening in London this July, convenience is not the only reason why we should pop along. It not only boasts a fabulous filmic programme including Swandown, Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry and Make Your Own Damn Art: The World of Bob and Roberta Smith but there’s also this fabulous free guide packed full of info and featuring a natty new four-eyed brand identity. Sweet as.
www.studiopretty.com

Becky-picture

Posted by Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca joined us as an editorial intern after studying at Norwich University College of the Arts. She originally wrote for the site between March and June 2012 and returned in the summer of 2014 for a four-week freelance stint.

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