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    Two Points: I Love Helvetica

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Publication: Two Points release two stunning new additions to their I Love Type series

Posted by James Cartwright,

I Love Helvetica and I Love Times are Two Points’ latest additions to their I Love Type range; books that bring together modern examples of classic typefaces in use across cutting edge graphic design and illustration. Within each are examples of today’s best practitioners breathing life into often-dismissed serifs like Times and reimagining the hugely celebrated (generally overused) sans serif Helvetica. Also included in the series are Futura, Avant Garde, Bodoni, DIN, Gill Sans and Franklin Gothic – all of which have sold out, but which Hong Kong publishers Vition:ary have plans to re-release later in the year. Consider this your heads-up!

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    Two Points: I Love Helvetica

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    Two Points: I Love Helvetica

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    Two Points: I Love Helvetica

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    Two Points: I Love Helvetica

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    Two Points: I Love Times

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    Two Points: I Love Times

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    Two Points: I Love Times

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    Two Points: I Love Times

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    Two Points: I Love Times

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

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