• 2_1

    George Condo: Mental States

  • 2

    George Condo: Mental States

  • 1

    George Condo: Mental States

  • 3

    Private Eye: The First 50 Years

  • 8

    Private Eye: The First 50 Years

  • 9

    Private Eye: The First 50 Years

  • 7

    Lubok Books

  • 6

    Lubok Books

  • 5

    Lubok Books

Exhibition

What's On: London

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

You forgot your coat today which is excusable – it’s so sunny! and you were wearing shorts pretty much yesterday – but now you are cold and you feel silly in your grey merino sweater. So go find a gallery – free heat, plus AMAZING art. We recommend George Condo at the Hayward Gallery if you’re near Waterloo, or if you’re near South Kensington perhaps the V&A who have many, many sardonic-iconic Private Eye covers? You’re east? Great – Beach London open their Lubok Books exhibition tonight!

George Condo: Mental States Hayward Gallery

As surreal as this exhibition is (very), George Condo is similar to a number of other artists whose technical brilliance is such that they find reality lacking – so they’d rather paint crazy things instead. So bizarre physiognomy, some reworking of the basic principles behind portraiture, a thing called “abstract-figuration” (huge paintings composed by a multitude of “all-over” images) and some pondering over the nature of mania. Highly charged and hugely enjoyable, these works perform an incredible feat of looking how you’d expect to feel if you were being driven mad (hence the name of the exhibition). Showing until January 8.
www.itsnicethat.com/whats-on/george-condo

Private Eye: The First 50 Years V&A

Private Eyeis the: "lampooner of public figures and entities that it deemed guilty of any of the sins of incompetence, inefficiency, corruption, pomposity or self-importance and it has become a self-styled “thorn in the side” of the British establishment." Thanks Wikipedia, that’s marvellous. I’m not going to pretend I can pick up on every single in-joke those wry lot at Private Eye have established in layer upon cynically-brilliant layer, but what I do know is that the graphic satire of their covers are unique, the cartoonists they’ve employed are brilliant and their articles are damningly good. A display of the designs will be on show until January 8.
www.itsnicethat.com/whats-on/private-eye

Lubok Books Beach London

Since 2007, Christoph Ruckhäberle has been publishing Lubok Verlag. Lubok produce small runs in respect to the reproductive possibilities of artist books these days, yet they maintain a traditionally Russian mentality of fastidiously printed books that are inexpensive. Especially when you consider that they look, smell and feel like the real deal (they are) and each volume is a commission of contemporary artists to “realise their artistic signature in linocuts” – they are also originals. These graphic works and books, which embrace the medium’s vernacular and print in bold, pulpy colours are a real treat. Showing until October 30.
www.itsnicethat.com/whats-on/lubok-books

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Exhibition View Archive

  1. Max-colson-itsnicethat-list

    If you live in a city, the chances are you’ve already encountered the digital composite images used to advertise the new “urban builds” popping up left, right and centre like ant hills in an otherwise lovely summer’s garden. Have you ever taken a second to recognise how hilarious a spectrum of “urban residents” they include though? A lovely smattering of white middle class men aged between 20 and 40, perpetually swinging briefcases, with the odd sweet-looking woman pushing a buggy for good measure.

  2. Jenny_holzer_hauser_and_wirth_int_list

    You would be forgiven for thinking Jenny Holzer’s hard-hitting work and guerrilla tactics would seem incongruous in the English countryside. Somerset is an unlikely setting for the American artist whose first public works Truisms began as posters dotted around Manhattan in the late 70s where, among many things, she first told the world “There’s a fine line between information and propaganda.” A few years later her plea to be saved from ourselves blazed above New York’s capitalist heart in Times Square: “Protect me from what I want.”

  3. Barbican-list

    “We wanna be free, we wanna be free to do what we wanna do,” as we heard through Primal Scream (it’s a quote from the film The Wild Angels , fact fans). Now for the Barbican’s mammoth Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening show by Doug Aitken, artists from Gillian Wearing to Bob and Roberta Smith and graphic design studios including Zak Group and Good Wives and Warriors have created posters responding to the concepts “free” or “freedom.” As you’d expect from such a varied bunch, the posters show a huge range of approaches to the brief, including a depiction of a smoking vicar and a few simple, typographic responses from Ruth Ewan and Zak Group. The idea behind the posters’ creation was to echo “the sprite of Fluxus happenings,” according to the Barbican, and will be pasted throughout the centre-wide show.

  4. Warhol_underground_int_list

    From The Velvet Underground to the silver studio-cum-squat-palace that was the Factory, Andy Warhol’s reach extended far beyond painting and screenprints. So ingrained is he in the fabric of modern culture it is virtually impossible to escape his influence even today. A new exhibition at the Centre Pompidou-Metz in France explores his many collaborations and the relationship between music, dance and art in his unfading body of work.

  5. Charlie-kwai-itsnicethat-list

    Forgive me a moment of philosophising, but all too often we walk through our lives with our eyes glued to Citymapper, or street signs, or the electronic noticeboard in the tube, and miss the eclectic, bizarre and utterly extraordinary collection of people we pass by on a daily basis. But in London at least, Charlie Kwai is on a one-man mission to capture the collection of people who disappear into the abyss, and in doing so he has built up a collection of snapshots documenting our cultural environment.

  6. Fraser-muggerige-barbican-happening-its-nice-that-list

    The worlds of conceptual art and functional graphic design cross perhaps less often than they should. But creating a piece of design that has to perform in a commercial sense and the expression of complex, looser artistic ideas can come together beautifully, as exemplified in the little corner devoted to graphic design at the Barbican’s current show by Doug Aitken, Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening.

  7. List-nationwide_howitshouldbe1

    D&AD has announced the winners of the New Blood Awards, which celebrate young creatives. The winners were selected from designers that responded to real briefs set by Airbnb, BBC, WWF, Facebook, Nationwide, npower, Pantone, i-D, Monotype, John Lewis, TalkTalk, VICE, WeTransfer and WPP. The awards are open to anyone in full or part-time education, recent graduates who finished their course within the past two years and anyone 23 or under.

  8. Royal_academy_summer_exhibition_poster_list

    I never thought I’d use the word irreverent to describe the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy. Since 1769 the RA has taken a fairly unwavering and conservative approach to the world’s largest open submission exhibition, hanging up to 1,000 works by both amateur artists and great names. Long the lacklustre foxhole of stuffy Academicians and part-time painters, this year marks the greatest effort the RA has made yet to reinvigorate the English summer stalwart.
     
    It’s no surprise that the man behind the brightest, boldest edition yet is Michael Craig-Martin, this year’s curator and the artist best known for his Pop Art palette and his tutorship of YBA trailblazers Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas. Among his modernisms for the show is the decision to repaint the three central galleries in colours lifted straight from his work: hot pink, turquoise and baby blue. Far from playing to mere spectacle, Craig-Martin’s trademark penchant for polychrome is a bold statement that does away with both the white cube mis-en-scène of contemporary art and the fusty grandeur of the Academy. Regular attendees might also notice he has made the print galleries more central.

  9. 9.koons_tulipanes-itsnicethat-list

    There’s been a lot of conversation in the studio recently about art exhibitions that beg to be photographed, and they don’t come much more Instagrammable than the Jeff Koons retrospective. Having started out at New York’s Whitney Museum and then progressing to Paris’ Centre Pompidou, the show has just begun the final leg of its journey at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, where we attended the opening last week; to take a selfie with the balloon dog, among other things.

  10. 8_red-with-red-1_2007_%c2%a9-2015-bridget-riley.-all-rights-reserved_-courtesy-karsten-schubert_-london-itsnicethat-list

    Bridget Riley’s work is utterly fascinating to me. Her enormous geometric canvases, ranging from illusory patterns to orderly explosions of colour have developed over the course of her career to create an extensive oeuvre exploring every dark corner of shape and form. Behind the expansive canvases lies a deeply methodical approach which, although invisible to the viewer, is the concrete foundation to her work, and in this new UK retrospective at the De La Warr Pavilion the accompanying studies will be displayed alongside the finished canvases. Spanning 50 years worth of her curve paintings and including more than 30 paintings and studies, it looks set to be a show to remember.

  11. Ema-itsnicethat-list

    Musician and multi-media artist EMA has launched a call-out to members of the public to send her their “sacred objects,” which she will digitally destroy as part of a performance piece called I Wanna Destroy (Sacred Objects from Suburban Homes). The piece will take place as part of her residency in Station to Station: A Three Day Happening at the Barbican this summer, and will take the form of an immersive performance and installation featuring music, visuals, and a virtual reality environment for Oculus Rift.

  12. Ruth_van_beek_rehearsal_it's_nice_that_list

    London is the most Instagrammed city in the world, but this week photography has hit the capital like never before. Over the next four days some 70 galleries have taken up residence under Somerset House’s neoclassical roof, bringing together a mix of vintage and contemporary prints for the largest photography fair ever held in London.

  13. Camper_life_on_foot_its_nice_that_list

    Shoes are functional. They keep our feet dry and safe from the elements but we have an ingrained desire to take the humble shoe beyond this purpose. We like to make them into objects we can admire, play around with and explore. For Spanish footwear brand Camper, this sense of fun is at the heart of what they do and we’re given a glimpse of this creativity in a new exhibition at the Design Museum. Life on Foot marks the 40 year anniversary of Camper and takes us on the journey from collection conception all the way to the shop floor.