Jc

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

jc@itsnicethat.com@jdmcartwright

1420 articles
  1. Jayme-spinks-int-list

    Frustratingly we’ve just put together a feature on Montreal for the Spring 2015 issue of Printed Pages and if we’d known of Jayme’s existence before yesterday we’d definitely have asked her to show us around. Hers is a diverse range of clients and projects that encompass everything from playful (award-winning) sexual health resources for queer women, to slick, sensual record sleeves for Canadian singer/songwriter Dinah Thorpe. In between there are artist books, posters and exhibition catalogues, all of which demonstrate Jayme’s tailored approach to design; never relying on stylistic tropes or trends of the moment.

  2. Benjamin-dittrich-int-list

    German graphic artist Benjamin Dittrich is principally concerned with scale at both a micro and macro level. He preoccupies himself with subjects as large as the cosmos and as minute as molecular structures, zooming in and out in his textural works to reveal vast and complex systems. His retro-futuristic work is breathtakingly complex, utilising painted and printed layers to launch you though time and space. He’s got a new show opening at Spinnerei Archiv Massiv tonight in Leipzig, which if you’re based nearby we’d urge you to get down to. Utterly beautiful stuff!

  3. Die-katze-int-list-2

    You don’t really see them in the UK anymore but there was once a time when fag machines populated bars, clubs, railway stations, street corners and children’s swimming pools so that everyone could readily get their hands on a dose of sweet lady nicotine at a moment’s notice. There’s still a few lingering in Switzerland though, so Daniel Peter and Alice Kolb have found a more family-friendly and creative use for them.

  4. Ghospoet-shedding-skin-int-list

    Shedding Skin is the third studio album from London’s Obaro Ejimiwe, aka Ghostpoet. For anyone unfamiliar with his output we’d recommend going back and acquainting yourselves with everything he’s done since 2011’s Peanut Butter Blues and Melancholy Jam, arguably one of the most exciting albums of British hip hop to emerge in the past decade.

  5. Jeremie-fischer-wilkommen-in-hausland-int-list

    Jeremie Fischer is an extraordinary illustrator hailing from Strasbourg in France. He’s four prolific years out of university and has filled his time since graduation with the slavish production of illustrated books – for himself, for Nowbrow and for Nyctalope.

  6. Colline-new-list-int

    Tonight sees the launch of a new book by photographer Annie Collinge at Ti Pi Tin bookstore up on Stoke Newington High Street in London. Some of you should get down there, but we appreciate that others of you are perhaps thousands of miles away. So here for your delectation are some spreads from the book and some close-ups of the images within.

  7. Art-belikov-int-list

    I can’t tell you a whole lot about Lithuanian artist Art Belikov other than he’s 24 years old and, er, Lithuanian. And that all his images are fantastical digital creations. But in spite of the lack of background information currently available to me I’d just like to say that his work is extraordinary. He’s a maker of 3D rendered images depicting scenes borrowed from late 90s sci-fi; all “vintage” cell phones and games consoles, cans of mysterious energy drinks and designer bottled water. There’s a 666 in his URL too so you can be sure he’s a cool guy! When we finally track the man down we’ll ask him some questions about what it all means, but for now just drink in the eerie beauty of his digital creations.

  8. Nick-vokey-coach-bird-int-list

    Oi graphic designers! What do you get up to in your spare time? Spot of kerning is it? Take the kids down to the font foundry and do a type casting workshop yeah? Well you’re really letting the side down. Nick Vokey’s a graphic designer who’s worked for The New Yorker and MIT Technology Review and in HIS spare time he makes comics about a medical doctor who coaches a local pee-wee football team and has been turned into a bird by a wizard. He’s a foul-mouthed bastard of a bird but incredibly funny indeed. Have a look at Nick’s comics and then reassess the way you use your weekends. You too could be making an hilarious bird-themed odyssey of graphic art. (This also applies to anyone who isn’t a graphic designer).

  9. Gabriela-maskrey-lapulperia-int-list

    In the two years since we first featured nomadic designer Gabriela Maskrey she’s taken on a lot of new projects and pushed her skills in all sorts of new directions. Originally she was all about editorial design – which it has to be said, she was great at – but she’s recently branched out into branding for Peruvian luxury food company La Pulperia. Her bold serif rendering of the company name coupled with historic imagery referencing Peru’s gastronomic culture combines to satisfying effect, and the addition of hand-drawn icons is a great touch too. All in all a great first foray away from the world of books and magazines.

  10. List

    You’re 25 years old and Richard Turley calls you up out of the blue and says; “Hey, I’ve just got this sweet job at MTV and I’d like you to come on board as my senior designer, are you interested?” Of course you’re interested! You’d be a fool not to be interested, even if it means leaving your current (also awesome) job as an art director at The New York Times. Sounds nice right? Well this isn’t some fictional story I’ve just concocted in my head, this is the soon-to-be legendary tale of Erik Carter, a Virginia native turned New York City creative powerhouse who’s filling our (music) televisions with choice tidbits of witty animation and humorous asides from the world of the web.

  11. Skrillex-doompy-poomp-int-list

    Fleur & Manu’s latest video for everyone’s favourite ex-goth Skrillex is a bit of a repetitive tale. It takes the form of a mulleted dropout failing to get a loan from his bank, and then having to relive the painful experience again and again, Groundhog Day-style until he loses his shit completely and the whole thing descends into a cross-dressing, semi-naked musical. There are some great hairy backs thrown into the mix too. With a synopsis like that how could you resist?

  12. Altos-adventure-int-list

    Bad news guys, I’ve got a new game to tell you about that’s going to eat up all your free time and turn you into one of those dopey phone-tapping lunatics that stare at you all bug-eyed when you ask them to “Get the hell out of the WAY!” on the morning commute. I’ve not had this kind of crippling addiction since Monument Valley, but this one’s bitten me hard.

  13. Daniel-swan-django-django-list

    Four years after first discovering Daniel Swan’s website he’s still not bothered to put any work on it. There’s just a 3D-rendered glittery keyring that bears his name and serves as his calling card. He’s a confident man! Still, when you’re producing work as good as Daniel, you can afford to be confident. Last time we had him up on the site he had collaborated with David Rudnick on an incredible desert apocalypse for RL Grime, and this latest offering for Django Django is no less impressive.

  14. Kurppa-hosk-korshags-int-list

    It’s not often I get to write about my two great loves in a single article, but sometimes the stars align and I’m covering smoked fish and graphic design all in the space of 300 words. Today I feel blessed! This strange combination of subjects has come together thanks to Swedish agency Kurppa Hosk undertaking a wholesale rebrand for Falkenbergs Lax, a small, family-owned smoked salmon specialist. Charged with turning the small-scale brand into an international major player in the fish industry, Kurrppa Hosk renamed it Korshags, and have came up with a sleek new visual identity to accompany the new name.

  15. George-primo-louw-1

    As a rule we profile Jorge Primo on the site once a year; first due to posters for a shoe brand, then a carpenter’s identity and last year it was just for his personal work. This time round Jorge has been hard at it making graphics for skateboarding brand Louw. He’s done designs for their decks, exuberant posters and even knocked up a hand-drawn version of their logo. Choice!

  16. Francesco-del-russo-bologna-int-list

    Graphic designer Francesco Delrosso has spent the past few years making his way through undergraduate study and out into the big wide world of Fabrica, Benetton’s communications research centre. There he’s honed his skills in research-based design, putting them to use in the creation of all manner of print publications. Since leaving Fabrica he’s settled in Urbino where he’s specialising in communication and editorial design at Isia.

  17. Simon-roussin-film-projects-int-list

    In the three years since we last posted Simon Roussin’s work it appears the French cartoonist has become something of a cinephile. A huge amount of his illustrated output now comes in the form of homages to classics of the medium, including obsessive screen-printed books about the late, great Steve McQueen, Gerard Depardieu’s best bits and some of Clint Eastwood’s most brutal showdowns. Of course it goes without saying that his drawing goes from strength to strength. What’s wonderful about Simon’s film obsession is his ability to balance an addiction to the silver screen and a prolific illustration career, something my mum once told me was impossible.

  18. Braulio-amado-nyt-int-list

    Braulio’s been a busy boy lately since he took up his full-time post art directing over at Bloomberg Businessweek. You’d think a job at one of the world’s most respected bi-weeklies would keep his time pretty well occupied, but the restless designer still finds plenty of spare hours to horse around with personal projects, sell weird ouija boards online and hand-letter for The New York Times Magazine. We wonder how he ever gets any rest? “I should indeed sleep more,” he says.

  19. Two-points-aamodt-plumb-int-list

    I always imagine that rebranding an architectural consultancy must be the dream gig for a design agency. There’s so much to work with in terms of structural materials, geometric forms, textures, type and slick photography. Even so it’s not every day you see an architectural rebrand executed with the kind of flair with which Two Points has created Aamodt/Plumb’s new corporate materials.

  20. Come-de-bouchony-7-years-int-list

    We bang on a fair bit about how good documentation of creative work can be almost as important as the work itself. You might have produced the most typographically brilliant piece of print but if you’ve photographed it badly the outcome will inevitably be shit. But what about if you’ve got seven years’ worth of creative work to document; almost a decade of prolific visual communication? Well then you’re in trouble.

  21. Draw-down-cleon-peterson-int-list

    If you’re a fan of the explicit ultra violence prevalent Cleon Peterson’s work you already know Draw Down’s latest monograph on the artist is going to be an essential volume for your collection. If you’ve never encountered him or you’re faint of heart then this might not be one for you. Either way there’s a foreword written by Shepard Fairey, an essay discussing Cleon’s place in art history by Christopher and Kathleen Sleboda and of course plenty of Cleon’s magnificent work. It may be graphic in the basest sense with its visceral merging of violence and sex, but we’ve always been fans of these chaotic monochrome orgies and can’t wait to own some in print. Get pre-ordering!

  22. Louis-granet-fort-worth-int-list

    I’m fast falling in love with the work of Parisian illustrator and artist Louis Granet. The student of the Haute Ecole des arts du Rhin produces comics the likes of which I’ve never seen. His drawing style is unique in its use of unnerving perspective, frantic, angular line work and the childlike application of colour – plus his comics feature empty speech bubbles that offer no clue as to the story within each panel. Granted, that sounds like quite a confusing combination, but Louis’ work is full of drama, suspense and, in spite of its nebulous nature, tangible narratives.

  23. Kk-velocita-int-list

    When I think of major league sports brands the name Umbro doesn’t come to mind – sorry lads. That’s probably because they’re comparatively small, British and their logo’s not as cool as the Nike swoosh or whatever that adidas thing is (again, sorry). But Umbro’s latest ad is making me think I’ve got them all wrong; that they’re capable of trouncing the major players when it comes to their advertising budget.

  24. Philip-jodidio-taschen-cabins-int-list

    If you were under the sad misapprehension that a cabin was nothing more than a timber shack in the woods then think again sunshine because publishing powerhouse TASCHEN has just dropped a weighty new tome designed to prove you wrong. It’s recently released Cabins, a 450-page epic by Philip Jodidio that explores the many and varied forms that the traditional residence of shepherds and hermits might take – from brutalist mountain-top penthouses to more traditional timber structures tucked away on the forest floor. The photography, texts and format of the book are all pretty stunning, but the entire package is tied together with luxurious vector illustrations from Cruschiform that show floor plans and idealised renderings of a selection of these superb structures.

  25. Tom-blachford-midnight-modern-list

    Some very simple pleasures here from photographer Tom Blachford, who’s been staying up long past his bedtime to capture stunning architectural shots. The Australian photographer’s been hard at it in California photographing the state’s mid-century modernist buildings by moonlight. The long-exposure shots frame each angular structure in an atmospheric glow that evokes the glamorous film sets of a bygone era. They speak for themselves really; they’re beauties. Enough said.

  26. List

    Dan Stafford where have you been all my life? Just round the corner in east London probably, making your beautiful work and keeping yourself to yourself. But I wish I’d found you sooner; I’d have pestered you endlessly to draw me things for the magazine, or draw things for my own personal collection. We’d have talked over briefs, joked about your early sketches for the commission and then fist-bumped over that final Photoshop file. We could have been great together Dan Stafford. Hopefully we still can!

  27. Teenage-engineering-pocket-synths-int-5-list

    Jesper Kouthoofd’s Teenage Engineering is one of the most technologically exciting outfits in the field of audio. The experimental design lab has only released a small run of products since its inception in 2007 but has a hard-earned reputation for incredible quality and style. It has built stunning wireless speakers and one of the world’s most sought-after synthesisers, as well as collaborating with the likes of Absolut on unusual branded products. It has just released a new edition to its line in the form of Pocket Operators, three miniature synthesisers that can fit in your jeans.

  28. Yoko-honda-int-list

    Although it’s a source of inspiration for a number of different creative types, Yoko Honda’s artwork channels the aesthetics of the 1980s more so than anyone else I’ve come across. Her digital paintings pay homage to the garish and the gaudy, channeling an era of affluence and excess. The self-taught artist hails from Tokyo but takes inspiration from the USA. “When anyone expresses the 80s,” she says, “there’s that element of Miami and California – you could say they’re the places that symbolise the 80s best (the place of the dream).”

  29. Field-resonate-identity-int-list

    As a rule conference identities err on the side of blandness, encapsulating complex ideas and disciplines with typographic treatments that do nothing to capture the imagination of their attendees. In fact even the word conference fails to get the creative juices flowing. Which is why Field’s work for the 2015 edition of Serbian tech festival Resonate is such an unusual and exciting addition to the visual language of talks-based events.

  30. David-oreilly-adult-swim-list

    David OReilly has always been a genius; a rare breed of provocative animator able to make us feel an extraordinary range and depth of emotion as we watch his crudely-rendered geometric characters live their lives on screen. His batshit crazy early animation Octocat Adventures won us over years ago as soon as that sad little eight-legged feline started screaming at the top of a hill. Since then he’s released two breathtakingly beautiful short films – Please Say Something and The External World – consulted on feature films like The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Her and even directed and episode of Adventure Time.

  31. List

    LA-based creative Eddie O’Keefe is principally a filmmaker – he produces stunning homages to early 1960s American culture – but his photographic work is a sight to behold. Firmly rooted in the past and bubbling seductively with sun-kissed Americana, Eddie focusses his lens on subjects as mundane as car windscreens and old chairs (and of course, the odd blood-soaked cheerleader), gently persuading you that you’re viewing a record of an era when your parents were out on the razzle. Sure, the cynic in me thinks that there’s a legion of Intagrammers who think they’re making this kind of heady, nostalgic artwork on a daily basis, but Eddie’s the real deal, he’s recreating this grainy, seductive world for himself, and this is the good stuff!

  32. Gunmad-or-type-int-list

    Reykjavík/London-based design duo GUNMAD (Guðmundur Úlfarsson and Mads Freund Brunse) has been pretty damn productive the past couple of years working on commercial projects, generating typefaces and working towards a new exhibition in collaboration with Unit Editions.

  33. Maggie-shannon-swamp-yankee-int-list

    26-year-old Brooklyn photographer Maggie Shannon has just been touted as one of Magnum’s 30 under 30 – which given the prestige of the organisation is no mean feat. A quick flick through her portfolio confirms Magnum’s assertion that she’s a talented image-maker, but there’s one project in particular that stopped me dead in my tracks. Tucked in among the intimate portraits of strangers and documentary-style images of female musicians at work was the lifeless head of a shark staring blankly back at me.

  34. Exposure-bjorn-borg-int-list

    When you think of Björn Borg you think of great tennis, luxurious golden locks and really expensive underpants – or at least I do, particularly the pants. What I don’t think of is high octane online gaming, of gun-toting lovers destroying negative bad guys on screen, or of a shirtless man riding a giant bear. But then, what do I know; apparently that’s exactly what Björn Borg is all about these days.

  35. Christian-borstlap-de-bijenkorf-int-list

    I always get excited when Christian Borstlap gets in touch. The director of creative agency Part Of A Bigger Plan has never sent me anything I didn’t want to feature, whether that’s slick animations of Wallpaper*’s design awards sculpture tessellating and metamorphosing with geometric precision or some paper-cut dragons swimming down the Yangtze – he always does things well.

  36. Malachi-ward-int-5

    Californian comics artist Malachi Ward treads a fine line between outlandish superhero fiction and achingly powerful personal tales. The Pasadena resident is always feverishly busy working on new self-initiated stories, or collaborating with Matt Sheehan on drawing and colouring for Image Comics’ Prophet Strikefile series.

  37. Ged-palmer-int-list

    I came across Ged Palmer’s work for the first time a couple of years ago over a boozy pub lunch with my dad, and since then I’ve followed his progress in hand lettering and sign-writing with interest. His skill in this traditional medium has gone from strength to strength, with new techniques and processes added to his arsenal on a regular basis, and what started out as a simple flair for type has progressed into a fully-formed talent for fashioning works of graphic brilliance.

  38. Penelope-gazin-int-list

    Weird is a word that’s applied lazily to anything that’s even vaguely out of the ordinary. You start chatting to a stranger on the bus: “Weird!” You have a dream where you’re in your house, and it doesn’t look anything like your house, but all your family live there and you have your own room so it must be your house: “Weird!” You take a new route on the walk home from work for no particular reason at all: “Weird!” None of these things are weird you damn fools. Weird is MUCH more exciting than that.

  39. Reffmercy-old-english-int-list

    The past twelve months have been busy for Bristolian animator Ruffmercy as he’s knocked out video after video for the likes of Lily Allen, Run The Jewels, Danny Brown and Wiley, enticing them with his unique concoction of live action and hand-drawn animation. The latest addition to his stable of excellent videos is for Young Thug track Old English which sees him dispense with the live action altogether, going hell-for-leather on the animation in a disorientingly fast-paced spot. It’s a lyric video but not as we know it, with scraps of slang flying up on screen in a brightly-coloured, childlike scrawl. And while I don’t actually have a clue what “slimes,” “boolin’” or “Mollies” are, I get the impression – and you will too – that the subject of the song is drug-related. Chop that chicken down!

  40. Bedow-record_mania-int-list

    Swedish design studio Bedow isn’t new to branding musical enterprises. Back in 2013 it produced a clean, minimal identity for Canadian record label More Than Human. That work was nice, but its latest offering for Stockholm’s internationally renowned store Record Mania might be even better.