Jc

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

jc@itsnicethat.com@jdmcartwright

1396 articles
  1. Philip-jodidio-taschen-cabins-int-list

    If you were under the sad misapprehension that a cabin was nothing more than a timber shack in the woods then think again sunshine because publishing powerhouse TASCHEN has just dropped a weighty new tome designed to prove you wrong. It’s recently released Cabins, a 450-page epic by Philip Jodidio that explores the many and varied forms that the traditional residence of shepherds and hermits might take – from brutalist mountain-top penthouses to more traditional timber structures tucked away on the forest floor. The photography, texts and format of the book are all pretty stunning, but the entire package is tied together with luxurious vector illustrations from Cruschiform that show floor plans and idealised renderings of a selection of these superb structures.

  2. Tom-blachford-midnight-modern-list

    Some very simple pleasures here from photographer Tom Blachford, who’s been staying up long past his bedtime to capture stunning architectural shots. The Australian photographer’s been hard at it in California photographing the state’s mid-century modernist buildings by moonlight. The long-exposure shots frame each angular structure in an atmospheric glow that evokes the glamorous film sets of a bygone era. They speak for themselves really; they’re beauties. Enough said.

  3. List

    Dan Stafford where have you been all my life? Just round the corner in east London probably, making your beautiful work and keeping yourself to yourself. But I wish I’d found you sooner; I’d have pestered you endlessly to draw me things for the magazine, or draw things for my own personal collection. We’d have talked over briefs, joked about your early sketches for the commission and then fist-bumped over that final Photoshop file. We could have been great together Dan Stafford. Hopefully we still can!

  4. Teenage-engineering-pocket-synths-int-5-list

    Jesper Kouthoofd’s Teenage Engineering is one of the most technologically exciting outfits in the field of audio. The experimental design lab has only released a small run of products since its inception in 2007 but has a hard-earned reputation for incredible quality and style. It has built stunning wireless speakers and one of the world’s most sought-after synthesisers, as well as collaborating with the likes of Absolut on unusual branded products. It has just released a new edition to its line in the form of Pocket Operators, three miniature synthesisers that can fit in your jeans.

  5. Yoko-honda-int-list

    Although it’s a source of inspiration for a number of different creative types, Yoko Honda’s artwork channels the aesthetics of the 1980s more so than anyone else I’ve come across. Her digital paintings pay homage to the garish and the gaudy, channeling an era of affluence and excess. The self-taught artist hails from Tokyo but takes inspiration from the USA. “When anyone expresses the 80s,” she says, “there’s that element of Miami and California – you could say they’re the places that symbolise the 80s best (the place of the dream).”

  6. Field-resonate-identity-int-list

    As a rule conference identities err on the side of blandness, encapsulating complex ideas and disciplines with typographic treatments that do nothing to capture the imagination of their attendees. In fact even the word conference fails to get the creative juices flowing. Which is why Field’s work for the 2015 edition of Serbian tech festival Resonate is such an unusual and exciting addition to the visual language of talks-based events.

  7. David-oreilly-adult-swim-list

    David OReilly has always been a genius; a rare breed of provocative animator able to make us feel an extraordinary range and depth of emotion as we watch his crudely-rendered geometric characters live their lives on screen. His batshit crazy early animation Octocat Adventures won us over years ago as soon as that sad little eight-legged feline started screaming at the top of a hill. Since then he’s released two breathtakingly beautiful short films – Please Say Something and The External World – consulted on feature films like The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Her and even directed and episode of Adventure Time.

  8. List

    LA-based creative Eddie O’Keefe is principally a filmmaker – he produces stunning homages to early 1960s American culture – but his photographic work is a sight to behold. Firmly rooted in the past and bubbling seductively with sun-kissed Americana, Eddie focusses his lens on subjects as mundane as car windscreens and old chairs (and of course, the odd blood-soaked cheerleader), gently persuading you that you’re viewing a record of an era when your parents were out on the razzle. Sure, the cynic in me thinks that there’s a legion of Intagrammers who think they’re making this kind of heady, nostalgic artwork on a daily basis, but Eddie’s the real deal, he’s recreating this grainy, seductive world for himself, and this is the good stuff!

  9. Gunmad-or-type-int-list

    Reykjavík/London-based design duo GUNMAD (Guðmundur Úlfarsson and Mads Freund Brunse) has been pretty damn productive the past couple of years working on commercial projects, generating typefaces and working towards a new exhibition in collaboration with Unit Editions.

  10. Maggie-shannon-swamp-yankee-int-list

    26-year-old Brooklyn photographer Maggie Shannon has just been touted as one of Magnum’s 30 under 30 – which given the prestige of the organisation is no mean feat. A quick flick through her portfolio confirms Magnum’s assertion that she’s a talented image-maker, but there’s one project in particular that stopped me dead in my tracks. Tucked in among the intimate portraits of strangers and documentary-style images of female musicians at work was the lifeless head of a shark staring blankly back at me.

  11. Exposure-bjorn-borg-int-list

    When you think of Björn Borg you think of great tennis, luxurious golden locks and really expensive underpants – or at least I do, particularly the pants. What I don’t think of is high octane online gaming, of gun-toting lovers destroying negative bad guys on screen, or of a shirtless man riding a giant bear. But then, what do I know; apparently that’s exactly what Björn Borg is all about these days.

  12. Christian-borstlap-de-bijenkorf-int-list

    I always get excited when Christian Borstlap gets in touch. The director of creative agency Part Of A Bigger Plan has never sent me anything I didn’t want to feature, whether that’s slick animations of Wallpaper*’s design awards sculpture tessellating and metamorphosing with geometric precision or some paper-cut dragons swimming down the Yangtze – he always does things well.

  13. Malachi-ward-int-5

    Californian comics artist Malachi Ward treads a fine line between outlandish superhero fiction and achingly powerful personal tales. The Pasadena resident is always feverishly busy working on new self-initiated stories, or collaborating with Matt Sheehan on drawing and colouring for Image Comics’ Prophet Strikefile series.

  14. Ged-palmer-int-list

    I came across Ged Palmer’s work for the first time a couple of years ago over a boozy pub lunch with my dad, and since then I’ve followed his progress in hand lettering and sign-writing with interest. His skill in this traditional medium has gone from strength to strength, with new techniques and processes added to his arsenal on a regular basis, and what started out as a simple flair for type has progressed into a fully-formed talent for fashioning works of graphic brilliance.

  15. Penelope-gazin-int-list

    Weird is a word that’s applied lazily to anything that’s even vaguely out of the ordinary. You start chatting to a stranger on the bus: “Weird!” You have a dream where you’re in your house, and it doesn’t look anything like your house, but all your family live there and you have your own room so it must be your house: “Weird!” You take a new route on the walk home from work for no particular reason at all: “Weird!” None of these things are weird you damn fools. Weird is MUCH more exciting than that.

  16. Reffmercy-old-english-int-list

    The past twelve months have been busy for Bristolian animator Ruffmercy as he’s knocked out video after video for the likes of Lily Allen, Run The Jewels, Danny Brown and Wiley, enticing them with his unique concoction of live action and hand-drawn animation. The latest addition to his stable of excellent videos is for Young Thug track Old English which sees him dispense with the live action altogether, going hell-for-leather on the animation in a disorientingly fast-paced spot. It’s a lyric video but not as we know it, with scraps of slang flying up on screen in a brightly-coloured, childlike scrawl. And while I don’t actually have a clue what “slimes,” “boolin’” or “Mollies” are, I get the impression – and you will too – that the subject of the song is drug-related. Chop that chicken down!

  17. Bedow-record_mania-int-list

    Swedish design studio Bedow isn’t new to branding musical enterprises. Back in 2013 it produced a clean, minimal identity for Canadian record label More Than Human. That work was nice, but its latest offering for Stockholm’s internationally renowned store Record Mania might be even better.

  18. Isabellucena-tarot-int-list

    When it comes to Tarot cards we’ve pretty much seen it all. Since the arrival of the Rider Waite deck in the early 20th Century nobody in the western world has really changed the game and made The Fool, The Ace of Wands or The Hierophant look all that different from Pamela Colman Smith’s incredible drawings. But recently designer Isabel Lucena has had a crack at it, and the results are surprisingly refreshing.

  19. Victionary-kanji-int-list

    It’s fair to say I’ve got a bit of a penchant for design that utilises Chinese characters. I stumbled into a show of Japanese posters in Berlin about a decade ago and since then I’ve been hooked. So I’m pant-wettingly (sorry, terrible visual image) excited about viction:ary’s new tome, Hanzi, Kanji, Hanja, which offers a pretty comprehensive look at the use of Asian logograms in the world of branding and graphic design.

  20. Mattpanuska-barbara-int-list

    In ancient times Matt Panuska would have been some kind of shamanistic guide, plying his wards with ayahuasca and leading them through their subconscious with a gentle hand. Unfortunately he lives in modern-day Brooklyn, where DMT-related healing is positively discouraged, so Matt makes his living drawing images that seem born from an altered mind.

  21. Visser-namaqualand-int-list

    Day-to-day Francois Visser is the kind of photographer you’ll find with his lens trained on scantily clad, elfin adolescents, such is the nature of fashion photography. But his carefully-composed portraits have a sensitivity that many newcomers lack; a substance-before-style approach that denotes a mature understanding of his medium.

  22. Parades-artdillier-sale-int-1

    When you’ve got a load of Christmas stock to flog at the start of the new year there’s only one way to go; have a big sale. But everyone else has had that exact same idea, and it’s a pain in the arse to make a sale look good right? Wrong! If you’re smart you’ll hire Bordeaux’s Bureau Parade to come up with a bespoke solution to communicate your low, low prices. Geometric shapes, bold colours and a playful use of typography meant that everyone knew about the sweet deals at Bordeaux’s most high-end shoe retailer, Michard Ardillier, without the store having to Xerox a bunch of giant red signs à la Tie Rack. Nice solution to an often overlooked problem if you ask us.

  23. Flylo-coronus-the-terminator-int-list

    Coronus, The Terminator is the latest single from Flying Lotus, taken from the album You’re Dead! As the album title suggests, it’s a moody, atmospheric tune, backed up by an equally heavyweight video. The five minute epic comes courtesy of Young Replicant and Pulse films and follows a dying man through his last minutes on Earth, hovering between conscious and unconscious worlds, battling the demons of his past before he moves into the next world.

  24. Tilljanz-olafur-list-int

    Remember back in July 2013 I said that photographer Till Janz was making a pretty impressive name for himself in the portrait photography business? Well, not to toot my own trumpet, but look who he’s been shooting lately. A-list Hollywood filmmaker Spike Jonze, check; king of the modern art world Olafur Eliasson, check; exclusive editorials for 032c, covers for Zeit Magazin and campaigns for Nike; check, check, check. It’s also worth mentioning he only got seven minutes for all those shots of Mr. Jonze. Anyway, needless to say the boy’s done good, and it’s great to watch him progress into the big leagues. Toot toot!

  25. Alexdacorte-easternsport-1-int

    Perennial student artist Alex Da Corte has qualifications, residencies and awards coming up to his eyeballs having studied Film, Animation and Fine Arts at New York’s School of Visual Arts, Printmaking and Fine Arts at The University of the Arts, Philadelphia and then a cheeky MFA in Sculpture at Yale. Busy guy!

  26. List

    “As the story goes, the young Kenzo Takada left his job cutting patterns at a Tokyo department store in the mid-1960s to try his luck in fashion in the French capital. When he arrived in Paris in 1964 he had no money, little command of French, and no contacts to speak of, but his characteristic wide-eyed wonder served him well.

  27. List

    Over the past few years we’ve swooned at the beautifully designed, endlessly imaginative work of Studio Swine, whose constant experiments in the field of sustainable design seem to yield nothing but desirable results. We became so infatuated in fact, that we decided to run a whole magazine profile on the duo in the Winter issue of Printed Pages, tracking them down to a temporary studio in east London to quiz them about their process and motivations.

  28. List

    As one of the biggest independent magazines in the world, Kinfolk, has become a strange publishing phenomenon – a print-only title published in multiple languages that’s managed to find huge captive audiences in nations as diverse as Japan, Russia and the USA. It tips itself as “a slow lifestyle magazine… that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family.”

  29. List

    Orson is only 12 years old but has already achieved my unrealised childhood dream of publishing his own graphic novel. Last Saturday saw the launch of his latest title, The Adventures of Hal Dekenzin, at Orbital Comics in London – an event that included not only freshly printed comics, but also a plethora of live drawing by the author himself.

  30. List

    Hanneke Minten and Saskia Pouwels are Hats & Tales, a design duo from Rotterdam adept in strategy and branding work. They “focus on all the visible translations of the complete design concepts we create. From an event style to motion, from signage to posters, from visual identities to silkscreening and from strategy to impossible collaborations.” Last week they sent us a friendly little video re-introducing themselves and their work, so we felt obliged to take another proper look at their portfolio – it’s been almost three years since we last checked in.

  31. List

    In November 2014 it was announced that London’s Kemistry Gallery was leaving its Shoreditch home after an astronomical rent rise it was unable to meet. Much of the conversation around the news looked forward to the future, amid ambitious plans for a bigger, better space that could become a UK centre for graphic art and design.

  32. List

    It’s rare that old age is really celebrated, let alone portrayed in a fashion that makes it look like fun, but street photographer Michelle Groskopf’s shots of oldies captured in Larchmont, USA are a different story altogether. These guys seem to be having a blast; they’re cheeky, glamorous and charismatic. The series doesn’t just focus its lens on the over-60s of this Los Angeles suburb, there are teenagers, young mums and suited businessmen too, but the photos of the older generation are refreshingly cheerful, so here they are edited down for your enjoyment.

  33. List

    I come back to Benjamin Marra’s sketchbooks time and again when I feel like real life is just a little too drab. The witty and irreverent comics artist has an insatiable appetite for the surreal and absurd that never fails to get me tittering away like a cheeky schoolboy. Everything from the unusually-proportioned physiques of his protagonists to the bizarre headlines that run across his images serve to delight and entertain, whether that’s the catchily-named Fantomah Meets Madame Satan at a Lesbian Bar in Hell or the wild-eyed warrior LuLu Benedict: Angry Bitch, Vigilante Gangleader. He’s also drawn one of the finest portraits of Beyoncé I’ve ever laid eyes on. Long may his madness continue!

  34. List

    Carl Kleiner is a man whose reputation precedes him. He’s known internationally for his extraordinary still-life photography and has spawned countless imitators over his career. But his new book (out later this year) is unlike the Carl Kleiner most of us know. For starters this six book archive displays nothing of the pristine, polished studio environment with which we usually associate him, and secondly he’s swapped digital for analogue, using a second-hand Rolleflex and Portra film to capture his photographs.

  35. List

    The term “ruin porn” gets thrown around a lot to describe images of abandoned buildings and architectural forms that have fallen into disrepair. The Atlantic have published essays on the psychological reasons we’re incapable of tearing our eyes from it, and Detroit has become the poster city for this captivating genre of destructive, bleak photography – in fact it seems to be a genre that’s almost exclusively American.

  36. List-1

    Just before Christmas an excitable Jane Stockdale came bounding into the studio with even more energy than usual to tell us about a graphic designer she’d just met in Barcelona. We hastened to check out his website, flicked through a bunch of projects and quickly realised that Jane’s enthusiasm was totally justified – Arnau is indeed a man of many talents.

  37. List

    Sometimes I confess I’m overwhelmed by the sheer volume of young photographers plying their trade out there in the world – there’s bloody loads of them. The inevitable crossover of subjects and styles, techniques and typologies means it’s sometimes tricky to distinguish a great talent from an accomplished amateur. But poring over the portfolio of Swiss photographer Lukas Wassmann there’s no doubt in my mind that he’s one of the really (and I mean REALLY) good ones.

  38. List-1

    Chilean creative Mario Felipe spends his days working in commercial design at a studio called Salvaje, or Wild in English. That’s all well and good – he’s obviously a talented designer – but today we’re more concerned with the solo, fine art practice with which he fills his evenings. Mario’s a painter and mixed media collage artist who works his own abstract ideas on top of found imagery and texts. No surface is off limits, from scraps of cardboard and old family photographs to the yellowed pages of unbound works of fiction. The results are simple yet satisfying; iconic works of both geometric and organic abstract that feel playful and accessible.

  39. List

    Swedish illustrator Kilian Eng is the natural heir to the Moebius throne of staggering sci-fi artwork. In his relatively short career he’s imagined bewilderingly complex intergalactic landscapes, the architecture of numerous hypothetical civilisations, reinvigorated countless movie franchises with his reimagining of their theatre posters and worked on any number of extraordinary commercial projects too.

  40. List

    New year, new projects from the irrepressible Pentagram, this time in the form of some striking 3D work for the recently renovated and reopened Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York. Pentagram’s Michael Gericke and Eddie Opara have announced their graphic identity for the newly-expanded space, developing a physical word mark that works hard with the limitations of the listed building that houses the collection.