Introducing...

Our Introducing… feature showcases the finest new talent working in the creative industries and helps you get to know them and their work a little better.

  1. Braulio-list

    When you move to New York to pursue a career in design, it’s a foregone conclusion that you’re going to have to reside in Brooklyn. That’s where all the creativity happens. And so it was for Portuguese graphic designer and illustrator Braulio Amado, who’s been based in Brooklyn and working for the likes of Pentagram for the last couple of years.

  2. Bl-list

    London-based ceramicist Billy Lloyd has been making quite a name for himself since setting up his own studio in 2011. A graduate of Camberwell College of Art, Billy spent five years following education honing his craft through apprenticeships with local practitioners, improving his throwing skills and refining his design sensibilities. As a result his aesthetic is immensely polished for a relatively young designer, each piece handled with masterful care and attention.

  3. Main

    Rand Renfrow’s illustration is dreamy — squiggles, plants, computers, vases and Pokemon characters make up his wonderful brain-spillings. We wanted to ask him a few questions about his work process out of sheer curiosity. Turns out Rand is almost exactly how you’d image he’d be — happy, enthusiastic and just the right amount of weird.

  4. Tom-rainford-list

    Animator and illustrator Tom Rainford only graduated from Winchester Art School a couple of years ago, but the showreel he sent in whirled us away with its original characters, confident colours and lovely rhythms. After sharpening his craft for a year at London animation studio Art & Graft Tom’s wisely headed to the countryside to make animation magic far from the madding crowd.

  5. List

    Sam Island is a freelance illustrator based in Toronto, Canada whose clean-line reductive illustrations have won him the favour of the biggest names in news and editorial. A regular contributor to The New York Times, Bloomberg View and The New Yorker, Sam spends his days creating crisp, witty editorial illustrations that perfectly complement the articles they sit with. He understands only too well the necessity of communicating swiftly and effectively among endless column inches.

  6. List

    When you’re stuck on a long-haul flight with nothing to do there’s a number of options at your disposal to keep you occupied – in-flight movies, a light-hearted paperback, casual flirting with your neighbour and the imbibing of as many free drinks as the flight attendants will allow are all welcome distractions from the fact that you’re giving the middle finger to nature as you cruise through the sky on manufactured wings. Almost never (unless avoiding conversation with the drunk flirt next to you) will you turn to the glossy waste of paper rammed into the pocket of the chair in front, as in-flight magazines are notorious for their shamelessly tedious content and woeful lack of imaginative design.

  7. Main

    We came across Luc’s work a few weeks ago and didn’t know what to make of it, apart from knowing that we were certainly intrigued. Luc’s canvases tend to be pretty abstract, using the space around them to influence how you perceive the visuals actually on them. Experimenting with smoke machines, cameras and condiments, Luc’s methods are refreshingly unforced, and through a series of experiments he is building up an impressive collection of paintings that, as a series, are pretty beautiful. Luc was kind enough to answer a few questions about what he does.

  8. Palladino-list

    If you think of watercolours as a weekend pastime for geriatric dandies or the novelty pursuit of wealthy ladies that lunch then think again. Californian artist Matthew Palladino is breathing much-needed life into this long overlooked medium. Where once there were subdued colour palettes and picturesque landscapes, Matthew has created luminous abstracts of gradient colour and richly detailed representations of strange and exotic fabrics. The scale at which he produces these works is also a far cry from the miniature watercolours of old, each one created on an enormous sheet of paper.

  9. Zulu-list

    As an illustrator it must be pretty great to have a constant source of artistic inspiration. For some people it takes a lot of reading, watching and researching to find good material from which to make work, but for Lynnie Zulu that inspiration flows freely, from her family’s heritage in Tanzania and the cultural quirks that gave her access to. Growing up in the damp, dark Scottish borders you’d expect Lynnie’s work to be reflective of her dour childhood surroundings, but it’s quite the opposite – brimming with bold, spontaneous brushstrokes and vibrant, tribal hues; the antithesis to a drab, celtic colour palette.

  10. List

    Let’s all play Sonic the Hedgehog and ride our bikes naked! Graphic designer Sebastian Koseda has an ability to produce visual communication in a way that’s always fun, intriguing, striking or simply beautiful. Recently graduated from Middlesex University, Sebastian has picked up various awards from YCN, ISTD and D&AD, and the reason for all the accolades becomes very apparent as soon as you look at the variety and strength of Sebastian’s portfolio.

  11. Listimage

    We love introducing new people to you and we’re always happy to see the creative juices positively flowing through the blood of graduates each year. And so it is with graphic designer and illustrator Abigail Burch who has recently graduated from Nottingham Trebt. Abigail grabbed our attention with her self-promotional book which allows viewers into her world, welcoming everyone with personal insights such as her love for a cup of coffee – a fondness shared only with the sound of rain and old books!

  12. Ringgenbergfoam-list

    Gerrit Rietveld Academie graduate Mathias Ringgenberg trained in graphic design but, since leaving education, has expanded his practice into disciplines rarely associated with traditional design. Equally comfortable laying out a magazine for high-end fashion publications as he is putting together a performative piece for a live audience, it’s this willingness to experiment and broaden the scope of his work that sets him apart from his peers.

  13. Main

    Space is a theme that’s been knocked about in the art and design world for a few years now, popping up everywhere in the form of triangle-riddled, photoshopped images potentially with a few deer heads thrown in for good measure. How refreshing then to see someone actually do space justice by taking an enormous amount of time to create a beautiful publication informing us mere viewers about the ins and outs of the notorious US vs Soviet Union Space Race. Tom Cole has created a publication synonymous with the rest of his work while still feeling fresh and informative and so we couldn’t wait to grill him about it…

  14. Main

    Get. Out. Of. Town. How does this man exist? Why has Sweden been hiding him from us for all of these years? If you ever watched films such as Flight of the Navigator or The Dark Crystal then this will most likely be right up your sci-fi street. Mirrored palaces at twilight, infinite skylines and tropical forest covered planets are the kind of settings you can expect from this absolute dreamweaver of an illustrator, and lots of it. There’s such a copious amount of work just spilling out of his brain, it’s like his portfolio is one of those streamers that once you start unravelling just keeps on going until eternity.

  15. List

    GUNMAD is Guðmundur Ingi Úlfarsson and Mads Freund Brunse, one Icelandic and one Danish graphic designer working together between Rekjavík and London. Stylistically these guys are at the very edge of minimal, striving for typographic purity and structural perfection, with no white space disturbed by imagery or text unless absolutely necessary.

  16. Et-list

    Cornwall-based illustrator Edward Tuckwell is only just dipping his toes in the water of commercial illustration. Having graduated from Falmouth College of Art two years ago he’s been busy adapting his print-based practice for commercial use, trading emulsion and screens for Photoshop and a stylus. In spite of his relative newcomer status Edward’s work is exceptionally polished, fusing film-noir moodiness and geometric styling to devastating effect. So naturally we wanted to find out more. Like, who really is this creative wünderkind? Where does he spend his time? How does he produce these wonderful works, and what really makes him tick? Well read on and all these pressing questions will be answered…

  17. Main

    Where to start with talking about Aidan’s work? Just like it’s difficult to express to someone how good a film is when you’re telling them about it in a pub, it’s hard to convey the sheer brilliance of Aidan’s stories with words alone. Using predominantly colour pencil and soft artists materials, Aidan tells almost Chirs Ware-like stories of shyness, human behaviour and loveliness with some magic mixed in.

  18. Lewis_10-52-52

    If you’re going to go and eat a burger, you may as well do it properly. There’s no point dodging your way around the calories and grease by making ludicrous demands like: “I’ll have the number three but without the bacon and mayonnaise please,” or the worst, “Can I get my burger without the bun?”

  19. Ramon-list

    When we first contacted Ramon Haindl he told us he was “on the road,” driving across France by day and camping in the Alps drinking cheap whisky by night. Cool we thought. But I tell you what’s even cooler – Ramon’s photographs. If you are wowed by the creativity of one new artist this week I dare you not to let it be this guy.

  20. List-mia

    It must be nice to have a really great sketch book. I’ve always had big plans for one but, no matter how great my intentions, they always end up as unfinished, coffee-stained disasters; shoved to the back of my shelf sulking in the plain embarrassment that comes with being quite so awful.

  21. Osma_list

    Osma Harvilahti is a man in high demand. The young Finnish photographer has made a name for himself shooting dreamy shots of beautiful women, ethereal landscapes and enviable interiors. His impressive 120mm images have led him to regular commissions from the magnificent Apartamento. Shooting on film has become something of a rarity in the digital age and all too often photographers rely on post-production to create the desired effect in their pictures. But Osma has crafted his own unique style by perfecting the use of a limited range of hardware and maintaining a purity of vision throughout all his work, personal and commercial.

  22. Mathislist

    Mathis Mathis Pfäffli is very, very good at what he does. And what he does is flipping great graphic design. Want proof? Right this minute he’s undertaking a residency in Chicago in which he’s paid and housed in return for creating personal work on a daily basis. Nobody gives you a house and a wage to make things unless you’re really great at it. That’s just a fact.

  23. Mblist

    When it comes to dealing with hangovers, there’s two broad approaches – softly softly with an aspirin and a cuddle or the take-no-prisoners full English breakfast blow it out the water route. As London wakes up this morning in post-Olympics grog, memories already fading and TV schedules bewilderingly bereft of judo and beach volleyball, we needed a pick-me-up and Brooklyn-based Morgan Blair’s work is just the thing. On first glance it’s the kind of technicolour blast we need, but look closer and you’ll see the delicacy in her composition and faultless skill in her execution. So it’s kind of like the big breakfast followed by a hug, which is perfect. In danger of murdering any more metaphors, we decided to find out a little more from the woman herself…

  24. Splist

    Hold the phone, Sarah Parker has just updated her website with some stunning projects that have made us go all giddy. What’s that? You don’t have a phone. Well hold your email, Sarah Parker’s just…What now? It’s not impossible. Change the settings. Oh whatever, anyway Sarah Parker’s new work is properly ace.

  25. List

    I came across the work of Phillip Dornbierer in the illustration issue of the Computer Arts Collection and had the same feeling I imagine Gold Rush pioneers had when the got the first glimpse of the telltale glint. Working under the pseudonym Yehteh, his beautiful colour-rich illustrations boast strong composition and clear, concise communication, a combination which has won him some top level clients including The New York Times and IBM. Repressing my fanboy urge I managed to ask him some questions for our Introducing… feature and he obliged by giving us an insight into his life and work…

  26. Saskia-pomeroy-list

    Working largely with printed and painted textile patterns, paper cut surfaces and abstract shapes, London-based Saskia Pomeroy’s practice is a playful and applicable creative kit of parts for illustration, fashion and design. All at once dynamic and still life, her compositions are built with reduced forms that work their way into seamlessly aesthetic groupings on the page and very successful collaborations in the real world. With a lovely body of work behind her and a recent exhibition under her belt, we asked thought her a great choice for an Introducing… feature.

  27. Golden-cosmos-list

    Since coming across Golden Cosmos – the dream team combination of illustrator-designers, Doris Freigofas and Daniel Dolz – earlier "this year:http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/golden-cosmos, we’ve never looked back. The Berlin-based duo produce an extraordinary and prolific output of primary-coloured, screenprint-style works that draw from their shared love in a carefully balanced world they’ve created for themselves.

  28. Vasmou-list

    About a week ago Alexandros Vasmoulakis (or Vasmou as he likes to be known) sent us these incredible collaged portraits created entirely from scraps of newspaper. The torn abstract shapes are carefully composited to make wonderfully striking images that suggest the visual style of regency portraiture but with pop culture and historical subjects (Cameron Diaz and Abe Lincoln anyone?). We were immediately enthralled and went straight to his website to find out more where we discovered an enormous amount of work from a man equally capable of covering a 100ft wall with paint and tiles, erecting witty 3D tableaus from household objects and composing beautifully considered works on paper. So impressed were we by the work on display that we had to interview Alex and find out more about his work, his studio and his feline obsession…

  29. Andreasengelbreckt-list

    Andreas Engelbreckt is a young Danish designer currently completing a Masters in visual communication at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. We were first drawn to his work having seen his Panneau typeface – a font that evokes the decorative letterforms of 1940s French typography – but quickly discovered an impressive body of work focussing on classic type design and branding projects. We got in touch with Andreas to find out a little bit more about his practise and have a good old snoop around his desk space.

  30. Kai-nodlund-list

    Kai Nodland’s illustrations are of the mystic persuasion. They have no little amount of charm with their intensively detailed, symbol-rich, cosmic-like compositions. They are also wonderful feats in mark making and exploration of media – from sketches to paintings the level of detail is a signifier of the artist’s evanescent imagination and wonder.

  31. Melnguyen-list

    Continuing our new feature of young creative types is Minneapolis resident Mel Win (Nguyen) a multidisciplinary artist with an incredibly engaging portfolio.

  32. Timmcdonagh-list

    It’s come to our attention that as a race, we humans are quite a nosy bunch; we like to snoop around and find things out, whether it’s our business or not (in fact even more so if it’s not). With that in mind we’ve decided to do some snooping for you, seeking out some of the finest new creative talent worldwide and asking them some probing questions about their life, their work and their daily routines. We’ll also be having a look at the spaces in which they work, from obsessively arranged desk setups to work benches covered in sawdust. And what are we dubbing this revealing new feature? Simple: Introducing. So without further ado…