Photography Archive

  1. Aishazeijpveld-whatremains-int-list

    Aisha Zeijpveld likes to toy with the viewer. She once overheard two girls discussing her work at a show, with one of them solemnly declaring that her photographs are “definitely Photoshopped.” In fact for the most part they’re not, but Aisha is an image-maker who enjoys confusing us as to what we think we’re seeing. Take her What Remains series from a couple of years ago that was inspired by Egon Schiele’s sketches and created alongside set designers Sara Ivanyi and Judith Veenendaal.

  2. Joejohnson-reno-3-int_copy

    Joe Johnson’s photo-essay The Playing Field documents Reno’s casinos in their spectacular neon glory, but completely empty. The interior architecture designed to delight, confuse and distract looks even more absurd deserted than when it’s packed with OAPs drinking Screwdrivers. Almost every surface is reflective and disorientating; those that aren’t project mountain-top lakes and seascapes.

  3. Eudes-de-santana-int-list

    Eudes de Santana’s photographic portfolio is almost suspiciously international. He has worked on commissions in London, Berlin, Cape Town and Barcelona as well as his home country of Brazil, piecing together a collection of images which are compelling and energetic, but which might lead you to believe he’s on a career-long holiday rather than busily working. On the contrary, it’s just that his clients – Zeit Magazine, Vice, Nike and Sony are known all over the world, giving him more-than-legit cause to travel to wherever the work is. And can you blame him?

  4. Larry-clark-int-list-2

    There are dream collaborations, and then there are those that seem to good to be true but happen anyway, which is probably the category we’d pop Larry Clark and J.W. Anderson in. The pair have gotten together to create a new book entitled The Smell of Us, which features the cast of Larry’s new film (of the same name) running riot around Paris, hanging out in hotel rooms in their pants and generally having the time of their lives, in a host of J.W. Anderson creations. Anderson’s stripy 1960s details give a happily retro vibe to Larry’s compositions, thrusting the cast into an era which reeks of greasy hair, fumbling encounters round the back of the Palais de Tokyo and that conspicuous trail of baccy in jeans back pockets.

  5. Garywallis-mcqueen-int-list

    There’s a wave of adoration sweeping across London for Alexander McQueen at the moment, almost exactly five years after his untimely death in 2010, and it feels something like a homecoming. This is due in no small part to the upcoming showing of Savage Beauty, an exhibition of his life’s work which was first seen at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art four years ago, and which will open at the V&A on 14 March with a wealth of new exhibits.

  6. Euan-int-main

    Before I begin can I just say that what you see in these photos is not LARP (Live Action Role Play), it’s SCA which stands for The Society for Creative Anachronism. The difference is where LARP is more playful, going out with your mates wearing costumes and wearing padding and bashing each other on the head, SCA is actually recreating aspects of primarily Medieval history down to the smallest detail in trams of craftsmanship. A bit like a theatrical production, but with jousting.

  7. Caitoppermann-bangkok-int-list-2

    Sifting through holiday snaps is generally a pleasure – all that sniggering at old men in questionable swimming trunks and cooing over exotic birdlife – but this enjoyment is at least 80% greater when the traveller is a photographer, and 10% more again when it’s Cait Oppermann. The Brooklyn-based image-maker has an observing eye which allows her to pick up on the details others might miss – like odd happenings at a US sex convention, for example, or a mirrored ceiling in a derelict shopping mall and she found Bangkok to be in no short supply of such interesting corners.

  8. Stefaniemoshammer-int-main

    “Las Vegas is the strip club capital of the world,” says Stefanie Moshammer, an Austrian photographer whose recent project led her to the underbelly of Nevada’s shimmering city. Stefanie began work on a series called Vegas and She, in which she documents strippers, nightclubs, and various bits and bobs that represent Las Vegas culture: bright pink limos, dust trails, palm trees, and diving boards into sapphire pools.

  9. Neilbedfordgsj-classicfootballshirts-int-list

    All football fans have a fetishistic relationship with the shirts that runs deeper than simple affirmations of tribal loyalty. We obsess over the exact shades of colours, the detailing on the cuffs, and the stitching on the crest – and most of us can vividly remember how certain shirts smelled (is this getting weird?). Anyway a new project from the chaps over at The Green Soccer Journal celebrates this relationship between fan and jersey in a new series of photos shot by their long-term collaborator Neil Bedford. Occasionally we glimpse a club name or badge but this is more universal than that and the close-ups in particular speak to the intensity of our addictions.

  10. Andreaalquati-fukushima-3-int_copy

    Andrea Bonisoli Alquati has been researching and photographing the ecological effects of nuclear disasters since 2007. First, he was doing so in Chernobyl and since 2012 he’s photographed in Fukushima’s exclusion zone, where as part of his PhD research he assesses the health and condition of individual animals, populations and community dynamics in the area.

  11. Gaeanwoods-int-main

    Gaea Woods caught our eye the other day with the portraits she took of her friend Samantha, seemingly covered all over in Vaseline. A bit of research led us to finding out that Gaea is actually a photographer with a whole host of talents under her belt, particularly when it comes to shooting things really close-up. Gaea was born in rural northern California and now resides in LA, where she’s making her career as a photographer.

  12. Wailin-editorial-7-int_copy

    Photographer Wai Lin Tse’s portfolio balances dewy, sun-kissed babes with photographs of plants and chubby-cheeked kids. It’s quite the melting pot and can be seen in editorials for Lula, The Plant and Apartamento magazine. Lin’s photographs are impeccably-lit and somehow both poised and quite tongue-in-cheek. She seems equally comfortable shooting landscapes as she is people, perhaps partially down to the fact that she is based in both Stockholm and Barcelona and surely taking lots of exciting cross-continent road trips.

  13. _thom-atkinson-guy-the-gorilla_-natural-history-museum-int-list

    Removed from their cabinets, museum pieces take on a strange quality. Once the glass is gone, some of their mystique goes too; and they feel almost like everyday things to be used and touched, rather than alien relics to be admired. It’s this disorientating new quality that’s captured so beautifully in Thom Atkinson’s series Museums, showing pieces from the Wellcome Trust and National History Museum collections.

  14. List-adrian_skenderovic_down_the_river-15

    There’s something very peaceful, but slightly voyeuristic about Adrian Skenderovic’s series Down the River. The photographs show the bateaux-mouches tourist boats that gently cruise down the River Seine in Paris, but here the spectacle isn’t the Louvre or Notre Dame, but the tourists themselves. It really awakens our nosey nature seeing the little bald heads and bathing ladies from above, and creating our own narratives about what might be happening on these seemingly serene vessels, with the colours and perspective helping us float along with the subjects. Last time we posted about Adrian’s work it was to showcase his brilliant series of images of lonely basketball hoops, and it seems he has a knack for taking objects that feel familiar and totally shifting our take on them.

  15. Boyhood-interview-2-int_copy

    In case you’ve been living under a rock for the last 25 years, and missed last night’s Oscars ceremony (congratulations Patricia!) Richard Linklater is an Austin-based filmmaker who until recently would have been best-known for coming of age classic Dazed and Confused, the Before trilogy or School of Rock. That is, until the release of Boyhood.

  16. Yenertorun-int-list

    Yener Torun is a 32 year-old architect who has turned Istanbul into the geographical equivalent of Aladdin’s cave of wonders. Tucked away among the beautiful Ottoman and Byzantine architecture and the blue Bosphorus are a wealth of impossibly bright buildings dominated by geometric patterns, rainbow hues and funny architectural idiosyncrasies. And through his Instagram account, Yener has been slowly but steadily documenting it all.

  17. Charlotterutherford-fashed-4-int

    Charlotte Rutherford’s photography is fun, bright and tinged with humour and 1980s sass. Shooting editorial for the likes of Vice and Tank magazine and look-books for Lazy Oaf and Baby G, the self-taught photographer maintains an aesthetic that is both well-informed and original. She cites David LaChapelle and Pierre et Gilles as major influences on her work, saying that they prove the encouraging dictum “OK cool, you can do like ANYTHING.” I couldn’t agree more.

  18. Hipgnosis-portraits-p193-int-list

    You can almost smell the creativity, hash and late late nights behind the images in Hipgnosis Portraits. Or perhaps that’s just the super-shiny, huge full-colour pages. Either way, the enormous tome from Thames & Hudson transports you into a world of surreal scenes formed of surreal characters, taking us into the archives of the Hipgnosis design agency that helped form the mythologies surrounding some of the biggest names in music in the 20th Century.

  19. Labadie-van-tour-pool-intlist

    Few things look quite as fun as floating about in a big blue pool, surrounded by those foam wiggly things right now. The moustachioed gent above, reclining in the water, was shot as part of photographic duo Labadie / Van Tour’s Pool series for a Vers Beton magazine feature about Rotterdam’s public swimming pools.

  20. Bgm-int-list

    Blair Getz Mezibov is the photographer responsible for taking men, mere mortal men, and transforming them into what are essenetially demi-gods. Case in point, here’s some of his refined editorial work for glossy magazines like GQ Style, Rollacoaster magazine and Out magazine, elevating models to immaculately poised and dapper gents caught mid-swing in a game of tennis, or perhaps leaning nonchalantly over the back of a director’s chair, looking like they’ve been carved from marble.

  21. Izumimiyazaki-main-int

    Life can be pretty boring when you’re a teenager. Rather than turning to the gory allure of video games and SnapChat, 18-year-old Izumi Miyazaki decided to take matters into her own hands and make a series of selfies that make yours look absolutely rubbish. By utilising household items and foodstuffs as props, and sometimes going as far as building her own sets (see head in the clouds photos below) Izumi transports herself into far off lands, so far off that they’re on a different world entirely. Her fixed, deadpan stare throughout makes the project not just endearing but also worth much more than if she was just larking about. It’s art, man. FYI she also sells badges and other small merch items – get ’em while you can.

  22. Closeyoureyes-list-1

    Close Your Eyes, the newest publication from Northern Ireland-born and London-based photographer Gareth McConnell, is one of those books which seems to boil history down and to present it for inspection. Gareth describes it as a “frenzied reworking” of his accumulated archive; it brings together over ten years worth of photographs of rave culture, of civil gatherings and of riots, all of which is placed side-by-side with found imagery from the internet, shots from historical moments and personal and political perspectives. 

  23. Anastasiakorostevla-classmates-main-int

    This post comes by way of submission from young Russian photographer Anastasia Korosteleva. You may have seen her Girls series over on Dazed in which she burnt out the faces of the subjects of her dream-like photographs. This series entitled Classmates takes Anastasia to sunny East London in South Africa where she turns her lens to school kids. Once you get past how fantastic their uniforms are, and that feeling of nostalgic schoolyard bliss has passed, notice just how fantastic Anastasia is at contrasting the primary colour uniforms against the stark, school-y backgrounds. Also worth noting is how clever she is to not make the project cutesy in the slightest, but just a study of a group of innocent, cheeky mini adults.

  24. Tom-blachford-midnight-modern-list

    Some very simple pleasures here from photographer Tom Blachford, who’s been staying up long past his bedtime to capture stunning architectural shots. The Australian photographer’s been hard at it in California photographing the state’s mid-century modernist buildings by moonlight. The long-exposure shots frame each angular structure in an atmospheric glow that evokes the glamorous film sets of a bygone era. They speak for themselves really; they’re beauties. Enough said.

  25. Gareth-phillips-hiraeth-int-2

    More than 900 miles of coastline, 70 days and a restoration of faith in human nature have gone into making photographer Gareth Phillips’ stunning series, Hiraeth. Gareth came by the studio last week to show his work, and to tell us the wonderful story of how, following a vicious attack out in Cardiff, he set off alone to walk the length of the coastline of his Wales homeland. In the middle of winter. The idea, he says, was to “explore what my homeland of Wales meant to me in relation to the Welsh word hiraeth.”

  26. Mosaert-lookbook-int-list

    If like me you were regularly dragged off to your local Olan Mills photographic studio as a child to have family portraits taken of you and your siblings looking unusually clean and composed in front of a dappled background, you might be similarly drawn to Mosaert’s new lookbook. Carefully constructed like the most stylish family pics, they feature a whole bunch of models immaculately robed in Mosaert’s bright new collection, and there’s something innately compelling about them.

  27. Showstudio-pinups-int-list

    Nick Knight’s SHOWstudio has pioneered what might be called the “photoshoot-plus” approach, combining his exceptionally-executed stills work with innovative and engaging extras that push the creative potential of his work into thrilling territory. He recently collaborated with Sophia Neophitou, editor-in-chief of 10 magazine and one of the brains behind the now legendary Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, on a series called Pin-ups which “riffs on the traditional codes and motifs of erotic imagery, from fishnets to silk.”

  28. Zacarc-carshow-5-int_copy

    In the series Looking at Cars photographer Zak Arctander has shot the hosts and clientele of a suburban American car show. Zak says that he aims for a balance of “magic and dread” in his work which here is exemplified by the dully inquisitive expressions of the people attending the show. In a state of over-consumption, they are clearly focussed while being pretty much dead behind the eyes. Delightful.

  29. List

    LA-based creative Eddie O’Keefe is principally a filmmaker – he produces stunning homages to early 1960s American culture – but his photographic work is a sight to behold. Firmly rooted in the past and bubbling seductively with sun-kissed Americana, Eddie focusses his lens on subjects as mundane as car windscreens and old chairs (and of course, the odd blood-soaked cheerleader), gently persuading you that you’re viewing a record of an era when your parents were out on the razzle. Sure, the cynic in me thinks that there’s a legion of Intagrammers who think they’re making this kind of heady, nostalgic artwork on a daily basis, but Eddie’s the real deal, he’s recreating this grainy, seductive world for himself, and this is the good stuff!

  30. Bexday-int-list

    If you can resist a photoshoot in which two bikers who belong to the 59 Club whip their denim off and get cosy in and around London’s iconic biker spot Ace Café, then you’re a stronger person than I am. I came across this masterpiece by photographer Bex Day yesterday afternoon, and it’s so charged with hairy, sunny, smiley biker love that I’m tempted to print images out and stick them around to remind myself how great life is.

  31. Nicolascoulomb-novembre-13-int

    Photographer Nicolas Coulomb shoots fresh-faced ethereal babes in very cool clothes and exciting settings. There are hay-stack discos, olympic pools and what appears to be the set of Logan’s Run transported to a European spa town. We’ve posted Nicolas’ work before: he’s been producing look-books, magazine editorials and backstage explorations of taxidermy museums for the likes of Dazed, Novembre and Etudes. In this editorial for Novembre Magazine Nicolas has collaborated with editor Florence Tétier, who he often works with through the stages of concept development. In this story set amongst Corinthian columns and very dramatic steps, a pair of sun-drenched dreamboats contemplate life, pouts and neck-ties while wearing incredible 70s shirts.

  32. Brucegilden-womenofwallstreet-int-list

    “I’m known for taking pictures very close,” photographer Bruce Gilden’s website proclaims, “and the older I get, the closer I get.” He’s not lying – famous for street photography made using a flashgun, his work is unashamedly intrusive, searingly honest, and incredibly effective. Which made him a perfect selection by Vice to shoot the Women of Wall Street series for their Wall Street issue. The photographs he took of New York’s most powerful women show up every pore, every burst capillary, every clump of mascara and every split end, and they’re oddly vilifying for it. No matter how much you want to root for the under-represented women holding their own in an environment where 80% of executives are running almost entirely on caffeine and testosterone, Bruce manages to depict them as alien warriors about to step into battle.

  33. Davidbgeeting-fashion-7-int_copy

    While we’ve posted about David Brandon Geeting a few times before, his new work sees the wry aesthetic shown in his context-defying still-life shots applied to the realm of fashion photography. The figures, clothes and surrounding objects share the compositional weight and contextual absence of his still-life work, the models are very much sculptural parts rather than the stars of any image.

  34. Maggie-shannon-swamp-yankee-int-list

    26-year-old Brooklyn photographer Maggie Shannon has just been touted as one of Magnum’s 30 under 30 – which given the prestige of the organisation is no mean feat. A quick flick through her portfolio confirms Magnum’s assertion that she’s a talented image-maker, but there’s one project in particular that stopped me dead in my tracks. Tucked in among the intimate portraits of strangers and documentary-style images of female musicians at work was the lifeless head of a shark staring blankly back at me.

  35. Charliekwai-pc-6-int_copy

    London-based street photographer Charlie Kwai has dedicated a whole year to documenting the crossroads at Piccadilly Circus. The busy interchange – home to passing commuters, tired shoppers and ‘whelmed tourists – makes for a great subject for cataloguing a cross-section of people, behaviour and street food etiquette.

  36. Emilystein-tobago-main-int

    From the talented woman who brought you photographs of teenagers going nuts in mosh pits and kids blowing bubblegum comes a new and somewhat more reserved series entitled Tobago. Emily Stein headed out to the tiny, remote Caribbean island with her camera and snapped a small series in a bid to create a portrait of the young people who reside there. The collection is cheerful and informative: from the charming school uniform donned by the teenage girls, to the cool cereal packaging on the shelf of a supermarket – each photo oozes a bliss only found in the carefree period of adolescence. It’s a succulent glimpse into a place you may well never get around to visiting, and more proof that Emily is a rising star in the photographic world.

  37. Jussipuikkonen-florentijnhoffman-int-list

    To my mind, a career in editorial photography is akin to living the dream: you hang out at home in your pyjamas waiting for a phone call informing you that you’ll be sent halfway around the world to photograph some enormously talented, charismatic character, and be put up in five star hotels and business class all the way. I recognise that more than likely the opposite is true: it’s a skanky mouldy flat, you’re put on the number 55 bus to shoot somebody who lives down the road, and there’s neither a five star hotel nor a plane anywhere in sight. Still, the breadth of brilliant people to photograph is there, and that’s enough to incite envy in even the most satisfied of people.

  38. Lee-crichton-cod-main-int

    “C.O.D is what it says on the tin,” says Lee Crichton, editor and creator of Collection of Documentaries – a weighty tome celebrating a gritty adoration of British culture. “The magazine started off as me thinking I wanted to recreate The Face, which obviously was impossible. I starting researching British-inspired magazines and thought there was a gap to create something new and fresh. I then got in touch with Sheryl Garrett of The Face for advice on how to put such a publication together.”

  39. Granadilla-swim-71-620x413_copy

    Jake Singer is an artist predominantly interested in architecture and how people interact with built space. Just on the side of this practice, he’s also knocking out some great fashion photography. Describing this work as “just really fun and casual,” and mostly projects he does with friends, Jake’s photographs combine high production values with wit that plays up the “blue steel” tradition so prevalent in collection lookbooks.

  40. Larkfoord-parts-6-int

    Lark Foord photographs details, whether they be the back ends of rusty old bangers, suburban hedgerows or the textures of buildings and street furniture. His project Parts is like a visual record of the glory days of the automobile industry. There are station-wagons, hand-painted hoods depicting beach scenes and love-worn racing numbers, matte gold paint and a general air of the 70s.