Photography Archive

  1. Davidtitlow-damonalbarn-int

    This year’s open submission Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize was awarded to London-based photographer David Titlow for a photograph of his toddler son. The photograph, if you haven’t seen it, is a hazy, Vermeer-esque image of David’s hungover friends on the morning after a party, passing his new son around in the cold light of the Swedish sun. Back on UK soil, David’s work couldn’t be more different. He seems to be something of a darling of the glossies: snapping models and celebs for the likes of Vanity Fair, Esquire, Nylon and Marie Claire. His impulsive, confident shots are a far cry from his tender, voyeuristic personal work – which is why we wanted to ask him a few questions about what he does. Here he is…

  2. Asger_carlsen-nymagthecut-int

    The annually ubiquitous words “resort collection” evoke whiffs of Campari and orange, sunset-lit terraces in The Hamptons, a suitcase of freshly pressed, pastel daywear. That’s why we were rather surprised when New York Magazine’s fashion branch The Cut decided to commission Asger Carlsen to help show off 2015’s sartorial offerings. Asger is a Danish artist living and working in New York, and is the go-to man for distorted, nightmare-like monochromatic images that have the power to send bolts of nerves fleetingly through your teeth.

  3. Wesleyverhoeve-oneofmany-int-8-jess-denver

    I don’t mean to show off, but I’ve met quite a few Americans, and I often ask them about the creative scene in the USA. More specifically I’m interested in whether it’s possible to elucidate any recurring themes or general characteristics in such a huge, diverse country. Most of them, bluntly but politely, say that no, no it’s not. What a ridiculous question. Get out my car. So to study American creativity is actually to study its individual outposts, and that’s where Wesley Verhoeve’s One Of Many project comes in.

  4. Arthurdrooker-merfest-main-int

    Cool Hunting used to be a place of current art and design, expensive watches, exclusive booze bottles, leather mountaineering accessories and cars you will never be able to afford. Nowadays it’s a place of exotic content nestled snugly in a brand new redesign that’s pretty ahead of the game. Recently it’s been championing the work of an American photographer called Arthur Drooker, largely focusing on his series entitled Conventional Wisdom. Arthur is something of a curiosity-lover, and his wild, weird series are the visual result of him being unable to resist the pull of “Bronies,” ventriloquists, clowns, re-enactors and taxidermists.

  5. Marcokesseler-outtakes-11-int

    We featured Marco Kesseler’s This Land Of Ours That Is Not Ours series last summer. The project forms a portrait of the street clashes in Kiev between government forces and the pro-European movement, documenting the tensions that led up to the riots, seemingly mundane domestic details and the broader architectural setting of the uprising.

  6. Tilljanz-olafur-list-int

    Remember back in July 2013 I said that photographer Till Janz was making a pretty impressive name for himself in the portrait photography business? Well, not to toot my own trumpet, but look who he’s been shooting lately. A-list Hollywood filmmaker Spike Jonze, check; king of the modern art world Olafur Eliasson, check; exclusive editorials for 032c, covers for Zeit Magazin and campaigns for Nike; check, check, check. It’s also worth mentioning he only got seven minutes for all those shots of Mr. Jonze. Anyway, needless to say the boy’s done good, and it’s great to watch him progress into the big leagues. Toot toot!

  7. Stephenshames-bronx_boys-list

    If the photographs in Stephen Shames’ series Bronx Boys don’t seem to sit comfortably alongside the funny, shareable, imagined-one-day-and-shot-the next photographic projects which we are so accustomed to seeing on the internet, then that’s because they don’t. Rather, Bronx Boys is the product of 23 years spent photographing a group of people living in the Bronx, New York City, and the photographs were taken not to garner likes or shares, but to publicise the plight of one of the poorest areas in NYC.

  8. Thomasprior-handball-list-3-int

    Thomas Prior is one of those sneaky names who first crept onto our radar with a stunning series documenting a firework fight in Tultepec, Mexico, and has since reappeared at six-monthly intervals with new and ever more adventurous projects from around the world. There was February last year, for example, when he photographed the YouTube awards for Vice magazine, and then a few months later he cropped up again with this brilliant series of images taken in Greece and Turkey for Afar magazine.

  9. List

    Andy Sewell’s new book Something Like a Nest is an archetypal portrayal of middle class Britishness, and it’s a picturesque, sentimental and charming one at that. To our delight, he steers clear of stereotypes and tired clichés – there are no weather-worn farmers nor Wellington boots in here, no sir – and instead creates a clear and honest portrait of country life. Placing perfectly centred shots of kitchen sinks and surrounding phenomena (plants, hand-soap, Fairy Liquid) alongside images of the English countryside coated in frost and glittering in the sun and frogspawn in Kilner jars, it’s enough to make even the most steely-hearted of expats teary-eyed.

  10. List

    If you were to search for a photographer who defines that gorgeous hazy middle ground between sleep and wakefulness, Marcelo Gomes would without a doubt be your best bet. He has built a career on creating images imbued with the kind of indistinct beauty that makes all of his subjects look about 50% more ethereal, nailing that dreamy aesthetic where so many photographers stumble.

  11. List-ph

    If you want to be a great photographer, it’s all about “integrity,” “dedication” and a “strong self belief about what you’re trying to produce,” according to a man who knows better than most: photographer, curator and founder of contemporary photographic art magazine Next Level, Sheyi Bankale.

  12. List

    It’s rare that old age is really celebrated, let alone portrayed in a fashion that makes it look like fun, but street photographer Michelle Groskopf’s shots of oldies captured in Larchmont, USA are a different story altogether. These guys seem to be having a blast; they’re cheeky, glamorous and charismatic. The series doesn’t just focus its lens on the over-60s of this Los Angeles suburb, there are teenagers, young mums and suited businessmen too, but the photos of the older generation are refreshingly cheerful, so here they are edited down for your enjoyment.

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    On New Year’s Eve in 1965, photographer Lisetta Carmi met and photographed a group of transvestites living and working on the Via de Campo in Genoa, Italy. It was the beginning of a seven year relationship with the group, considered outsiders by Italian society, and led to the publication of I Travestiti, an incredibly controversial book of all the images Lisetta took over this stretch of time. Now, almost 50 years later, Jacopo Benassi, a photographer already famed for his work documenting prostitution and gay culture, has retraced Lisetta’s original steps, tracking down the two remaining subjects from that body of Lisetta’s work – Rossella and Ursula.

  14. List

    French-born, New York-based photographer Franck Bohbot shoots public spaces with an eye for the cinematic. His studies of empty cinemas, parks and unusually deserted Manhattan streets hang in the balance between documentary and fiction in depictions of the widely mythologised East Coast twilight and West Coast sun.

  15. List

    Of all the places to for a mooch about, a cactus nursery has to be one of the nicest choices out there. What better way is there to spend a weekend afternoon than surrounded by curtains of luscious foliage, tables and tables covered in stout green plants and with a couple of charming aficionados to teach you everything they know about botany? India Hobson’s series taken inside Abbey Brook Cactus Nursery is a testament to the fact; she documents the peculiar Englishness of the greenhouse garden with a gentle watchfulness, shooting the plants as though they were tiny green spiky aliens to be observed curiously through her lens. This is just one of a bunch of wonderful projects on her site, from shoots for The Garden Edit and Kinfolk, proving that we’re not the only ones to admire her talent.

  16. List

    The term “ruin porn” gets thrown around a lot to describe images of abandoned buildings and architectural forms that have fallen into disrepair. The Atlantic have published essays on the psychological reasons we’re incapable of tearing our eyes from it, and Detroit has become the poster city for this captivating genre of destructive, bleak photography – in fact it seems to be a genre that’s almost exclusively American.

  17. Newshine_black_tropicana_06_copy

    The enduring impression I had that I’d made pretty acceptable use of my BA time has been shattered by Chloe Newman and Rebecca Scheinberg’s high production, hyper-real photographic analyses of consumer culture. Having graduated from BA Photography at LCC last summer, Chloe and Rebecca’s work holds both a consistent quality and an interest in fragmented narratives of order, chaos and commodity value.

  18. Main

    It was hard to go through Justin Fantl’s portfolio and hone in on just one project: his enormous selection of intriguing photographic series is vast enough to get lost in for at least an hour or two. Be it the wild, weird attractions of Vegas, the Mars-like landscape of Death Valley, fluffy dogs, dinosaur bones, Iceland, crowds, mini golf – you name it, Justin’s got a great collection of pictures of it.

  19. List

    Sometimes I confess I’m overwhelmed by the sheer volume of young photographers plying their trade out there in the world – there’s bloody loads of them. The inevitable crossover of subjects and styles, techniques and typologies means it’s sometimes tricky to distinguish a great talent from an accomplished amateur. But poring over the portfolio of Swiss photographer Lukas Wassmann there’s no doubt in my mind that he’s one of the really (and I mean REALLY) good ones.

  20. List

    If you share a studio with a friend or a co-worker and happen to be reading this on your lunch break, please take a moment to flash them an affectionate glance. Why, you ask? Because if anything can help you to view your relationship differently, it’s photographer Geray Mena with this sweet series Atelier.

  21. Main

    Fate dealt us a good hand a few weeks back, while we were searching for a portrait of Raymond Briggs to accompany an interview we did with him in the latest Printed Pages. The best one we found, one that summed up the temperament of Raymond effortlessly, was by a photographer called Toby Glanville. A quick look at his site confirmed that Toby was a very, very good photographer, with a strong body of work that seems to hold a style, a smell, and a vibe. Toby kindly allowed us to use his portrait of Raymond for the magazine, and to find out a little bit more about his exquisite photography, we asked him a few questions. Here he is on the art a good portrait, his top three photographers and that day he spent with Raymond…

  22. List

    There are coffee table books, and then there are huge, fantastic publications so weighty that they’re likely to shunt your table a couple of inches closer to the floor, as in the case of this staggering beauty by TASCHEN. The Rolling Stones is a 518-page testament to the incredible wealth of photographs that have been taken of the iconic band over the course of their 50 year career, and it’s breathtaking.

  23. List

    I occasionally forget how incredibly dependent I am on photojournalism to provide a context to articles I’m reading, especially when said articles deal with ideas formulated by experts who’ve spent decades researching subjects I can barely even pronounce. Producing this photographic re-contextualisation is kind of Alexi Hobbs’ job, when he’s commissioned by media giants like Monocle and TIME to provide imagery that explains their articles. And fortunately for them and us alike, he’s very very good at it.

  24. Main

    The seventh issue of the spectacular online photography journal Accent Magazine is here. Pieced together by Lydia Garnett and Lucy Nurnberg, the pair source some of the best young photographers working today and accept submissions of image-based stories from each one to collate into a temporary online space. This issue is truly spellbinding: the stories are even more poignant, the photography is even more crisp and jaw dropping. Personally I find that it can be hard to concentrate on reading a whole printed magazine in one go, but something about this corner of the internet allows me to get stuck in immediately and devour it. Well worth a good half an hour of your time if you can give it. A huge congrats to Lucy and Lydia, again!

  25. List

    Driving around Johannesburg early in the mornings, photographer Marc Shoul was puzzled by the number of domestic workers he saw out walking their employers’ dogs. “The complexion of servitude is pretty obvious in the city, even as things change,” he explains. “When I see domestic workers, some in uniform, walking their owners’ dogs, it is hard not to reflect on how unaffected the rituals of suburban affluence are during this period of seismic urban change.”

  26. List

    There’s always something a little strange about parades. For us, they ignite a confused sort of excitement and delight in the voyeurism of looking on at others united for a cause, never entirely certain what’s going on, never totally engaged with the pageantry and accoutrements and singularity of the gathered crowd’s purpose. This sense is captured perfectly in Holly Falconer’s stunning photographic series Parade, in which she documents a little-known celebration called the Neston Ladies Day parade. The annual march sees women and girls take to the streets of the Cheshire town on the first Thursday of June, in a procession featuring a banner bearing the phrase: “Bear Ye One Another’s Burdens.”

  27. List-2

    Despite the decriminalisation of homosexuality in Russia in 1993, current president Vladimir Putin’s apparent determination to pass laws which oppress gay rights and stigmatise the LGBT community seem to exert a pressure on gay people there that feels a long way away from the comparatively liberal UK. Which is partly why, in the run up to the Sochi Olympics, photographer Isabella Moore undertook a project in which she traveled across Russia photographing those who felt these effect of these laws most intensely. The photographs are intimate and touching; taken in the subjects’ homes and capturing moments of tender affection, they hammer home the frightening reality of movements of oppression, and the important role of photographic journalism in making people aware of it.

  28. List-2

    Alexander Coggin’s photographs remind me of those scenes in sci-fi films when you see everything from the perspective of an extra-terrestrial who’s just landed on Earth for the first time. A master of the white balance, he somehow manages to cast a coolly detached, slightly surreal light over the everyday domestic scenes that pervade his portfolio, making everything from a green marble sink to a tray of readymade hors d’oeuvres seem completely new and slightly out of touch. He’s just updated his website with loads of new work which proves my point adeptly. See more from him here.

  29. List

    Whenever we’ve featured Nick Ballon on the site in the past, we’ve tended to focus on his self-initiated projects such as his terrific study of a Bolivian airline or his work in the weird world of wrestling. However Nick is also a super-talented editorial photographer and his portraits for the likes of the The Sunday Times and The Guardian’s weekend supplements are well worth exploring.

  30. List

    Judging by the photographs she was commissioned to take for Bloomberg Businessweek, Stephanie Gonot and American radio show host Jesse Thorn were a seriously good match. She was commissioned by the publishing giants to photograph Bullseye founder Jesse, and where many would have fallen into that chic, perfectly polished and occasionally dull trap that portrait photographers so often have to skirt around, she succeeded in steering well clear and opted to capture him larking about instead; gesticulating wildly in his office, sitting in a giant banana (?) and photographing the view from his desk.

  31. List

    Grant Cornett is an effing (no swearing here, thank you) good photographer. Really EFFING good. The Brooklyn-based image-maker has been plying his trade in New York for just over a decade, creating work that’s incredibly broad. Within his vast portfolio lives immaculate food photography, still-life fashion shoots, a plethora of punchy magazine covers and some stellar portraiture. It’s too much to hope to encapsulate in a single post so for the meantime feast your eyes on these portraits of faces – some famous, some not so – all given the Grant Cornett treatment and exquisitely immortalised.

  32. List

    You know when you go on holiday and you’re so keen to make the most of every view that you walk around with your iPhone glued to your hand? That, in essence, is the subject of this brilliant series by Catherine Hyland, who was last on the site when she photographed a dilapidated theme park in China back in 2012. It is slightly more complicated than that however, as she explains; the series looks to draw attention to the “cultural concepts of landscape deeply embedded in the development of contemporary leisure sites.”

  33. List

    Edmund Clark is one of the most interesting artists working today, exploring what is arguably the defining issue of the past 13 years. He’s interested in the wars waged by the USA and UK in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the fall-out from this foreign policy and how it impacts on us here at home. His new book The Mountains of Majeed continues this theme, as it’s a reflection on “the end of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan through photography, found imagery and Taliban poetry.”

  34. List

    When those from the music world travel into the art world, their journeys can result in somewhat mixed creative results. Some musicians, like Ronnie Wood, move into rather grotesque paintings, while Dean Blunt regularly fills Hackney’s Space gallery with baffling images (like these strange Evisu jeans emblem-based works) and The Specials bassist Horace Panter likes painting robots. As such, we find some of the outcomes of this tricky transition are perhaps less accomplished than others – a mixtape you listen to with one finger firmly on the “skip” button, if you will.

  35. Listy

    Tom Johnson strikes me as a photographer who captures the people and the places around him as they actually are, not as he would like them to look so as to fit simply and stylishly into his portfolio. His work spans portraiture and documentary photography – he once bought a 1980s motorhome and travelled up and down the UK photographing the people he came across – and touches distant edges of the population, from female bodybuilders and transvestites to a clan of Peckham’s sapeurs. He’s currently looking to merge the three areas of his practice into one, with new commissions for The New British and VICE pushing him to new territory and to photograph evermore fascinating characters.

  36. List

    “Eventually everything connects – people, ideas, objects..the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.” Charles Eames’ quotation opens this impressive book designed by Annahita Kamali and Florian Böhm for Vitra, an (almost) entirely visual celebration of the legendary designer though an intriguing selection of images. It’s a curious publication but one that really works, with each image connecting to the next in sometimes extremely subtle ways. As Eckhart Nickel writes in the book’s introductory essay: “We are transported by little, precious elements in every image that correspond to a detail in the next one, creating a kind of hide-and-seek for the traces that design leaves in our life and the ones life leaves in design.”

  37. List

    We had the pleasure of meeting up with photographer Adrià Cañameras in Barcelona at the beginning of the year, when he was excitedly telling us about a collection of photographs entitled Anna et Salomé that he was hoping to publish in book form. Now, almost four seasons down the line, the book has just been published by Lawson’s Books and we can confirm that it’s as much of a treat as we’d anticipated. Collating a selection of images taken by Adrià at different places around the Mediterranean, the book makes reference to his French and Spanish heritage in the form of a serene, considered ode to the summer. With commissions under his belt for Apartamento, Dazed Magazine and the New York Times already, Anna et Salomé is a calm counterpart to much of Adriàs portfolio. We’re looking forward to seeing what he does next.

  38. List

    As people who produce our own magazine, the hunt for great regular features is a constant one. So when we come across a belter in someone else’s publication, our admiration is spiked with a little envy. That’s how I felt when I saw the new Christie’s magazine (edited by Jeremy Langmead and designed by B.A.M. London) and came across the beautifully simple Collectors & Collections series.

  39. List

    Texan artist Mark Lovejoy produces work that’s a bit of of a head scratcher. What at first looks like a complex digital render could also just be photographs of thickly-painted palettes. In fact Mark’s images are a hybrid of both; myriad individual photographs of paints, pigments waxes and resins, shot and reshot, manipulated and then retouched some more until the surface textures take a pleasing aesthetic form, but retain their ambiguous genesis.

  40. Fish

    We just can’t get enough of well-executed GIFs here at It’s Nice That at the moment, so we were rather chuffed when today’s grey morning was brightened up with these stunning moving images from photographer Chris O’Donovan.