Publication Archive

  1. Mouthfeel_it's_nice_that_list

    When you hear the words “queer culinary magazine” you might be inclined to envisage a kind of Good Housekeeping for gay men, some kind of conservative bible of new male domesticity. What you might not be expecting is an alternative publication where food and gay culture sit together against a post-punk backdrop, but that’s exactly what Mouthfeel is. A reaction against the all-pervading rustic minimalism championed by the likes of Kinfolk that has all but homogenised food media, Mouthfeel gives food writing a gay voice, combining chef profiles, recipes, essays and good looking men.

  2. Michaelcraig-martin-onbeinganartist-istnicethat-list

    In some circumstances, calling a book On Being An Artist would seem pretentious and pompous, but if anyone knows about being an artist, it’s Michael Craig-Martin. Over his extraordinary career he has studied with Chuck Close and Richard Serra, met the likes of Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, John Cage and Charles Saatchi, had work shown at Tate Modern, the Pompidou Centre and MoMA, and taught some of the YBAs’ leading lights including Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas.

  3. Antonio_ladrillo_lines_it's_nice_that_list

    Back with a colourful series of minimal, origami-like creations, Antonio Ladrillo’s Colors, Lines and Dots continues the same optimism and sense of play that has made the Barcelona-based illustrator is an It’s Nice That favourite. You may remember our enthusiasm for his exhibition of 40 small paintings on repurposed wood, Crash or his book Being a ghost is cool! The three new softcover books are designed with the same cuts, folds and palette but use different patterns, taking on multiple 2D and 3D combinations like folding cards. Part papercraft, part publication, like all of Antonio’s sunny portfolio, Colors, Lines and Dots is simple yet striking.

  4. List-hero-lottie-hanson-lowe-love-me-do-its-nice-that

    There’s nothing quite like the sweaty, sticky, lightheadedness of that first frenzied, totally-losing-your-shit adoration a band can induce. While I’ve never really been a boyband type, I’m not ashamed to say I still have the 1997 Blur calendar stashed away in a cupboard, and that near-lunacy that accompanies the love of a band is still very fresh in my mind. It’s also very fresh in the mind of young designer Lottie Hanson Lowe, who’s created a beautiful zine about boyband superfans called Love Me Do.

  5. James_irvine_it's_nice_that_list

    James Irvine is a name that carries as much weight in Italian design circles as it does in British. After graduating from the Royal College of Art in 1984, the Milan-based furniture and product designer worked under Ettore Sottsass at the Italian design studio Olivetti before striking out on his own and designing everything from Phaidon’s unrivalled stand at the Frankfurt Book Fair for several years, to city buses for Mercedes-Benz, and chairs for IKEA and Muji. Now, art publisher Phaidon has worked closely with his family and friends to release an intimate look at the life and work of the late design legend.

  6. List-anna-dunn-dot-magazine-its-nice-that

    For the past nine years, Anorak magazine has been making the lives of kids and their aesthetically aware parents that little bit brighter. The brainchild of Cathy Olmedillas, the mag proved to be a revelation in the world of kids’ publishing, which is all too often dominated by brash colours and here-one-minute-smashed-into-bits-the-next giveaways. Since its launch Anorak has spawned offshoots including teen mag Teepee, but its latest offering is Dot, aimed at the under fives.

  7. Polly-brown-itsnicethat-list

    Open Little Deaths, the sweet new publication by photographer Polly Brown (the very same who photographed office plants in the world’s biggest companies), and if you’re not at home with French euphemisms you might believe you’re looking at photographs of places where a person experienced their first kiss, say, or ate a really good BLT. You’re not, of course – a “little death,” as translated from the French “petit mort” is an orgasm, and Polly is interested in those of the self-induced variety.

  8. Recens-itsnicethat-list-2

    When I was 15 years old I was getting drunk on Bacardi Breezers by the beach huts and caking myself in Impulse body sprays to try to cover up the smell of smoke from a crafty fag on the way home from school. I definitely was not launching an independent magazine, formulated in response to the oppressive perfectionism of mainstream media. But that’s because I’m not Elise By Olsen.

  9. Abi-benitez-gayletter-covers-its-nice-that-list

    It’s not just the beautiful boys, pops of candy pink and considered, but effortless-seeming look and feel of Gayletter that’s made me fall slightly in love with it on the first flick through. I think it’s chimed so much in its sense of positivity – a feel of community and working together to celebrate what’s positive and beautiful in not only gay culture, but in society more widely. The second issue of the mag arrived in the post recently all the way from New York, and greeted with that sunny, fun cover image of a pretty young thing cradling a bunch of big yellow sunflowers, we couldn’t really resist it.

  10. Htmlflowers-virtualcandle-spaceface-itsnicethat-list

    We’ve been quietly stalking HTMLflowers (aka Grant Gronewold) these past few years since we found him through Simon Hanselmann’s Girl Mountain tumblr. The pair are housemates, living and working together in a most intense fashion – drawing, eating, sleeping and dabbling with chemicals together – but that’s something we’ve explored here if you want to find out more.

  11. Uniteditions-spin360-itsnicethat-list

    Tony Brook is clearly knackered. The 520-page monograph of his studio Spin produced by Unit Editions, the publishing imprint he co-runs with Adrian Shaughnessy, is just weeks away from publication and his pride is cut with obvious exhaustion.

  12. Mattia-balsamini-itsnicethat-list

    For a couple of years now I’ve been compiling a list of elite clubs I dream of being a part of, and one of those is the world of country music. As if to further ignite my jealousy last week Italian photographer Mattia Balsamini sent over a zine containing a series he shot at a three-day country fair in Pordenone, Italy, and it looks absolutely glorious.

  13. Esquire-itsnicethat-list

    “Many of us – most of us, probably – fear change, even (perhaps especially) of the new-hairstyle variety. Change is scary, upsetting.” This is how Esquire editor-in-chief Alex Bilmes sets up the magazine’s redesign in his editor’s letter and with a new masthead on a bright coloured bar, a new colour palette focused on deep reds and blues, new supplementary typefaces and some structural changes to the culture and style sections, it’s fair to say creative director Nick Millington has overseen more than a “new-hairstyle” change.

  14. Sleek-itsnicethat-list

    If you’ve rummaged through the art magazines in a well-stocked bookshop of late, you’ll likely have found yourself face to face with the glossy red cover of the new issue of Sleek magazine. A quarterly publication operating out of Berlin, Sleek takes contemporary art and recontextualises it as being just one element of visual culture as a whole, all of which is interesting, it argues. So instead of warding off would-be readers with inaccessible fine art speak and conceptual ideas, Sleek looks at photography, fashion and even topics like Greek mythology and health as being one and the same with art with a capital “A,” and covers the lot. Well, why wouldn’t it?

  15. Psychpress-itsmicethat-main

    It’s comforting to know that while we flap about pre-General Election and gas on about things like house prices and the economy, down in deepest Cornwall there is a group of people dedicating their lives to publishing tomes centred around the relatively niche topic of psychedelia. Psychedelic Press UK is an independent publisher that “deals with the science, history and literature of psychoactive substances, and altered states of consciousness.” Their books and regular journal are a platform for fiction and non-fiction outpourings that seek to explore the enormous but rarely spoken about world of psychedelic experiences and belief. We caught up with Robert Dickins from the press about how it works, the backlash they face and why they’re doing it in the first place.

  16. Acne-studios-peter-schlesinger-collectionitsnicethat-list

    The most fascinating collaborations grow organically out of obscure details discovered through a working relationship between two creatives. In this case, that detail is sculptor Peter Schlesinger’s love of silk pyjamas, a gem which was disclosed to Acne Studios’ creative director Jonny Johansson. The pair met working on collaborations between Peter and Acne Paper, and the decision to make a book about Peter’s work in tandem with a collection of Acne pyjamas based on his prints, and in colours inspired by his ceramic glazes, seems to have grown naturally out of this bond.

  17. Mattwilley-avaunt-itsnicethat-list

    Back in March I was on a panel discussing magazine publishing with Matt Willey. We spoke in some detail about the challenges of making magazines work; something Matt is perfectly positioned to pontificate on seeing as he’s worked at a whole host of titles and even started his own in Port (although he’s no longer involved). Now based in the States as part of Gail Bichler’s design team at The New York Times Magazine, he seemed to have found the ideal fit for his prodigious editorial talents, but a few weeks ago news reached us confirming that Matt was starting a new magazine with longtime collaborator (and Port co-founder) Dan Crowe, and the explorer Ben Saunders. Why throw himself into these choppy, challenging waters again?

  18. Ditto-gllts-itsnicethat-list

    In Iron Fist Magazine editor Louise Brown’s brilliantly written foreword to God Listens to Slayer, she compares heavy metal music to religion, and the journey from fandom to concert hall to a spiritual pilgrimage. “In the last British census, heavy metal defeated Scientology when 6,242 people claimed to follow it religiously,” Louise explains. “It was official: following Slayer to the ends of the earth was confirmed as a form of worship. But we who live and breathe heavy metal already knew that.”

  19. Lostmagazine-itsnicethat-list

    Modern urban living must be having a strange effect on society if the swelling number of independent travel magazines is anything to go by. The concrete confines of our respective metropoles are inspiring a wanderlust within us, sparking wave after wave of print publications with their sights set on adventure. If we’re being brutally honest there are only a few that bring anything new to the table so it’s exciting to discover a title that offers more than jet-setting anecdotes from the one percent.

  20. Offset-waysandmeans-itsnicethat-list

    Anyone who has ever been to a design conference will be familiar with the tote bag rummage, a just-arrived ritual that all too often ends in underwhelmed flyer reading. So it was with refreshing excitement that we happened upon Ways And Means in the bags at this year’s Offset festival in Dublin. The bespoke magazine – designed by Offset head honcho Bren Byrne – breathed new life into the design conference give-away with a variety of in-depth profiles of the speakers which provided genuinely interesting insight and context ahead of their talks.

  21. Atlasstudio-elephant22-itsnicethat-list

    In his beautifully-written editor’s letter for the new issue of Elephant magazine, Marc Valli laments the lack of soul in the New York art scene. The city remains, he contends, “ the richest art centre in the world,” but it no longer offers the same heady possibilities of the city’s creative apogee in the 1960s and 70s.

  22. Lencroyable-itsnicethat-main

    We’ve seen a lot of themed magazines recently. People having a whack at creating publications based around one topic or idea, a little like risky concept albums. Slightly less honed-in than, say, the magazine for redheads, dogs, or cats, this new glossy bi-annual from Paris is themed around adolescence. Created by designer and artist Clotilde Viannay and art directed by Raphaël Garnier, the magazine is centred around one big name – in this issue it is Juliette Greco – who is interviewed about her life, predominantly that sticky awkward bit around the teenage years, to see how it shaped her future.

  23. Mrc1-itsnicethat-main

    Last week redheads all over the world got really hacked off at the announcement of a bunch of new ethnically-diverse Emojis on the iPhone, angered that the flame-haired 2% of the world is still being underrepresented, nay disrespected. In the same week, MagCulture announced its faultless magazine of the week feature bearing a new publication entitled MC1R: A magazine for redheads.

  24. Karlanders-heavybirthday-itsnicethat-list

    I don’t know how much of it can be attributed to the wonders of Google translate, but the “About” paragraph for Karl Anders’ new issue of Der Zirkel, der macht is a hoot. “The worst party of the city follows naturally an equally weighty magazine,” it states. “Divided into the categories of ‘cake, card, candles,’ we penetrate horrible-beautiful and forgotten photo albums of the nineties.”

  25. List

    When we meet for coffee at 9am on a Wednesday morning Dan Stafford is buzzing. He speaks at speed but with accuracy, gulping down his coffee between momentary pauses and flicking his eyes from side to side like a shifty bird. He makes eye contact and breaks it in an instant, searching in the distance for his next thought. It seems he’s been awake for days; He’s definitely been awake for days – he launched his magazine only a day before.

  26. Nic-natives-int-list

    What happens when you take five very talented artists and makers, and send them all off together to a a stone barn in the Lake District to draw, make music, write poetry, take photographs and generally spend time exploring together? Beautiful things, that’s what, as Nicolas Burrows (who is one third of brilliant collective Nous Vous) soon found out.

  27. Jeroensmeets-thejaunt-int-list

    On the spine of The Jaunt book there’s a Latin phrase printed in white capital letters – “qua patent orbis,” which translates as “as far as the world extends.” It’s a fitting motto for this interesting project, which began life as a blog back in 2013. The idea is simple enough, curator Jeroen Smeets sends an artist (Mike Perry, Jordy van den Nieuwendijk, David Shillinglaw) off to an interesting city (Istanbul, Riga, Porto, Los Angeles) in the hope that the trip will “take the artist outside of their comfort zone and let them experience completely new surroundings.”

  28. Johnny-ryan-angry-youth-7

    In 2008 the fourteenth and final issue of Johnny Ryan’s Angry Youth Comix was published and all of a sudden some of the world’s greatest fart jokes, cock drawings, and narratives set inside vaginas disappeared from publication. The world got a little less crude that day. Realising that people crave this kind of horrible filth, Fantagraphics and Johnny have compiled all 14 stinking, degrading, borderline unpublishable issues into one great big compendium of poop and smut. What more can I say? If you’ve got the brain of a 12-year-old boy, if you love needless swearing, repellant characters, bad puns and diarrhea then Angry Youth Comix may be the last book you’ll ever need to buy.

  29. Emilyoberman-snl-int-hero

    One of the undoubted highlights of this year’s Design Indaba conference in Cape Town was hearing Pentagram partner Emily Oberman detail her long-running work on Saturday Night Live. Emily has worked with the programme for 20 years, creating three separate versions of its identity, various title sequences and even spoof adverts to run in the breaks (like this). Now Emily has teamed up with writer Alison Castle to produce Saturday Night Live: The Book, a 500-page paean to the show which coincides with its 40th anniversary this autumn.

  30. Snask-printing-friends-int-list

    “Oh for Christ’s sake how many more independent food magazines could there possibly be?” someone is probably asking right now as they look at this article – and to be fair to them, they’d have a point. But fret not, we aren’t here to herald the arrival of another culinary periodical geared towards the aesthetically-minded foodie. This is in fact Issue 8 of the litho-lover’s fanbook, Printing Friends and the food theme is just a one-off.

  31. Craigoldham-int-main

    Last week a book arrived in our office via the hands of It’s Nice That director Alex Bec. He told us all it was created by Craig Oldham, who he had just seen give a brilliant talk about the creation of the publication. It’s called In Loving Memory of Work, and it is a spectacularly well-designed, excitingly and refreshingly well-informed book documenting the UK miners’ strike between 1984 and 1985. For something so long, violent and shocking that happened in recent history, I’ve sometimes felt that the miners’ strike hasn’t really been talked about as much as it should have been. But I can see why: it’s hard to get to grips with something that horrible happening to so many people and so nearby.

  32. Calm-and-collected-sad-int-list

    About a month ago we stepped off a gloomy grey street in east London and into the rays of an indoor sunshine. At Protein Space in east London a giant orange light was recreating the warmth that emanates from the sun, a steelpan ensemble in the corner was spewing out tropical melodies, and a whole wall plastered in fluorescent illustration and artworks was attracting everybody within a five metre radius, like moths to a printerly flame. The occasion was S.A.D, a weekend exhibition put on by the lads behind Studio Calm & Collected to assuage the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, brought on by the relentless British winter.

  33. Main1

    As numerous Instagram posts will testify, people just love to look at buildings getting knocked down. There’s something so captivating about that huge, brutal, utter destruction and the debris it brings. Perhaps it reminds us of the fleeting transience of life itself. Perhaps we just love mess, cranes and diggers. Either way, this surely universal fascination with smashing shit up means that we’re very, very into a new project from Alina Schmuch, a photographer who has put together the book Script of Demolition.

  34. Gmnieves-main-int

    The only thing more joyous and fascinating than peering at Geoff McFetridge’s paintings is seeing the sketches that were made by his hand in the lead-up to their creation. We’ve gushed before about Geoff a lot, particularly about the fact that he more often than not works from his mind rather than from life. His sketchbooks are full of diagrams and viewpoints invented by his brain and scribbled down before evolving into beautiful, serene paintings, and have just been collected into a new publication from my very own favourite publishers, Nieves.

  35. Chris-clarke-the-guardian-thefashion_redesign_coverstory1-int-list-2

    Described as “bold, bright and boisterous,” The Guardian’s redesign of its biannual magazine The Fashion manages to navigate that tricky aesthetic of merging playful with high-end. The magazine, which launched in 2013, was redesigned by The Guardian deputy creative director Chris Clarke, who aimed to align the supplement more with the paper’s other products. As such, there’s a new display font, a refined icon and a new typographic logo-mark which also acts as a page divider and guides the eye round the content in a simple, almost Bauhaus-esque way.

  36. Krass-mag-10-int

    KRASS is a nod to the function of a magazine as something to be taken home, read in bed, cut up, stuck up, passed around,” says Sanja Grozdanic, co-founder of the new publication. “We were motivated by the lofty ideals one finds studying Journalism or Literature, that are quickly extinguished in the real world. The medicine for that is to create your own world – one that happens to grant you access to a never-ending supply of brilliant minds.”

  37. Brick_01_cover_wizkhalifa-int-list

    There’s no question that BRICK has been the attraction of choice in the It’s Nice That studio this week. Its fluorescent green logotype and Wiz Khalifa’s fixing gaze on the cover combine to act like metal to magpies, and within seconds of picking it up you’ve been drawn in. It might be to a feature in which ex Death Row Records employee Nina Bhadreshwar reflects on her friendship with Tupac, or one where Cam’ron and T.I. discuss staying relevant after 15 years in the game, or editor-in-chief Grant Brydon gets inside the brain of Joey Bada$$. Either way, there’s no putting it down.

  38. Dbg-book-int-list

    We’re huge fans of David Brandon Geeting at It’s Nice That, so news that his work has been immortalised in the form of a gloriously colourful new publication by Pau Wau books was music to our tired ears. Infinite Power is full of his characteristic still lifes, removing everyday objects from common use to make them appear utterly isolated and a bit strange. Copper piping topped with an egg? Check. A fluffy rug paired with a garlic clove? It’s in there. A never-ending hug of extension leads? He’s got that too. David, you complete us.

  39. Nikhartley-everyst-3-int

    Nik Hartley’s Every Street records three days worth of haircut highlights at Stylz barber shop in North-East Lancashire. Alongside the strong cuts are shots of the red-brick terraces that line the streets, bunting and electricity pylons. There’s a nice sense of pride to the portraits, both of a good haircut and more pertinently, the social hub of a hometown.

  40. Ewen-spencer-int-list-new

    To describe Ewen Spencer as anything less than a pillar of British counterculture would be to do him an extreme disservice. Having served stints at iconic magazines The Face and Sleazenation in the 1990s he has since watched the rise and fall of UK garage, documented the grittiest corners of grime, shot teenagers partying in Napoli and Ayia Napa and caught the best of European styling which has made its way over to Miami. He actually told us about some of it at our Here conference last year, and if you’re interested you can watch the full talk here.