Publication Archive

  1. Limparfaite-itsnicethat-list-2

    I know what you’re thinking – “oh, jolly good – another indie mag repurposing erotica” – but happily, Paris-based magazine L’imparfaite does much more than most sexy mags. Founded in 2009 by graduates from the prestigious Sciences Po Paris institute of political studies, the publication was conceived as a kind of revolution. “The journal drew much attention by offering critical inquiry into gender and sexuality and by literally undressing the future elite of French politics,” the editors explain. “Since then, the journal has extended its reach beyond the academy and welcomed contributions by writers and photographers from around the world.”

  2. Nytbr-int-art-issue

    Over the weekend The New York Times Book Review unveiled its first ever art issue. Featuring a hefty line-up of illustrated books, art-themed fiction, artist biographies, commentary, photography books and monographs reviewed by its esteemed critics and editors, and a cover created by Sarah Illenberger, the art issue is a surprising first in the weekly supplement’s 119-year run.

  3. Nigel-edginton-vigus-fairground-its-nice-that-list

    The bright lights, the sickly scent of candy floss, the relentlessly getting shafted trying to win a child-size plush Pink Panther on the coconut shy…there’s something truly magical, rather strange and occasionally sinister about the fairground. While its typography is often mimicked, few have recognised the brilliance of the surreal artworks that grace its rides, stalls and signs. From strange approximations of Will Smith’s face to depictions of Pinhead from Hellraiser to some genuinely beautiful psychedelic artworks, it’s a garish and beguiling world, and one that’s long fascinated creative director Nigel Edginton-Vigus, who’s created a new book Waltzer to show it all off.

  4. Intern-mag-itsnicethat-list

    Two years ago the much heralded first issue of Intern magazine landed on our desks, having been started as the product of founder Alec Dudson’s own frustration with the placement system, and powered by that of his team. It surprised us all with its bold design, excellently curated features and the sheer quality of its editorial content, creating a platform from which would-be interns can speak, and to be paid for it too.

  5. Its-nice-that-list-nips-headmaster_no7_silano2_web

    A large, veiny golden phallus and a very cheeky title made Headmaster a magazine sure to get our attention. And boys, boys, boys it did; mixing art, illustration, innovative copy and a smart curatorial eye, the mag is more than a smutty pun. It’s now in its seventh issue, so we had a chat with co-founder Matthew Lawrence about the print publication billed as “the biannual print magazine for the sophisticated man-lover”.

  6. Mannnu_itsnicethat_list

    Mannnu AKA Manu Rodriguez’s website is simple and considered with only a handful of projects included, but it’s ample opportunity to get a sense of how this art director and designer works. Based in Barcelona, the two projects created in collaboration with Spanish photographer Jose Perroche caught our eye.

  7. List-eric-hu-talk-magazine-its-nice-that-

    We’re longtime, long-distance admirers of the work of Eric Hu, so the news that he’s recently launched a new magazine, Talk, is pretty damn exciting. And from what we’ve seen of the spreads, young Eric’s not disappointed us. The mag is the product of a collaboration with art director and writer Harry Gassel, former art director at The Fader, and is described as “a style-driven magazine on design focused on emerging culture.” And style-driven it damn well is: we’re digging the cover typeface, which seems to be formed of gloomy balloons, while the spreads show some innovative approaches to layout and image size. The first issue features the likes of David Brandon Geeting, Maxime Harvey, Simon Whybray and Raf Rennie, and we’re keen to see how Talk’s dialogue continues in future issues.

  8. Canyon-itsnicethat-list

    What do you get when you send two mates, one a photographer with camera in hand, and the other a journalist with an eye for a weird story, to LA to hang out for a week? In the case of Dan Wilton and Josh Jones, the answer is a book. More specifically, a book about the spectacularly weird collection of people you can find at the top of Runyon Canyon.

  9. Gourmand_covers_it's_nice_that_list

    Yesterday everyone’s favourite food and culture journal unveiled twin covers for its latest issue. In a surreal collaboration between photographer Jenny van Sommers and set designer Rachel Thomas, the ketchup-themed covers (and back covers) for issue six of The Gourmand are taken from a feature paying homage to the humble but ever versatile condiment. “I would love to tell you that it was a calculated strategy but in fact it was a bit more organic,” said co-founder and creative director David Lane of the publication’s first ever dual covers. They simply couldn’t decide between the oversized chip smothered in PVC ketchup and the floating hamburger sandwiched between two cloches, and luckily “they are ideally suited for a split cover.”

  10. Ni-hao-kiti-itsnicethat-list

    Fine, so she’s not a cat, she’s a girl called Kitty White – but even so, Hello Kitty is my favourite of all the brands that have survived globalisation. The sweet anthropomorphic kitten was first designed by Yuko Shimizu in 1974, produced by Japanese company Sanrio, and since her inception she has risen to the status of a global megastar. So much so that photographer Antonia Henschel saw fit to document her presence across Asia – Shanghai, Taipei, Tokyo, Seoul are all included – and turn the series into a book. Published as part of Frankfurt-based press Trademark Publishing’s Picnic series, the sweet collection documents Kitty’s feline presence in the form of balloons, cakes, flowers with whiskers, fancy dress costumes, teddy bears and signage, and it’s a loving and chaotic ode to her enduring presence. Long may she reign.

  11. Ines-cox-kwintessens-its-nice-that-list

    We’ve long been a fan of the work of Antwerp-based graphic designer Ines Cox, who founded her own eponymous practice back in March. The latest project to emerge from her considered stable of great designs is for Kwintessens, a quarterly design and fashion magazine published by Design Flanders in cooperation with Flanders Fashion Institute. Since its launch in 1992, each issue of the magazine has been designed by a different creative, and Ines’ look for the latest issue, dedicated to the theme “from birth to death,” uses a grave-like grey cover and stark black lettering. For all its dark exterior, though, the pages show a deft eye for the power of negative space, letting colourful text and beautiful imagery speak through a careful grid system. From the typeface to the colourways to the commissioning, Kwintessens is a beautifully designed, inspirational piece of print.

  12. Offways-marius-burgmann-and-mike-magduschewski-its-nice-that-list

    Marius Burgmann and Mike Magduschewski not only sound like a buddy movie duo, but are also rather industrious and talented designers. The pair recently got in touch with news of their great new venture Offways, a brilliantly-designed biannual magazine that they not only design, but edit and publish, too. Based in Dortmund, Germany, the magazine looks to champion the work of creative types who make something because they love it, and to put it simply, they couldn’t not create it. It uses Grillitype’s GT Sectra and GT Cinetype, with a screen-printed cover and a hand-made illustration slotted into each copy.

  13. Yard-press-22-new-york-polaroids-its-nice-that-list

    If Polaroid pictures, New York City, Andy Warhol and attractive naked girls don’t make for a heady aesthetic mix, we don’t know what does. Brace yourselves then for this lovely book, New York Polaroids 1976–1989, showcasing images by Swiss photographer and director Edo Bertoglio. While it’s all well and good that the images narrate his time hanging out with the likes of Madonna, Debbie Harry, Grace Jones and the aforementioned Mr Warhol, they also manage to capture time and place in the way only Polaroids and true party people can. Edo arrived in New York with Maripol, his artist, filmmaker and stylist wife, and he explains in the book the exact moment he realised he was utterly in love with the city. “Everything started between 5th and 34th Street, on a clear and cold afternoon… All of a sudden we hugged, with tears in our eyes, terrified by the metropolis, by our own loneliness and the lack of stable work,” he says.

  14. Hexus-itsnicethat-list

    Experimental literature publications arguably have a pretty raw deal of it when it comes to first impressions. Too often they’re immediately written off as a slew of black text crammed unthinkingly into a zine format, when in fact the very genre lends itself to something a little more thoughtful. Hexus journal takes the latter form. The first issue, subtitled The New Black, was designed by Christopher Gray, who has set out a selection of experimental texts – short stories, poems and the like – in a pared-back but concise format, with bold headers interspersed with tailor-made imagery to set the mood, with chunky black borders to differentiate between sections. The journal is almost Tristram Shandy-esque in its employment of solid black pages, broken paragraphs and the occasional music stave, resulting in a publication which demands not only to be picked up, but also to be read. Cover to cover. Potentially more than once.

  15. Linder-sterling-its-nice-that-list

    I can honestly say that Linder Sterling is one of the reasons I became interested in graphic design. As a teenager who wanted to look cool and interesting, I picked up The Buzzcocks’ Orgasm Addict record: not necessarily because they appeared on all the punk anthology CDs I was borrowing from a small, fusty library near Guildford, but because of Linder’s image on the Malcolm Garrett-designed cover. There’s something about that image – a woman with an iron for a head from an Argos catalogue, on the body of a porn model – that really blew my mind. It still does. While many have imitated her style, Linder’s still resonates as the most caustic and evocative, placing flowers over porn-ready genitals and catalogue cutouts where you’d least expect them.

  16. Defective_carrots_it's_nice_that_list

    People often talk about the crippling beauty standards of the fashion or film industries but apparently our food undergoes the same scrutiny. Our produce aisles, it turns out, are far more curated than you may think. You might recall Marcel’s Inglorious Fruits and Vegetables campaign that won the Design Museum’s graphics category for Design of the Year last month (it was also championed in our 2014 It’s Nice That Annual and picked up a D&AD Yellow Pencil). In a similar vein, Tim Smyth’s bright orange book Defective Carrots is an alternative encyclopaedia of farmers’ market misfits and looks at 56 ugly, unwanted carrots that didn’t make the food industry cut. Some are grotesque, some are strangely endearing, and some are outright phallic but many are only vaguely irregular and beg the question: are we just too picky?

  17. Charlotte_heal_itsnicethat_list

    Any fans of MasterChef series seven will remember winner Tim Anderson, the eccentric American whose final plates of food were, in his words, “a global extravaganza.” Following the dream of amateur cook to big-time chef, Tim’s got a successful cookbook out and it’s been designed by Charlotte Heal, one of our Here 2015 speakers.

  18. Lucy-williams-itsnicethat--list

    The last time we wrote about papercutting extraordinaire Lucy Williams’ work, it was to bemoan the fact that we hadn’t already come across her work – elaborate and intricate papercut artworks which redefine the limits of the medium. This time around that issue has been rectified, as publishing house Roads has just released a monograph of her work – and it’s a beauty of an artist’s book – so here we are, singing her praises from the rooftops once again.

  19. List-devendra-banhart-adam-tullie-book-its-nice-that-

    If two heads are better than one, then surely the combination of three brilliant creatives is betterer. This new book designed by Adam Sajkowski is a perfect example, setting off some rather brilliant content in the shape of work by Adam Tullie and Devendra Banhart. The book, Unburdened by Meaning, documents work created by the pair over the space of one week at Devendra’s drawing studio in New York (see his bloody gorgeous studio here). The book features texts by Ross Simonini and Chris Fallon.

  20. Pylot-itsnicethat-list

    I’m all for a glossy mag that’s chock-a-block with larger-than-life studio shots of models in surreal situations (I’m looking at you, Annie Leibovitz), but there’s a raw beauty to analogue photographs that haven’t been retouched, and this is what PYLOT magazine is all about.

  21. Law-itsnicethat-list

    Contrary to popular belief held by traipsing tourists clutching camera phones and suits marching towards their City jobs, Britain’s identity encompasses a spirit far greater than anything red phone booths, Beefeaters, or the £20 pound note could ever encapsulate. It’s in suburban streets, overlooked gestures, quietly uttered slang and your older sister’s shoe cupboard. Or, as the magazine explains it, “for how long will 90s Umbro diamonds and Vauxhall Novas still align the streets, from bottom drawers and charity shops, through used car dealers with luminous stickers along pavements stuck in polka dots?"

  22. I-d-35th-anniversary-itsnicethat-list

    Never one to do anything by halves, i-D magazine is feting its 35th birthday with a grand total of 18 covers, featuring the most recognisable of supermodels alongside some rising stars of fashion, music, art and film. What’s more, all 18 were shot by the inimitable Alasdair McLellan, who took every image in the issue.

  23. Sea-aiap-fedrigoni-madeinitaly-itsnicethat-list

    Europe has a fine graphic design tradition but certain countries – Switzerland, The Netherlands, and the UK – tend to predominate when it comes to coverage. And so we’re always keen to hear about initiatives that celebrate lesser known design scenes, such as SEA and Fedrigoni’s upcoming exploration of Italy’s graphics heritage. Made In Italy showcases post-war Italian graphic design by way of a show in east London and a series of monographs focussing on some of the most interesting practitioners – Ilio Negri, Heinz Waibl, Franco Grignani and Giancarlo Iliprandi. With amazing access to the Aiap archives in Milan, SEA has also put together a book for the show with the explicit aim of putting this “untapped” subject firmly in the spotlight.

  24. Mouthfeel_it's_nice_that_list

    When you hear the words “queer culinary magazine” you might be inclined to envisage a kind of Good Housekeeping for gay men, some kind of conservative bible of new male domesticity. What you might not be expecting is an alternative publication where food and gay culture sit together against a post-punk backdrop, but that’s exactly what Mouthfeel is. A reaction against the all-pervading rustic minimalism championed by the likes of Kinfolk that has all but homogenised food media, Mouthfeel gives food writing a gay voice, combining chef profiles, recipes, essays and good looking men.

  25. Michaelcraig-martin-onbeinganartist-istnicethat-list

    In some circumstances, calling a book On Being An Artist would seem pretentious and pompous, but if anyone knows about being an artist, it’s Michael Craig-Martin. Over his extraordinary career he has studied with Chuck Close and Richard Serra, met the likes of Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, John Cage and Charles Saatchi, had work shown at Tate Modern, the Pompidou Centre and MoMA, and taught some of the YBAs’ leading lights including Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas.

  26. Antonio_ladrillo_lines_it's_nice_that_list

    Back with a colourful series of minimal, origami-like creations, Antonio Ladrillo’s Colors, Lines and Dots continues the same optimism and sense of play that has made the Barcelona-based illustrator is an It’s Nice That favourite. You may remember our enthusiasm for his exhibition of 40 small paintings on repurposed wood, Crash or his book Being a ghost is cool! The three new softcover books are designed with the same cuts, folds and palette but use different patterns, taking on multiple 2D and 3D combinations like folding cards. Part papercraft, part publication, like all of Antonio’s sunny portfolio, Colors, Lines and Dots is simple yet striking.

  27. List-hero-lottie-hanson-lowe-love-me-do-its-nice-that

    There’s nothing quite like the sweaty, sticky, lightheadedness of that first frenzied, totally-losing-your-shit adoration a band can induce. While I’ve never really been a boyband type, I’m not ashamed to say I still have the 1997 Blur calendar stashed away in a cupboard, and that near-lunacy that accompanies the love of a band is still very fresh in my mind. It’s also very fresh in the mind of young designer Lottie Hanson Lowe, who’s created a beautiful zine about boyband superfans called Love Me Do.

  28. James_irvine_it's_nice_that_list

    James Irvine is a name that carries as much weight in Italian design circles as it does in British. After graduating from the Royal College of Art in 1984, the Milan-based furniture and product designer worked under Ettore Sottsass at the Italian design studio Olivetti before striking out on his own and designing everything from Phaidon’s unrivalled stand at the Frankfurt Book Fair for several years, to city buses for Mercedes-Benz, and chairs for IKEA and Muji. Now, art publisher Phaidon has worked closely with his family and friends to release an intimate look at the life and work of the late design legend.

  29. List-anna-dunn-dot-magazine-its-nice-that

    For the past nine years, Anorak magazine has been making the lives of kids and their aesthetically aware parents that little bit brighter. The brainchild of Cathy Olmedillas, the mag proved to be a revelation in the world of kids’ publishing, which is all too often dominated by brash colours and here-one-minute-smashed-into-bits-the-next giveaways. Since its launch Anorak has spawned offshoots including teen mag Teepee, but its latest offering is Dot, aimed at the under fives.

  30. Polly-brown-itsnicethat-list

    Open Little Deaths, the sweet new publication by photographer Polly Brown (the very same who photographed office plants in the world’s biggest companies), and if you’re not at home with French euphemisms you might believe you’re looking at photographs of places where a person experienced their first kiss, say, or ate a really good BLT. You’re not, of course – a “little death,” as translated from the French “petit mort” is an orgasm, and Polly is interested in those of the self-induced variety.

  31. Recens-itsnicethat-list-2

    When I was 15 years old I was getting drunk on Bacardi Breezers by the beach huts and caking myself in Impulse body sprays to try to cover up the smell of smoke from a crafty fag on the way home from school. I definitely was not launching an independent magazine, formulated in response to the oppressive perfectionism of mainstream media. But that’s because I’m not Elise By Olsen.

  32. Abi-benitez-gayletter-covers-its-nice-that-list

    It’s not just the beautiful boys, pops of candy pink and considered, but effortless-seeming look and feel of Gayletter that’s made me fall slightly in love with it on the first flick through. I think it’s chimed so much in its sense of positivity – a feel of community and working together to celebrate what’s positive and beautiful in not only gay culture, but in society more widely. The second issue of the mag arrived in the post recently all the way from New York, and greeted with that sunny, fun cover image of a pretty young thing cradling a bunch of big yellow sunflowers, we couldn’t really resist it.

  33. Htmlflowers-virtualcandle-spaceface-itsnicethat-list

    We’ve been quietly stalking HTMLflowers (aka Grant Gronewold) these past few years since we found him through Simon Hanselmann’s Girl Mountain tumblr. The pair are housemates, living and working together in a most intense fashion – drawing, eating, sleeping and dabbling with chemicals together – but that’s something we’ve explored here if you want to find out more.

  34. Uniteditions-spin360-itsnicethat-list

    Tony Brook is clearly knackered. The 520-page monograph of his studio Spin produced by Unit Editions, the publishing imprint he co-runs with Adrian Shaughnessy, is just weeks away from publication and his pride is cut with obvious exhaustion.

  35. Mattia-balsamini-itsnicethat-list

    For a couple of years now I’ve been compiling a list of elite clubs I dream of being a part of, and one of those is the world of country music. As if to further ignite my jealousy last week Italian photographer Mattia Balsamini sent over a zine containing a series he shot at a three-day country fair in Pordenone, Italy, and it looks absolutely glorious.

  36. Esquire-itsnicethat-list

    “Many of us – most of us, probably – fear change, even (perhaps especially) of the new-hairstyle variety. Change is scary, upsetting.” This is how Esquire editor-in-chief Alex Bilmes sets up the magazine’s redesign in his editor’s letter and with a new masthead on a bright coloured bar, a new colour palette focused on deep reds and blues, new supplementary typefaces and some structural changes to the culture and style sections, it’s fair to say creative director Nick Millington has overseen more than a “new-hairstyle” change.

  37. Sleek-itsnicethat-list

    If you’ve rummaged through the art magazines in a well-stocked bookshop of late, you’ll likely have found yourself face to face with the glossy red cover of the new issue of Sleek magazine. A quarterly publication operating out of Berlin, Sleek takes contemporary art and recontextualises it as being just one element of visual culture as a whole, all of which is interesting, it argues. So instead of warding off would-be readers with inaccessible fine art speak and conceptual ideas, Sleek looks at photography, fashion and even topics like Greek mythology and health as being one and the same with art with a capital “A,” and covers the lot. Well, why wouldn’t it?

  38. Psychpress-itsmicethat-main

    It’s comforting to know that while we flap about pre-General Election and gas on about things like house prices and the economy, down in deepest Cornwall there is a group of people dedicating their lives to publishing tomes centred around the relatively niche topic of psychedelia. Psychedelic Press UK is an independent publisher that “deals with the science, history and literature of psychoactive substances, and altered states of consciousness.” Their books and regular journal are a platform for fiction and non-fiction outpourings that seek to explore the enormous but rarely spoken about world of psychedelic experiences and belief. We caught up with Robert Dickins from the press about how it works, the backlash they face and why they’re doing it in the first place.

  39. Acne-studios-peter-schlesinger-collectionitsnicethat-list

    The most fascinating collaborations grow organically out of obscure details discovered through a working relationship between two creatives. In this case, that detail is sculptor Peter Schlesinger’s love of silk pyjamas, a gem which was disclosed to Acne Studios’ creative director Jonny Johansson. The pair met working on collaborations between Peter and Acne Paper, and the decision to make a book about Peter’s work in tandem with a collection of Acne pyjamas based on his prints, and in colours inspired by his ceramic glazes, seems to have grown naturally out of this bond.

  40. Mattwilley-avaunt-itsnicethat-list

    Back in March I was on a panel discussing magazine publishing with Matt Willey. We spoke in some detail about the challenges of making magazines work; something Matt is perfectly positioned to pontificate on seeing as he’s worked at a whole host of titles and even started his own in Port (although he’s no longer involved). Now based in the States as part of Gail Bichler’s design team at The New York Times Magazine, he seemed to have found the ideal fit for his prodigious editorial talents, but a few weeks ago news reached us confirming that Matt was starting a new magazine with longtime collaborator (and Port co-founder) Dan Crowe, and the explorer Ben Saunders. Why throw himself into these choppy, challenging waters again?