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Work / Graphic Design

Annina Schepping’s analogue-first approach to graphic design

German graphic designer Annina Schepping’s work is defined by its versatility. Not having a specific style or fixed process, Annina instead allows herself time to explore a topic and then generate ideas accordingly. Originally from Würzburg, she moved to Constance in southern Germany in 2012 where she is currently studying communication design and working on her thesis alongside Constanze Maier.

“I wish I had some romantic story to tell,” says Annina when asked about how she ended up studying graphic design. She had originally wanted to train as a lawyer, but soon realised she was not destined for a life of memorising stacks of books. Instead, she was more interested in designing them and it was this that sparked her fascination with printed matter and editorial design, something that is reflected across her practice today.

In terms of process, her projects are the result of myriad analogue techniques. “I cut things out, reorder them and compose them completely differently than I would have done digitally. This way, I’m able to generate a much higher amount of results in a very short time,” she explains, adding that, “for me, the most important thing is to make the projects look as much fun as I had making them.”

This approach is definitely reflected in Annina’s output. For example, in her project Katazin, which formed the visual identity for the graduation ceremony and exhibition of the communication design course at HTWG Konstanz. It features a series of colourful and abstract cut out shapes which are collaged alongside more linear, tonal shapes and geometric typefaces to create an identity which is both visually appealing and sophisticated.

In a collaboration with Alica Pfister, Annina spent a semester documenting the work that she was making in a publication titled Lab Book. The journal focuses on the “realisation and impact of self-produced methods of composition and tools.” In chronological order, the book describes each method and tool and the ways in which the pair utilised them in their work. While making Lab Book, Annina and Alica were screen printing nearly every week and barely used a computer, a rare method of practice on contemporary design courses.

By approaching projects in an analogue-first manner, Annina appears to be carving out a working process that leads to exciting and lively designs. By stepping away from the screen, she is able to interact with the elements of her work in a very different way and so produce unexpected results. Due to be finishing her studies in March 2018, Annina is definitely one to keep an eye on.

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Annina Schepping, Caroline Weigele and Viktoria Jung

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Annina Schepping, Caroline Weigele and Viktoria Jung

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Annina Schepping and Alica Pfister

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Annina Schepping and Alica Pfister

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Annina Schepping and Alica Pfister

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Annina Schepping

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Annina Schepping

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Annina Schepping

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Annina Schepping, Jean Böhm and Alica Pfister

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Annina Schepping, Jean Böhm and Alica Pfister