Publication

Analogue

Posted by Will Hudson,

This week’s guest post is Julie form the fantastic Analogue bookshop and gallery in Edinburgh. Analogue is a an art and design book shop that Julie and Russell opened 2001 and expanded 2 years ago to include a gallery space. They publish a series of zines called Running Amok and have recently brought out their first book, ‘Sheds’ by Nigel Peake.

‘Nigel first walked into our shop about 6 years ago with a bunch of drawings under his arm and we have had the pleasure on working with him on many projects since. Sheds’ contains 32 pages of recent work, inspired by a fascination with primitive structures. Nigel’s style is characterised by amazing detail and beautifully muted colours. We think it’s a beautiful book and hope you do too.’

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Posted by Will Hudson

Will founded It’s Nice That in 2007 and is now director of the company. Once one of the main contributors to the site he has stepped back from writing as the business has expanded. He is a regular guest on the Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Publication View Archive

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