1. Annie-atkins-grand-budapest-hotel-int-.7

    Gather round, quiet at the back. Are you chewing? We are thrilled to announce the latest addition to our Here 2015 line-up is…Annie Atkins! When Wes Anderson set about creating the extraordinarily detailed world of The Grand Budapest Hotel, he called on Annie, who has worked on TV dramas and feature films from The Tudors to Steven Spielberg’s upcoming Cold War thriller.

  2. Fantastic-man-list

    Fantastic Man magazine has been redesigned, as shown in its teaser image of its tenth anniversary issue. The magazine’s new issue cover star JW Anderson has shown the new cover on Instagram, which reveals a new design seeing the masthead run vertically and horizontally, instead of its previous preluder horizontal configuration. The cover image also runs to both sides, moving away from its previous white-edged format. We’re excited to see what changes might have been made to the inside of the mag…

  3. Dwp-bikestock-int-list

    This morning I had a puncture that I couldn’t fix and had to get the train to work, so it feels timely to be writing about Bikestock, a vending machine of cycling essentials that can be found all over New York and Boston. The concept is a simple one; inner tubes, spanners, tyre levers tyres and any number of other little bits and pieces that make your wheels turn smoothly are boshed into a vending machine so you can grab them on the go and, more importantly, at any time of day!

  4. List

    Joost Bos is a recent graduate from the Academie Minerva Groningen in The Netherlands where he’s spent three years studying for his bachelor’s degree. Like many of his Dutch counterparts he’s a dab hand with typography both traditional and experimental and has a plethora of printed pieces in his portfolio. This one, Sequence 1, is an exhibition catalogue for a show of artist books at Joost’s alma mater, which perfectly demonstrates his design sensibilities. Immaculately set type is interspersed with hand-drawn elements and bright colours bring intrigue to an otherwise monochrome publication. Like what you’re seeing? He’s available for freelance work right now!

  5. Sam-coldy-penguin-int-list

    Is it just me or is Penguin killing it at the moment? The publishing house only recently celebrated its 80th birthday by launching a range of its classic titles for 80p each, accompanied by a slick website and a poster campaign which has reached even the furthest corners of London’s transport system. And right now, they’re in the midst of a new campaign called On the Page which celebrates women authors and characters in literary masterpieces.

  6. Animade-propz-int-list

    “Ball sack!” reads the intro to this great new video for Animade, though it’s so gorgeous it didn’t even need something that puerile to lure us in. The film showcases the results of the studio’s Propz project, which sees it create an animation based around a prop suggested by the public. As such, the topics range from the pedestrian (fridges, shoelaces) to the surreal and phallic (wizard wand) and the rude – our aforementioned Ball Sack. All ten of the Propz pieces in one animation makes for a superb piece of work; charming, baffling, hilarious and utterly compelling. Our heart goes out to the sticky-taped cats at the end. We’re sure they’ll be just fine…

  7. Emptyset-chorde-festival-in-rome-into-hero

    It seems inaccurate and incongruous to describe Emptyset as a music act, or an AV project. It feels far more like a constantly shifting art project, with each live performance different in sound and visuals to the last. Emptyset is formed of two RCA graduates, Paul Purgas and James Ginzberg, with the visual side of thing also taken care of by Clayton Welham, a graphic designer at Why Not Associates.

  8. Hiro-murai-int-list

    If his music videos for the likes of Flying Lotus, St Vincent and Childish Gambino hadn’t already marked him out as one to keep an eye on, Hiro Murai’s latest directorial offering, the music video for Earl Sweatshirt’s new single Grief, should do it. Filmed on a thermal camera and played out in black and white, it’s in the same league as Never Catch Me which stunned us with its simple but incredibly original storyline. In this instance Hiro has taken the level of restraint one step further with a slowed down, monochrome approach – it’s brave, effective and perfectly matched to the pace of the emotive song. Somebody pin him down for a short film, sharpish.

  9. List

    If a theatrical tradition can last for over four centuries you can assume it’s pretty damn entertaining, and Japan’s Kabuki culture has done just that. It’s one of the country’s traditional performing arts, combining music, dance, elaborate costumes and striking face paint to riotous effect, with extremely dramatic results.

  10. Unnamed-1

    Sometimes on the podcast we have enlightening discussions about pertinent art and design issues, and sometimes we make silly puns. Well this week dear listener we tick both of those boxes with some terrific chat about magazines, Designs of The Year and ELCAF but we also take a few minutes for canine-based tomfoolery. Take that expectations!

  11. Karansingh-mop-int-list

    The glorious coming together of pattern, shape and colour makes for a joyous experience and that’s why print designers are held in such high regard. Last week we commissioned Animade to turn three eye-poppingly good Pucci x Orlebar Brown patterns into trippy GIFs, this week we’re turning our attention to profiling creatives we believe are among the best around when it comes to working in this area. We are proud to present these #mastersofprint.

  12. Metronomy-db-int

    Since 1999 Metronomy have been releasing singles you can’t get out of your head for weeks, accompanied by fantastic album artwork by the likes of Leslie David, and incredible music videos that were like an oasis of sparkling water in a barren wasteland of indistinguishable pop and R&B videos. It’s only when you see them all together you understand just how fun, fearless and clever the band are. Not just for acting in the videos, but for enlisting the help of some of the most talented up-and-coming filmmakers working today. Here’s Joseph Mount, the frontman of the band, on the rather haphazard creation of these videos, and what it was like to work with greats such as David Wilson, Michel Gondry and Daniel Brereton.

  13. Jg-street-demon-int-list

    Got the mid-week hump-day gloom, friend? Allow me to do away with it for you with a bumper-pack of animated GIFs by the talented hand of illustrator and animator Julian Glander. He once came up with a clever app which transformed colour data into sound for an eight-note synth and made us all into synaesthetes for a day, which was intricate and complicated enough to warrant a dose of fun to follow. A gang of tiny blob men whirling their arms over their heads at impossible speeds? Yes, please. A tiny man on a bicycle riding in tiny circles forevermore? Go on then. Great things are in the pipeline for this master of 3D shapes, bulgy eyeballs and jumping hamburgers. You mark our words.

  14. Serpentine-pavilion-int-list

    SelgasCano’s colourful, experimental designs for this year’s Serpentine Pavilion wouldn’t look out of place at Glastonbury’s kids’ tent, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The structure, which will be in place from 25 June until 18 October, is made of materials including plastic fabric and webbing, forming a huge tunnel-like construction that forms a “journey through the space, characterised by colour, light and irregular shapes with surprising volumes,” according to the architects. SelgasCano is copmrised of Spanish architects José Selgas and Lucía Cano, and is based in Madrid. This will be the 15th Serpentine Pavilion commission, with previous designs by architects including Jean Nouvel and Frank Gehry.

  15. Kenzo-doty-list

    As with every year, the sprawling, disparate, all-over-the-shop nature of the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year show is both the brilliant thing about it and the thing that makes it so utterly disorienting. Having an Escher-inspired mobile game (Monument Valley) share space with the Google self-driving car and a sanitation system for remote, off-grid areas (Eawag’s Blue Diversion unit) makes even the least design-oriented visitor surely question the nature of what “design” itself means. Should it look beautiful? Should it make our day easier? Should it help the planet? Should it save lives?

  16. Gerard-marin-int-list

    There’s something of a trend going around at the moment for identities using 3D logo-marks, and with this one by Gerard Marin we can see why. Barcelona-based designer Gerard developed the branding, stationery and corporate materials for interior designer and visual merchandiser Neus Ortiz. Recognisability and malleability were at the forefront of his mind for this project, and the flexible “N,” which changes according to its application, prove a neat solution to both. His is an unfussy aesthetic which lends itself perfectly to branding projects – here’s hoping more make their way to him very soon.

  17. Nike-logo

    There’s a moment in this film where Michael Bierut comes over all Hayley Joel Osment in The Sixth Sense as he declares: “ I can see things in typefaces that normal people can’t.” It’s part of his discussion about how “design can be a lonely thing” and that as you immerse yourself in that world “you’re actually making yourself less normal than regular people.” Filmed at Design Indaba in South Africa last month, this interesting short film moves onto to look at logos and why designers are so interested in them. Using famous examples like the Nike swoosh and the Target, um, target, Michael explains his theory that we’re drawn to them because they’re primitive and yet we invest them with so much meaning. “A lot of what we see when we’re looking at the logo isn’t really happening in the logo; it happens in our own mind,” he explains.