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Craphound

Posted by Jez Burrows,

I’m over a decade late to Craphound, but I’ve finally caught up. Written and compiled by Sean Tejaratchi, it collects hundreds of found images, typically with two or three themes. The pictured excerpt comes from the expanded edition of Craphound #6: Death, Telephones & Scissors.

Sean’s introduction and explanations are wise, culturally savvy, and set up the goldmine of images to be properly read and appreciated, instead of flicked through like a clipart collection. He’s also just got a fantastic eye for brilliant imagery. There’s also great cover art provided by Jordan Crane.

Posted by Jez Burrows

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