Film

An interview with filmmaker Andrew Telling as his stunning new cycling film is released

Posted by Rob Alderson,

Filmmaker and composer Andrew Telling is a master of creating rich, immersive atmospheres. It’s no surprise that he’s trained in sound as well as visuals as his films marry both to create a compelling sensual experience. His just-released piece following the Rapha Condor Sharp cycling team on their Spanish training camp typifies this multi-layered brilliance and is as fine a three minutes as I have seen in a long time. He’s also just unveiled his good-looking new website giving us the perfect excuse to soak up his work in its entirety, and to ask him a few questions.

Hi Andrew, what was the thinking behind getting a new site?

Well it was well over-due an update and I felt I had the right balance between personal and commercial work where I had handled all aspects of the project from the creative, editing and scoring the music. It was important to get across that I make music as well as films. Showcasing the music as an album on the site allowed it to live alongside my films with equal importance and I’d like to say a big thanks to Chris Thompson for seamlessly bringing all the elements of my work together.

How long did the Rapha film take to shoot and what were the complexities involved? What atmosphere did you want to create?

I was with the Rapha Condor Sharp team for seven days in February out in Benidorm, Spain. I was included in all aspects of their training regime (apart from the massages much to my dismay) eating all our daily meals together, filming them whilst they rode long and hard and in the evening, team meetings where we all talked about our day.

I wanted the film to echo the constant pace of the riders on the bike but also mirror this with the normality of hotel life and down-time in the training camp. I felt it was important to show the physical and emotional stages they go through individually and how the training camp is about fitness but also building the team, mentally and physically.

The challenge from the first day was dealing with how fast the cyclists were as a team on the bike. The landscape of the mountains and rolling cherry blossom fields provided the perfect back drop but made for some interesting car tactics as we constantly tried to rush ahead of the team in the steep winding roads.

The best spur-of-the-moment was filming out of the support car’s open boot on the main descent from Sella which we attempted on the last two days. I got thrown around a lot as there was nothing to hold on to, but it made for some dynamic shots of the team and individuals, as they knew it was one long descent back to the food buffet from there.

You’ve just done your first music video haven’t you – how did you enjoy working in a new area? What were the biggest challenges involved?

I’ve just completed a short film (released on Friday) in collaboration with Felix (Lucinda Chua). I definitely enjoyed it, it was nice to get out of my comfort zone and to work with a great piece of music. The biggest challenge was taking my usual documentary aesthetic and marrying it with new narrative ideas that I had created working against the lashing storms on the open beach – the cheap umbrella that blew away in five minutes didn’t help either.

Do you get frustrated as a filmmaker knowing that a lot of people may only experience your work on their computer screen rather than a cinema etc?

Yes and no. The internet has allowed my films to reach a far greater audience and in some results has led me to talk and collaborate with my peers. My frustration is the quality of the screen, our diminishing attention spans and poor quality speakers which never fully reflect the work of editors, cameraman and composers. It’s a problem that I have been trying to factor into future projects.In an ideal scenario, I would like to present work in a controlled gallery/venue context, giving people the space to enjoy it but also allowing the audience to take away a physical part of the project; a cd/dvd or even an image or still from the film.

What’s next for you?

I am back on the road with artist Conor Harrington heading to the Scandinavian territories in July for the next chapter of our films. A follow up collaboration with artist and illustrator Hello Von is underway, I’ll be continuing my collaboration with the Felix as well as finishing some musical projects, rest of the time I’ll be sleeping in between and paying the bills…

Ra

Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Film View Archive

  1. Skrillex-doompy-poomp-int-list

    Fleur & Manu’s latest video for everyone’s favourite ex-goth Skrillex is a bit of a repetitive tale. It takes the form of a mulleted dropout failing to get a loan from his bank, and then having to relive the painful experience again and again, Groundhog Day-style until he loses his shit completely and the whole thing descends into a cross-dressing, semi-naked musical. There are some great hairy backs thrown into the mix too. With a synopsis like that how could you resist?

  2. Daniel-swan-django-django-list

    Four years after first discovering Daniel Swan’s website he’s still not bothered to put any work on it. There’s just a 3D-rendered glittery keyring that bears his name and serves as his calling card. He’s a confident man! Still, when you’re producing work as good as Daniel, you can afford to be confident. Last time we had him up on the site he had collaborated with David Rudnick on an incredible desert apocalypse for RL Grime, and this latest offering for Django Django is no less impressive.

  3. Fyi-still-11-int_copy

    In response to a “critical graphic design” brief from their tutor at Central Saint Martins, graphic design students Ellen Mercer and Lucy Streule spliced together a tonne of clips and heartfelt scenes where movie characters let each other know, “FYI I’m a graphic designer.”

  4. Crane-oscars-int-list

    There’s always a frenzy of opinions around the Oscars, as Michael Hogan Tweeted this morning: “It’s all happening over on the #oscars hashtag, if you’re interested in people who can’t type properly quacking on about film awards.” But amid all the polarised bickering and the dress-sense-rating bitchiness, it’s nice to remember the sheer amount of skill and craft that went into all the nominated films. Crane.tv has produced an interesting series which focuses on the lesser-appreciated talents who make the movie industry what it is, the most impressive of which focuses on the Whiplash sound mixer Thomas Curley. He got the nod from the Academy this year and it’s super interesting to hear him talk about the challenges of working on a film which is all about drumming, and so sound is critically important to the overall artistic effect.

  5. Farmleague-geoffmcfetridge-int-list

    We’re always interested in what Los Angeles-based artist and illustrator Geoff McFetridge has been up to. A video of him talking about making a bike sounded especially promising, but a video of him talking about making a “totally absurd” ocean-going bike? Swoon.

  6. List

    Good lord, I haven’t OMGd this hard since…possibly since anything this big and Blur-related happened last time, maybe with the release of Under the Westway, maybe when I sweatily, heart-in-mouthedly (be cool Gosling!) met Damon Albarn in a Foyles book shop. As anyone who’s been on any form of social media in the last hour will know, during a lovely long live Facebook chat with Zane Lowe this morning it was announced that Blur have recorded a new album, called The Magic Whip (their first full-length release in 12 years) revealing the very cool artwork in The Sun of all places this morning.

  7. Danny-yourd-elgin-park-int1

    From LSD, Michael Paul Smith learned that he “didn’t have to go to foreign lands to meet foreign people.” This realisation informed what he went on to dedicate his life to – creating tiny, perfect model depictions of the 20th Century, mapped out in his miniature town Elgin Park.

  8. Mazda-rebels-int-list

    Portland-based archaeologist Cameron Smith has a dream; a dream that has little to do with his chosen career path. Unable to join NASA because of his poor eyesight, Cameron’s dedicated the past few years of his life to engineering an affordable space suit that’ll enable the wearer to venture outside Earth’s atmosphere for the tiny sum of $5,000. He and his crack team of amateurs and enthusiasts are working tirelessly to get their project off the ground and into the cosmos. Why, you ask? Because they’re rebels – simple as!

  9. Creatorsclass-matthewfrost-int-list

    “My name is Matthew Frost and I make hilarious short films about famous people mostly.” So begins this excellent video profile of the brilliant British filmmaker but we’d go even further – his name’s Matthew Frost and he makes hilarious short films about famous people better than anyone else out there (from Kirsten Dunst and Lizzie Caplan to Jessica Chastain and Cate Blanchett).

  10. Inezandvinoodh-fourfiveseconds-int

    Maybe it’s because I spent all day Saturday watching Beatles documentaries, or maybe it’s because I’m feeling emotional and loving after a big lunch, but this is great. If you had told anyone five years ago that Rihanna, Kanye and Paul would team up with fashion photography powerhouse Inez and Vinoodh to create a music video, no one would have believed you. But, it’s happened. Sure Brandon Stosuy from Pitchfork just referred to it on Twitter as a GAP commercial, but I think maybe it’s stronger than that. When the collaboration was first announced I expected them to accompany it with a mindbendingly expensive blockbuster video à la Justin Timberlake’s What Goes Around…Comes Around complete with a car chase. But no, it’s stripped back, fashionable, kinda soppy and watchable. Well done Inez and Vinoodh, you’ve made this almost farcical musical trio somewhat more believable.

  11. Bremen-list

    Promoting a city or area is a tricky thing to get right. Too earnest, and you look boring; too edgy and you risk alienating families, and those of a sensitive disposition. How about going for just downright peculiar then? And a surreal cast of wooden figures?

  12. Guardian_deadlineday-int-list

    Today is one of those weird dates in the calendar that means a lot to some people, and almost nothing to everybody else. Transfer Deadline Day is the final 24 hours that football clubs are allowed to buy players before the summer, and over recent years a weird mania has built up every time it rolls around (culminating last year in the bizarre spectacle of a Sky Sports News reporter having a purple sex toy waggled in his ear).

  13. Petracollins-drivetime-list-int

    If you’re prone to being envious of impossibly beautiful creative people living dreamy lives in perpetually sunny places, I would advise you to look away now. We already knew Petra Collins was a dab hand at documenting the pleasures and perils of teenage life through her photography, but as this new film commissioned by COS and picked up on by Dazed Digital aptly demonstrates, she’s not bad at filmmaking either. Drive Time sees Petra douse life in Los Angeles with the same compelling potion that her photographs do, as she films her friends Cherry Glazerr front woman Clementine Creevy, photographer Autumn de Wilde and her daughter Arrow, artists Erin and Sam Falls and producer Asma Maroof wandering dreamily around the city, musing sweetly on the art scene there. It’s hazy and sun-soaked and plays into the hands of all the best cliches Hollywood entertains. Which, from time to time, is precisely what you need.