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    Fort Standard: Life Is Precious

Product Design

Survive in the wild, or maybe just in your garden, with help from Fort Standard

Posted by James Cartwright,

The first time we posted Fort Standard’s work you could have been forgiven for thinking that they weren’t exactly heavyweight designers. We loved their geometric Balancing Blocks for their playfulness and charm but you’d have been hard-pushed to suggest that they were essential items – I can’t really think of an instance in which red, blue and green wooden shapes would get you out of a fix.

Their latest project, however, is the kind of object you ought never to leave home without. Life Is Precious is a beautifully-designed compact survival kit that fits comfortably within a neatly machined metal tube. Commissioned by Wallaper* to produce an object for their Handmade show at the Salone Del Mobile, they set out to “design a survival kit… which looked and felt as precious as its contents. An object you could easily bring with you on a day hike or even keep in your car or boat, but most importantly an object you would WANT to bring with you everywhere.”

Including a compass, matches, fishing wire and whistle as well as a pen knife and sewing kit, we’re confident that this is the kind of gear that’d save you in the wild, but with such impeccable attention paid to its design there’s no doubt that Fort Standard have created an object of covetable beauty too.

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    Fort Standard: Life Is Precious

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    Fort Standard: Life Is Precious

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

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