• Ngdhero

    Acconci Studio: City of Words (2010) Courtesy Maharam Digital Projects (detail)

Graphic Design

Major graphic design show set to open in New York featuring the best work of the millennium

Posted by Rob Alderson,

If you wanted to find out about the state of the pig farming industry you could feasibly get a load of pig farmers together, interview them and write an article about their porcine concerns and aspirations. But in a visual media like graphic design, state-of-the-industry hand-wringing seems oddly out of kilter in print – don’t tell me, show me.

Graphic Design – Now in Production aims to do just that, looking at how things have changed since the turn of the millennium, as widely-available creative software democratises the methods if not the skills, and user generated content blurs traditional boundaries. Meanwhile the rise of the polygot who works across several disciplines has challenged the way designers are seen, and see themselves.

First shown at the Walker Art Center late last year, this week it opens in New York at the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum designed by heavyweight studio Project Projects.

According the organisers, the show, “explores the worlds of design-driven magazines, newspapers, books and posters; the expansion of branding programs for corporations, institutions and subcultures; the entrepreneurial spirit of designer-produced goods; the renaissance in digital typeface design; the storytelling potential of film and television titling sequences; and the transformation of raw data into compelling information narratives.”

The curatorial team sees leading museum experts joined by Jeremy Leslie of MagCulture and Ian Albison of Art of the Title bringing an eclectic mix of voices to the selection and organisation of the exhibits. Bill Moggrdidge, director of the museum said: "This ambitious exhibition looks at cutting edge ideas and breaking cultural revolutions in the world of graphic design. Focusing on design in the 21st century, this exhibition provides insight into the phenomena shaping culture today and transforming traditional conceptions of graphic design practice.”

The show runs May 26 until September 3.

  • Mellier_poster

    Fanette Mellier: Specimen (2008)

  • 01_oil_water

    Anthony Burrill: Oil & Water Do Not Mix (2010)

  • Antoine_et_manuel_poster

    Antoine et Manuel: Comedie de Clermont Saison 2011-2012

  • Apeloig_poster

    Phillippe Apeloig: Crossing teh Line FIAF Fall Festival 2010 (Courtesy Studio Apeloig)

  • Clark_cluster_typography

    Christopher Clark: Web Typography for the Lonely: Cluster (2011)

  • Experimental_jetset_poster

    Experimental Jetset: Statement and Counter-Statement (2011)

  • Fozouni_poster

    Farhad Fozouni,: 7 Commandments for Becoming Contemporary (2008)

  • Schuurman_poster

    Michiel Schuurman: BROKEN GLASS EVERYWHERE (2010)

  • Bennewith_book

    David Bennewith: Churchward International Typefaces (2009) Photo by Franz Vos

  • Fnc_blank_b_sm_c

    Aaron Draplin and Coudal Partners: Field Notes (dry transfer letter version) (2011)

  • Maharam_cyan_wallcovering

    cyan: Flieger (2010( (Courtesy Maharam Digital Products)

  • Forsman_ikea_book_1

    Forsman and Bodenfors, Evelina Bratell and Carl Kleiner: Homemade is Best (2010)

  • Forsman_ikea_book_2

    Forsman and Bodenfors, Evelina Bratell and Carl Kleiner: Homemade is Best (2010)

  • Future_1_hi_res

    Sean Freeman and Craig Ward: The Future (2008)

  • Maharam_acconci_wallcovering

    Acconci Studio: City of Words (2010) Courtesy Maharam Digital Projects

  • Akkurat_typography

    Laurenz Brunner: Akkurat 2005 Courtesy Lineto

  • Buchanan_smith_badges

    Peter Buchanan-Smith: C.C.G.F. Badge Set Best Made Products, 2009

  • Sosolimited_info

    Justin Manor, John Rothenberg and Eric Gunther: Set Top Box (2010) (Courtesy Sosolimited)

  • Des2011gd_cat_0729_020

    Richard Spencer-Powell: Monocle, vol. 5, no. 45, July/August 2011

  • Des2011gd_cat_0801_068

    Jop van Bennekom: The Gentlewoman, issue 3, Spring/Summer 2011

  • Karen_magazine

    Karen: Karen issue 3, 2007

  • Pin_up_magazine

    Felix Burrichter and Dylan Fracareta: Pin-Up issue 10, Spring/Summer 2011

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Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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