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    Lapo: Little Feet (detail)

Illustration

Illustration: Lisbon-based illustrator Lapo's series In Paris is almost too lovely

Posted by Maisie Skidmore,

Lapo is almost too charming for words. The Lisbon-based illustrator was born in Rio de Janeiro and studied at London’s Central Saint Martins before moving to Portugal, where her illustrative projects are growing rapidly. Such collections range from the ongoing Viana, in which she draws portraits of 14 residents from Viana do Castelo in Lisbon, to Pet Love, which ensures correct caring for loved animals.

My favourite though is In Paris, a series of 25 drawings about life in the French capital, including such nuggets of wisdom as “In Paris all dancers at the Crazy Horse cabaret are chosen to be indistinguishable on stage in height and in breast size and shape” and “In Paris watch out for Vincent Cassels.” Her observations about the French and their ways are timelessly funny and adorably executed, so you’ll still find joy in them from the comfort of your own home.

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    Lapo: Vintage Shops

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    Lapo: Cabaret

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    Lapo: No Time for Lunch

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    Lapo: Dogs Don’t Bite

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    Lapo: Pause Cigarette

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    Lapo: WC I

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    Lapo: Nude

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    Lapo: Vincent

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    Lapo: Les Prostitutes

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    Lapo: Little Feet

Ms-300

Posted by Maisie Skidmore

Assistant Editor Maisie joined It’s Nice That fresh out of university in the summer of 2013 and has stayed with us ever since. She has a particular interest in art, fashion and photography and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast. She also oversees our London listings guide This At There.

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