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Work / Photography

Remi Chapeaublanc: Gods and Beasts

Remi Chapeaublanc is quite the rugged individualist – the French photographer recently set out solo to traverse Mongolia astride a motorcycle, carting camera equipment along with the usual adventuring fare (food, tent, and toothbrush, I presume). The result is this stunning collection of images which distill an enigmatic environment down to two fundamentals: its people and its animals. By exploring their dialectic visual relationship, Chapeaublanc marries portraiture with documentary to create images that are so beautiful, so sparse, you’ll swear you can still hear the wind whistling through a barren Mongol wilderness.