• St-mandrill_web_large

    Sam Chivers: Saint Mandrill

Illustration

Submerse yourself in the unconscious world of Sam Chivers

Posted by Holly Wilkins,

Surreal landscapes and detached narratives are the fundamentals for Sam Chivers, a Brighton-based artist and illustrator. His is a world where nature and shapes collide, and monkeys rein free – I suspect something rather mental goes on inside Sam’s head! At a young age, Sam was inspired by Jean ‘Moebius’ Giraud, the God of comic artists, and since then has developed his love for drawing with sumptuous style.

Describing his own work as “science fiction, cosmical and the fantastical, and an innate love of landscape,” I challenge you to look at his work and not be bowled over by this guy’s vivid imagination.

  • 8587341318_05fe3a8a2b_o

    Sam Chivers: Print for Pick Me Up

  • Distant-gods_faded-suns

    Sam Chivers: Distant Gods/Faded Suns

  • Tetrahedron_web

    Sam Chivers: Tetrahedron

  • Untitled

    Sam Chivers: Untitled

  • Untitled1

    Sam Chivers: Untitled

  • Lux_volca

    Sam Chivers: Lux Volca

  • Egon_01

    Sam Chivers: End Game of Nothing

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Posted by Holly Wilkins

Holly worked with us as an editorial intern after studying at Leeds University and working in the PR industry in Los Angeles for a short period. She wrote for the site between March and May 2013.

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