• Things_big

    Things

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

Miscellaneous

Things

Posted by James Cartwright,

I love post. You love post. We love post together. And for that simple reason we bring you Things, a chance for you to snoop though the contents of our mailbag with the unbridled enthusiasm of a vagrant in a dumpster. This week we’ve been inundated with goodness, but as usual we’ve skimmed the cream from the top and arranged it into easily digestible chunks (mixed metaphor?) of wholesome creativity. Enjoy.

The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review (or ar as it would now like to be known) is one old dog that’s happy to learn new tricks, with a spanking new redesign, abbreviated name and accompanying logo. Given its 120-year history and position as the foremost architecture magazine on the newsstands it’s no mean feat to have embraced change a successfully as it has. But it looks great, reads better than ever and has adopted a new attitude to photography that allows the buildings pictured more space to breathe. Nice work.
www.architectural-review.com

The Sweet Science Zines Nick Alston

Nick Alston is an illustrator infatuated with boxing, and to satisfy his passion he’s produced a selection of zines celebrating that most violent of sports. Ever wondered what the heavyweights get up to in their spare time? Dared to imagine what boxing and ballet have in common? Well don’t bother, Nick’s done all that for you and provided a terrific set of accompanying illustrations. Thanks Nick.
www.nickalston.co.uk

Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful Dawn Ng

Paris is undoubtedly one of the greatest cities on earth – great art, great food, great nightlife. Everyone loves that place right? Wrong. When Dawn Ng moved there last year she found herself strung-out and sad, lost in a strange land. To prevent herself from losing the plot entirely she began a self-initiated project to create an object a day. Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful documents this process beautifully with an oversized magazine featuring full-bleed photographs of the objects interspersed with song lyrics and excerpts from children’s stories. Catharsis can be well-designed too.
www.dawn-ng.com

The Impossible: Arc #15 Edited by Charmian Griffin. Design by Hannah Montague

It’s a genuine pleasure to get our hands on the Royal College of Art journal, Arc. Now in its fifteenth inception, this issue – a surprisingly un-festive green and red number – focusses on the nebulous theme of “the impossible.” Including notable contributions from the comic monolith Alan Moore, an interview with YouTube’s young dad, Chad Hurley and a photo essay on the wonder filled studio of Peter Blake. Top content as presided over by Charmian Griffin and deserved applause for the art direction and design by Hannah Montague.
www.rcamagazine.co.uk

My Life In Print Sappi

If print is dead then the paper industry needs to watch its back too. But we don’t think it is, and neither do the folks over at wood-free paper makers Sappi. So convinced are they of this fact they’ve produced a rather lovely magazine dedicated to showing how printed matter touches people all across the world. With some lovely stories and great illustration from Dave Sparshott its sure to appeal to even the most hardened Kindle users out there.
www.sappi.com

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Miscellaneous View Archive

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    “I’ve been thinking about this forever and want a woman’s touch”…"In shape, 29 y/o, six feet tall"…"I know it sounds crazy but it’s a fantasy of mine for a woman to"… These are the most SFW snippets we can publish from a rather nuts, very rude new project by Cartelle Interactive, the people that brought us the brilliant, trippy J Dilla Donuts tribute, Dilla Dimension.

  2. Skipyoutube-int-list

    There is a world of weird and wonderful videos out there on YouTube but like most people I barely scratch the surface day-to-day. So a new project from Bertie Muller and Matthew Britton is helping address that with the aid only of a “skip” button.

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    Step aside Freud with your tedious dream analysis and your dirty mind, Photoshop Your Dreams is here with an altogether more entertaining alternative. 26 year-old Margaux Espinasse is web project manager based in Berlin, and she’s just set up the site, which asks readers to submit their dreams in order for her to recreate them in Photoshop.

  4. Unnamed

    As creative director of Bloomberg Businessweek Richard Turley helped revitalise the formerly staid title with his eye-catching covers and open-minded approach to lay-outs. When he moved to MTV last year many in the magazine world were sad (and surprised) to see him leave print behind. Yesterday we ran the first part of of our in-depth interview with Richard, in which he talked about his reasons for leaving BBW and what he’s been trying to achieve at MTV. In the second part today he talks about the need to shout about his new role and shares his thoughts on the respective design scenes in London and New York…

  5. Screen-shot-2015-02-10-at-14.31.20

    It was in April last year that news broke that Bloomberg Businessweek’s much-lauded creative director Richard Turley was leaving to join MTV as its first senior vice president of visual storytelling and deputy editorial director. It was hailed as a huge coup for the network but surprised some that a man who’d been such a passionate, brilliant and at times iconoclastic part of the magazine renaissance was leaving the print industry behind.

  6. Exposure-bjorn-borg-int-list

    When you think of Björn Borg you think of great tennis, luxurious golden locks and really expensive underpants – or at least I do, particularly the pants. What I don’t think of is high octane online gaming, of gun-toting lovers destroying negative bad guys on screen, or of a shirtless man riding a giant bear. But then, what do I know; apparently that’s exactly what Björn Borg is all about these days.

  7. Main2

    Did you know there are 722 Emoji options? I don’t know about you but I tend to use the same five over and over, they’re like talismans of my soul (if you’re asking: rowing man, sitting monkey, balloon, yellow sun face and chick coming out of egg). There’s a new site fluttering around the internet at the moment that allows you to pick any Emoji from the astonishingly extensive menu and create your own “art” with it. Slide the small toolbar in the bottom right to enlarge the Emoji of your choice and you can make scenes you have always dreamt of. For example: farting pig rides small stripey yacht while being chased by frog heads pushed along in the current by front crawl swimmers who, in turn, are being chased by happy little piles of poop. Fun! Also a big thanks to Josh King of King Zog for pointing us towards this gem.

  8. List_nice-sale

    If your New Year’s resolutions include being sensible with your cash and owning more great creative stuff, then have we got the sale for you. Just before Christmas we went through our storeroom and decided to reduce the amount of archive stuff we keep, so for one day only this Friday we’re opening the doors of our east London studio where we’ll be selling off magazines, books and T-shirts from just £1!

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    We recently came across Scottish artist Sam Lyon who resides in Dundee and makes these jiggling, nonsensical, fleshy GIFs. The creatures channel Flubber, sea cucumbers and those floppy little rubber sausages you used to get at school. The technical skill it must take to make them is beyond me I’m afraid, so I can’t shed any light on how this is done, but what I can say is that Sam’s style has the winning formula of hilarious, addictive and brand new. Every face-crease, every stomach bulge, every wobbly bit is so over-pronounced, and moves as if it’s full of goo. I’ve never seen anything quite like this before, have you? You can see the inspiration behind these little guys over on Sam’s entertaining and brilliant blog. It’s also worth saying that anyone who codes a fried egg GIF on to their cursor is post-worthy in my book.

  10. List

    Santa’s an old rogue isn’t he? What with his rosy cheeks and his big fat belly and his enslavement of innocent reindeers for commercial reasons. Still, he’s an enduring icon of Christmas whether we like it or not and as such he’s fair game when it comes to creative interpretations of the festive season. So the good people over at Joint London took old Saint Nick (the Coca-Cola version) and decided to doll him up in all manner of high fashion looks, from Alexander Wang and KENZO to Marni and Raf Simons. It’s a fun project, executed well and the site itself is lovely to scroll through. I also like that Rick Owens Santa looks like a good-time Brian Blessed…

  11. List

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but this time of year we get a fair bit of festive tat sent into the studio, which makes anything Christmas-related that is actually good stand out all the more. One of the things we actually always look forward to seeing is the Christmas card from London agency isobel, which we first feted on the site two years ago. In the past their offerings have included an homage to The Sound of Music (2007), a team of Glee-style cheerleaders (2010) and most memorably of all a tribute to the paintings of the Dutch Masters (2011), but this year they’ve plumped for something a little more monastic.

  12. Main1

    Stuff like this never gets boring. Remember that super-ancient computer program that allowed you to type something in and have the computer read it aloud? Perfect when you want a machine to tell your big brother that he smells of poop. This cool site by Thirty Labs is similar in that you get to pick what the computer says aloud to you, but different in that the words it compiles are made up of tiny snippets of films. So great to have rude, funny, or just plain boring messages read out by Darth Vader, Garth Elgar, Napoleon Dynamite and Hades from Hercules. Enjoy!

  13. Main1

    People seem to have a real problem with “life hacks” – and you can see why. Some nerd being overly smug about how he’s Sellotaped all his channel changers together isn’t exactly appealing. These guys have taken the whole “hack” craze and made a spoof website of hilarious, often disgusting hacks of their own. One entitled Raw Meat Circuitry sees a pack of mince get stuffed with LEDs and lit up, another entitled The Collaborative Fuck Bike is an easy way to exercise and pleasure your partner. As for the future, the guys behind Stupid Hackathon are plotting “3D printed masks of your own face, a Cute Poop app that makes pictures of your poop look cute and an Edible Unmanned Drone: an unmanned drone that you can eat.” Can’t wait.