• Things_big

    Things

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Architectural Review

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    The Sweet Science Zines

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    Arc

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

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    My Life in Print

Miscellaneous

Things

Posted by James Cartwright,

I love post. You love post. We love post together. And for that simple reason we bring you Things, a chance for you to snoop though the contents of our mailbag with the unbridled enthusiasm of a vagrant in a dumpster. This week we’ve been inundated with goodness, but as usual we’ve skimmed the cream from the top and arranged it into easily digestible chunks (mixed metaphor?) of wholesome creativity. Enjoy.

The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review (or ar as it would now like to be known) is one old dog that’s happy to learn new tricks, with a spanking new redesign, abbreviated name and accompanying logo. Given its 120-year history and position as the foremost architecture magazine on the newsstands it’s no mean feat to have embraced change a successfully as it has. But it looks great, reads better than ever and has adopted a new attitude to photography that allows the buildings pictured more space to breathe. Nice work.
www.architectural-review.com

The Sweet Science Zines Nick Alston

Nick Alston is an illustrator infatuated with boxing, and to satisfy his passion he’s produced a selection of zines celebrating that most violent of sports. Ever wondered what the heavyweights get up to in their spare time? Dared to imagine what boxing and ballet have in common? Well don’t bother, Nick’s done all that for you and provided a terrific set of accompanying illustrations. Thanks Nick.
www.nickalston.co.uk

Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful Dawn Ng

Paris is undoubtedly one of the greatest cities on earth – great art, great food, great nightlife. Everyone loves that place right? Wrong. When Dawn Ng moved there last year she found herself strung-out and sad, lost in a strange land. To prevent herself from losing the plot entirely she began a self-initiated project to create an object a day. Thirty One Kinds of Wonderful documents this process beautifully with an oversized magazine featuring full-bleed photographs of the objects interspersed with song lyrics and excerpts from children’s stories. Catharsis can be well-designed too.
www.dawn-ng.com

The Impossible: Arc #15 Edited by Charmian Griffin. Design by Hannah Montague

It’s a genuine pleasure to get our hands on the Royal College of Art journal, Arc. Now in its fifteenth inception, this issue – a surprisingly un-festive green and red number – focusses on the nebulous theme of “the impossible.” Including notable contributions from the comic monolith Alan Moore, an interview with YouTube’s young dad, Chad Hurley and a photo essay on the wonder filled studio of Peter Blake. Top content as presided over by Charmian Griffin and deserved applause for the art direction and design by Hannah Montague.
www.rcamagazine.co.uk

My Life In Print Sappi

If print is dead then the paper industry needs to watch its back too. But we don’t think it is, and neither do the folks over at wood-free paper makers Sappi. So convinced are they of this fact they’ve produced a rather lovely magazine dedicated to showing how printed matter touches people all across the world. With some lovely stories and great illustration from Dave Sparshott its sure to appeal to even the most hardened Kindle users out there.
www.sappi.com

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Miscellaneous View Archive

  1. House-announcement

    Sound the conch folks, we have some exciting news from It’s Nice That HQ. We’re restructuring and expanding our team and so we have not one but two great opportunities to come and be part of our team.

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    A sincere, golden corner of the internet here: The Datamath Calculator Museum. The online museum is a historic, matter-of-fact and outrageously in-depth look at the history of calculators in the modern world. Remember the first time that a “scientific calculator” appeared on your back-to-school list? This trove will take you hurtling back to sitting in double maths using that very machine to write “boobless” (80087355) over and over again until the bell rang.

  3. List_image

    Over the course of seven years It’s Nice That has been providing creative inspiration on a daily basis through our website, our publications and our events programme. But never ones to rest on our laurels, we are always reviewing what we do and how we do it. This is where you (hopefully!) come in. As part of our ongoing development of the It’s Nice That platforms, we’re super-keen to find out a bit more about who you are and find out what you like about the website, what you don’t and what you might like to see in the future. This way we can move It’s Nice That forward with plans that put our readers front and centre.

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    If ever the high and the low brow were to come together in the project of my dreams, it would look like this series by James Kerr, AKA Scorpion Dagger. The artist and frighteningly capable GIF wizard has struck an absolute goldmine with his website devoted to Renaissance artworks reworked into outrageously funny GIFs. In case you’re not persuaded, this isn’t the equivalent of an Oprah hairflick or Barack Obama looking at a fly; these GIFs have narratives, they have beginnings, middles and ends, they have multiple settings and jokes and punchlines and they are almost too good to be true.

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    There’s a day for for everything now; and last week we all celebrated World Emoji Day didn’t we? What do you mean you didn’t know? Seems pretty remiss of you if you don’t mind me saying. Anyway luckily the excellent folk over at Funny Or Die were much more on the ball than some people we won’t name and they marked the momentous occasion with a ridiculously silly blog of Rejected Emojis. With the help of Jesse Benjamin, Avery Monsen and Darryl Gudmundson, they compiled a Tumblr of offerings which ranged from the surreal to the sinister, the bizarre to the almost-could-be-true. That sad clown will haunt my dreams.

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    It’s common for people to imagine that they see faces made out of the shapes and folds of everyday objects: It seems to be a human trait that we like to see ourselves in the world around us. We look up at the clouds and imagine that we see the outlines of faces and body parts, and at night we convince ourselves that a rumpled item of clothing thrown over a chair is really a sinister grinning figure.

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    Well, this is terrifying. Internet-loving artist Mario Santamaria has taken advantage of Google’s scheme to take the world into art galleries and ornate buildings all over the world by collecting screenshots of moments where the Google camera catches its own reflection in a mirror. Ghostly figures interact with the camera in some shots, and in others the machinery is draped with a weird silver cloth – first prize goes to the person who can identify what this cloth actually does. For me this is the best Google-related blog since Jon Rafman’s 9 Eyes and is hopefully a new dawn for simple, spine-tingling projects that linger with you just a smidge longer than you’d like.

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    Webcomics are another medium to emerge from the digital sphere, and a very interesting one at that; Bird’s Eye China is just another example of how funny, accessible and scathing they can be. The Tumblr blog is made up of screenshots from Baidu maps, a kind of Chinese online mapping service not dissimilar to Google Maps, but brilliantly, looks just like SimCity.

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    “The sun is always rising somewhere; breakfast is always just about to happen. Dinner time in Dakar is breakfast time in Brisbane. And in the background of breakfast is radio, soundtrack to a billion bowls of cereal or congee, shakshuka or api, porridge or changua.” Well, we certainly couldn’t have put that any better ourselves. Global Breakfast Radio arrived in my inbox courtesy of ex-It’s Nice That writer Bryony Quinn. The concept is simple and immediately engrossing: a live radio that streams breakfast shows from around the world as and when they happen. In their own words, “it’s the equivalent of a plane flying west with the sunrise, constantly tracking the chatter and music of people across the planet.”

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    Creative briefs come in all shapes and sizes, but opportunities to create work for one of the most popular and ubiquitous brands in there world don’t come round very often. That’s what makes this one so exciting, with our friends over at Talenthouse on the hunt for artists, designers, filmmakers and animators to create artwork for Spotify’s new #nowfeeling campaign which is built on the way music inspires and informs our relationships with the world, and each other.

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    The amount of games out there is fairly mind-boggling and there are new ones flooding the market all the time. In the face of this kind of overload what’s needed are curators; people who know what they’re talking about, who can be trusted and who have great taste. Step forward then Cowboy Picks, a new archive of “inspiring game design” put together by the fine folks behind interaction design agency Hover Studio and animation production company Animade.

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    It’s a universally acknowledged truth that the week back to work after a long weekend drags like no other, so with that in mind, we’re bringing you some light entertainment to break up your Thursday afternoon and while away the hours until Friday hits.

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    The average Beyoncé fan’s repertoire is fairly complete, as far as these things go; on top of the extensive merchandise and the dedicated online community (the Beyhive) there are bookmarked folders full to the brim with Tumblrs and fan-sites and even a dedicated Soundboard. What they don’t have, however, is an art gallery full of the one woman superstar’s family portraits. Or they didn’t, at least. They do now.