Article Archive

  1. Snask-printing-friends-int-list

    “Oh for Christ’s sake how many more independent food magazines could there possibly be?” someone is probably asking right now as they look at this article – and to be fair to them, they’d have a point. But fret not, we aren’t here to herald the arrival of another culinary periodical geared towards the aesthetically-minded foodie. This is in fact Issue 8 of the litho-lover’s fanbook, Printing Friends and the food theme is just a one-off.

  2. List

    British photographer Carl Bigmore is living out a childhood obsession with the USA. The Londoner has just rounded off a project called Between Two Mysteries that’s seen him trawling the Pacific Northwest documenting the daily lives of its inhabitants; using personal pop culture references to contextualise the people he meets. “Since settlers followed the perilous Oregon Trail in search of prosperity in the 1800s,” he says, “the American imagination has left its imprint on the landscape. Oregon is forever haunted by the Overlook Hotel in Kubrick’s The Shining and its chilling analysis of the nation’s conflicted soul.”

  3. Two-int-list

    Italian studio Think Work Observe designed a pricelist for furniture design company Tacchini and it’s made an already delectable furniture collection even more appealing. Its use of close to fifty shades of grey and austere, considered layout of sofas and chairs gives the publication a lifespan and potential audience you wouldn’t otherwise expect for a brand’s pricelist. Every technical detail in Tacchini’s collection is covered and all on lovely Fedrigoni papers.

  4. Jacksmith-npg-int-list

    For the first time ever a show at the National Portrait Gallery in London contains no human faces. Jack Smith: Abstract Portraits which opened late last week is the first exhibition in the gallery’s 159-year history that includes no figurative portraits as Smith’s work is made up of abstract shapes and colours. Of course there’s nothing new about the idea of a portrait being something other than a traditional head and shoulders painting, but it is noteworthy that one of London’s leading galleries should take such a decisive step.

  5. Galvin-bros--int-list

    Driving through the Yorkshire countryside in a big, silver, Galvin Brothers van, it’s clear as the country air that this is a company that’s resolutely tied to its roots in the small town of Beverley, near Hull. Co-founder Matthew Galvin, who’s behind the wheel, seems to know everyone: he waves at a man walking his dog, who it turns out has worked with the brothers on a few bits and bobs, he points out his mum’s old house on a gorgeous chocolate box street, and we spend an hour or so in the beautiful Galvin Brothers shop, manned by the lovely lady herself. Perhaps it’s a northern thing, this sense of everyone mucking in, community and friendliness; perhaps it’s because Matt’s just a really nice bloke. Either way, it’s surely these qualities that have helped see the company take its place as one of the most sought after and respected UK furniture brands in only two years.

  6. Beakus-philippa-perry-int-list

    It’s been an impressive fortnight at Beakus HQ with great animations coming thick and fast from their team of directors. Last week we lapped up their exploration of the origins of the Magna Carta for the British Museum, in which Gergely Wootsch’s drawings were expertly combined with Terry Jones’ distinctive voice.

  7. Gilesduley-legacyofwar-int-list

    A few months ago I had a beer with Giles Duley and conversation turned to what he was up to work-wise. He was relaxed, breezy even, when he told me he was hoping to launch a multi-faceted, multi-platform exploration of the ongoing effects of conflicts after they’ve supposedly ended. It sounded insanely ambitious; it also made whatever my professional plans were at the time seem pathetically puny. But on Friday, Giles’ project Legacy of War became a reality as it reached its £20,000 Kickstarter goal.

  8. Weekender-list

    To celebrate the astrological enigma and apocalyptically exciting event that was today’s eclipse – which we all saw, and wasn’t an anti-climax at all – here’s The Weekender! A round-up of the art and design news that has eclipsed everything else this week, at least in our eyes. Happy Weekend!

  9. Kg-int-main

    Having moved to New York in the early 1980s to pursue her visual art career, Kim Gordon fell into playing music off the back of downtown Manhattan’s no wave scene and its collapse. Her first musical performance was in an exhibition of the artist Dan Graham, who had asked her to perform as part of an all-girl band, which she said afterwards had been like a “high-altitude ride.” Soon after, Sonic Youth was formed and now we have Girl in a Band; the memoir of the band, Kim’s artwork, relationships, growing up and the cities that framed it all. We spoke to Kim earlier this week about umbrella terms, suburbia and not being boring.

  10. Angiewang-int-main

    Angie Wang is FANTASTIC, she’s hands-down my absolute favourite new illustrator. Her work is an explosive, jelly bean-coloured tangle of cool girls, comic books, hair, nature and clouds: dreamy waves of cuteness and attitude floating along on the backs of ghosts. Some of her drawings may appear silly and adorable, but underneath the fuzziness is a melancholy wisdom of the world around her. She has an ability to capture what only the best kinds of comics do: aspects of life that are loving, scary, otherworldly and magnificent.

  11. Craigoldham-int-main

    Last week a book arrived in our office via the hands of It’s Nice That director Alex Bec. He told us all it was created by Craig Oldham, who he had just seen give a brilliant talk about the creation of the publication. It’s called In Loving Memory of Work, and it is a spectacularly well-designed, excitingly and refreshingly well-informed book documenting the UK miners’ strike between 1984 and 1985. For something so long, violent and shocking that happened in recent history, I’ve sometimes felt that the miners’ strike hasn’t really been talked about as much as it should have been. But I can see why: it’s hard to get to grips with something that horrible happening to so many people and so nearby.

  12. Gaggero-ra-annual-report-int-list

    Proving that annual reports don’t have to be painfully dull, here’s a great example of a fab design studio working with a fab client to get all those tricky numbers and things down in a visually engaging, clear and rather beautiful way. Said client is the Royal Academy, and said studio is Gaggero Works, which created the designs around the concept that “the RA is a place where art happens; a place where art is made, exhibited and debated.” The report is split into two books, Accounts and Report, bound together using a bright yellow belly band which adds a much needed line of playfulness under the rather heavy-going subject matter.

  13. Zeloot-int-list-2

    Look at the giant bulbous characters! The boy clamping his hand between his own giant gnashers! The tiny hairy willy floating in mid-air with a bunch of other body parts! This collection could be the work of one woman only and that woman is Eline Van Dam, aka Zeloot, a Dutch illustrator with a taste for the funny, the weird and the generally brilliant. She’s been hard at work of late with a stack of commissions for the likes of Vrij Nederland and The New York Times among others, all of whom are thoroughly enamoured with her unique style. As are we.

  14. Jayme-spinks-int-list

    Frustratingly we’ve just put together a feature on Montreal for the Spring 2015 issue of Printed Pages and if we’d known of Jayme’s existence before yesterday we’d definitely have asked her to show us around. Hers is a diverse range of clients and projects that encompass everything from playful (award-winning) sexual health resources for queer women, to slick, sensual record sleeves for Canadian singer/songwriter Dinah Thorpe. In between there are artist books, posters and exhibition catalogues, all of which demonstrate Jayme’s tailored approach to design; never relying on stylistic tropes or trends of the moment.

  15. Barzilai-int-list

    If you’re currently experiencing some love-related dramas allow me to gently suggest you don’t take them to Pauline Barzilaï for sorting. The French illustrator’s new project Les Peines de l’Amour, a sweet illustrated series on rose pink paper, takes a great sledgehammer to tender affairs of the heart, and smashes them all to pieces with a brutally funny satirical edge.

  16. Annaginsburg-int-list

    I can imagine that pitching for music videos can be a really interesting process: “Well, we’re going to dress her up in an outfit made of dog treats and hot dog sausages, and have her run around in an underground carpark with two massive Alsatians.”

  17. Acarpenters-dancing-3-int_copy

    Adam Carpenter is quite rightly Instagram-famous for his daily 15-second dance videos, which have now been turned into three minutes and 23 seconds of dancing for Low Cut Connie’s new music video Shake It Little Tina. The video sees Adam jiggle his way through old people’s homes, hospital appointments, interactions with law enforcers and pool-side antics. As much as we all like to perpetuate the impression of high-brow humour, there are few things more entertaining than pretending to fart fireworks whilst dressed up like Uncle Sam at a sports day.

  18. Studio-audience-lemon_list

    Fantastic podcast this week in which we discuss some art and design news including the new Alexander McQueen show at the V&A, a Tinder bot sensation sweeping over SXSW Festival, and how you can delve into the creative culture of a city when you are only there for a short while. Thanks to everyone who got in touch this week and for your kind words and a BIG thank you to designer David Pearson who submitted our opening question. Any other feedback much appreciated, just tweet in or leave comments in the box below. See ya next week!

  19. Kinfolk_14.cover

    The latest issue of Gym Class magazine has an eye-catching cover; with bold block capitals on a black background spelling out: “Nobody cares about your oh-so-cool, Kickstarted, tactile, minimalist unoriginal magazine.” It’s intended as a “call to action,” Gym Class editor Steven Gregor told MagCulture, “make magazines, and make them exceptional.”

  20. Kindlecoverdisasters-int-list

    This has been doing the rounds on social media for a few days now but we couldn’t not take the chance to celebrate magnificent blog Kindle Cover Disasters. It does what it says in the URL, collating some of the most eye-poppingly bizarre e-book covers its anonymous author can find and/or is sent by a network of contributors equally enthusiastic about unearthing some (reportedly) true graphic one-offs. Adorning books about sex, fantasy (the other kind) and who-the-heck knows what else, it’s a joyous celebration of the democratisation of design in the modern era. If rules are there to be broken, then these visuals take that as an extreme provocation.

  21. Calm-and-collected-sad-int-list

    About a month ago we stepped off a gloomy grey street in east London and into the rays of an indoor sunshine. At Protein Space in east London a giant orange light was recreating the warmth that emanates from the sun, a steelpan ensemble in the corner was spewing out tropical melodies, and a whole wall plastered in fluorescent illustration and artworks was attracting everybody within a five metre radius, like moths to a printerly flame. The occasion was S.A.D, a weekend exhibition put on by the lads behind Studio Calm & Collected to assuage the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, brought on by the relentless British winter.

  22. It's-nice-that_htc_web-204-list

    Last night we hosted an evening of talks exploring the pursuit of brilliance to celebrate the UK launch of the HTC One M9 smartphone. Held at the Protein Space in east London, the event featured four speakers whose creative practice is built around an uncompromising quest for excellence and they each brought an enlightening perspective to the topic.

  23. Ohpearch-id-4-int_copy

    While casually knocking out impressive videos for Jungle, Oliver Hadlee Pearch has also been building up a fine portfolio of editorial photography. There’s a great atmosphere to his work; humour, poise and the impression that Oliver and his models have their tongues firmly in their cheeks. Even while performing incredible feats of synchronised dancing and photographing golden babes amongst Memphis furniture there’s an enviable sense of ease to his work, or rather confidence in the set-ups and their outcome. It’s refreshing to see someone with such a singular aesthetic running with it, and maintaining it so successfully.

  24. Main1

    As numerous Instagram posts will testify, people just love to look at buildings getting knocked down. There’s something so captivating about that huge, brutal, utter destruction and the debris it brings. Perhaps it reminds us of the fleeting transience of life itself. Perhaps we just love mess, cranes and diggers. Either way, this surely universal fascination with smashing shit up means that we’re very, very into a new project from Alina Schmuch, a photographer who has put together the book Script of Demolition.

  25. Davidchathas-posters-header-int

    Graphic designer David Chathas creates posters that are funny, busy, bright and have just the right amount of 80s pop references to boot. He’s currently studying for his MFA at CalArts, and while doing so pumps out brilliant posters for film screenings, lectures and exhibitions across the university. There’s incredible breadth to his work – David seems to be constantly applying new aesthetics that depend on the content or context in front of him. David quite aptly describes his website as the “super-cool-guy, creative danger zone!” He’s spot on.

  26. Beakus-bl-14-int

    With a voiceover from Monty Python’s Terry Jones, Beakus’ animation commemorating the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta takes us back to mediaeval England and Bad King John. Commissioned by the British Library for their exhibition Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy, the animation was inspired by the colours and motifs in mediaeval ornaments and tells the story of our origins of liberty through jiggly paper and characters with bulbous bodies and tiny heads.

  27. Benjamin-dittrich-int-list

    German graphic artist Benjamin Dittrich is principally concerned with scale at both a micro and macro level. He preoccupies himself with subjects as large as the cosmos and as minute as molecular structures, zooming in and out in his textural works to reveal vast and complex systems. His retro-futuristic work is breathtakingly complex, utilising painted and printed layers to launch you though time and space. He’s got a new show opening at Spinnerei Archiv Massiv tonight in Leipzig, which if you’re based nearby we’d urge you to get down to. Utterly beautiful stuff!

  28. Cd-package-city-forgiveness-list

    God we love a DIY aesthetic. Though that very indie-pop sensibility of all hands on deck, be it writing sweet ditties, sending little tapes off to niche radio stations or hand-printing album artwork may now seem slightly antiquated, we find it as charming as ever. That’s why we were so keen to have a natter with indie three-piece The Wave Pictures. The band formed in 1998 in Leicestershire, and comprises drummer Jonny Helm, frontman David Tattersall and bass-wielder Franic Rozycki. Franic and David design the artwork for the band’s releases themselves, bless ’em, so we had a chat with David about his creative process, the joy of analogue and what makes a great sleeve design.

  29. Here2014-small-5513-list

    Our fourth annual Here symposium takes place in the summer and in the run-up to the event we’ll be looking at some of the stellar speakers who’ve graced the stage in previous years. Here is all about insight and inspiration, through accessible and enlightening talks from an international array of artists and designers, from big names to cutting-edge practitioners. Over the next few weeks the It’s Nice That team will be flagging up some of their favourite talks from the past three years, and next up is James Cartwright singing the praises of Penny Martin…

  30. Stockfish-ident-4-int_copy

    Icelandic graphic designer Einar Guòmundsson has collaborated with Guillermo Vázquez Bustelo on the identity for this year’s Stockfish Film Festival. This is the festival’s first iteration with the Stockfish name and the identity is fittingly bright, fun and abstract for its inaugural year. The illustrations represent ideas relating to Reykjavik and the film industry; camera elements, film reel and fish skin to name but a few. They are abstracted into patterns and fit together to form a sort of flag and a visual language for the festival.

  31. Design-by-st-fish-packaging-int-list

    There’s been no shortage of good fish-related design floating about recently: first, we had this identity for Korshags by Kurppa Hosk, and now we bring you this very cool proposal for sustainable fish packing by east London agency S-T. The designs were created as part of ICON magazine’s feature “rethink,” which asked creatives to come up with a new concept for anything they felt could be improved.

  32. Avblp-ally-capellino-inty-list

    Fashion photographer Agnes Lloyd-Platt’s new lookbook for Ally Capellino’s SS15 campaign is an ode to bathroom dye jobs and co-ordinating your hair with your outfit colour at all times. She paired models with candy-coloured hair in all the best shades – peach, silvery grey, cobalt blue, and mint green – with accessories in corresponding colours.