Author Archive: Rebecca Fulleylove

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Rebecca joined us as an editorial intern after studying at Norwich University College of the Arts. She originally wrote for the site between March and June 2012 and returned in the summer of 2014 for a four-week freelance stint.

@BeccyFulleylove

181 articles
  1. List

    Rarely the most exiting thing you’ll ever be given, the pamphlet has built a bad rep for itself – even the name has an underwhelming ring. But you haven’t seen these bad boys designed by Hey, a studio based in Barcelona that’s definitely more than a casual greeting.

  2. Things-list

    The sun casts a mysterious shadow on this week’s Things as colour-wise it’s not so much a tropical parrot, more a curious magpie. Fear not though because Things has become the lens to a wonderful, insightful camera with visuals reigning supreme and text taking a mini-break – it’s far too hot to actually read anyway. We’ve got photography, a lovely print, a compact little zine and even a map of our fine capital, so point and click at this beautiful array of Things. And if your eyes have had enough, give your ears a treat by downloading the third Studio Audience podcast.

  3. List

    The Olympics is only a few months away and you can already feel the growing testiness from commuters, their rush hour veins pulsing with dread and fear. With the ensuing craziness hitting the capital, an influx of promotional material and olympic tributes are sure to engulf us. So to remind us how this kind of design can be done (to perfection) is Otl Aicher; pioneer of graphic design during the 20th Century and creator of the visual identity for the 1972 Munich Olympics – which, luckily for us, has been collated by seemingly anonymous gatherers.

  4. List

    Black and white is still cool; as much as yellow is happy, blue is chilled out and purple? Well purple’s up for anything. This classic pairing still does it for me, even more so in photographs. But what about paintings that look like black and white photographs I hear you ask? I like them too, having been convinced by David Lyle’s excellent reproductions of old photographs with a twist of modern playfulness popped in there.

  5. Listy

    Girls just wanna have fun right? Well apparently furniture designers want the same, or at least Dutch designer Lucas Maasen does. He has a range of projects that flirt with the boundaries of the way we perceive objects, playing with how they’re presented to us or the way they’re created – he personifies the beloved if overused phrase, “thinking outside the box.”

  6. List2

    Embroidery is pretty hot right now. Knitting is in knots and crochet is unravelling at how cool embroidery’s gotten. But wait, it’s just got a little bit slicker with the help of Sydney-based, twin sister studio Maricor/Maricar who have taken their embroidery skills and applied it to the equally glamorous world of typography to create wonderfully textured works of bright, swooping letters and even some pattern work too. There’s more than just needlework going on here though with real considered design and composition making it all the more impressive.

  7. 3

    We admire anyone who can actually make things but it gets more interesting when these inventions do something even cleverer than make our lives easier, like using external elements around us and employing them into the process. Take Mischer’Traxler, a Vienna-based studio made up of Katharina Mischer and Thomas Traxler who develop and design products, furniture and installations (among other things) that push concepts and innovative thinking to the limit. As a result their projects are experimental, with an emphasis on the physical process and combine both craft and technology together in the wonderfully simple but refined mix.

  8. List

    David Benjamin Sherry’s photographs from his new project Astral first remind me of Rainbow Dust, the hideously delicious sour sugar crystals that came in a long tube mixed with Solero lollies. More beautiful of course, he’s created colourful, monochromatic topographical landscapes that crumble in a spectrum of rocky fluorescents.

  9. List

    When big disasters happen not only in far-flung climes but closer to home too, it bridges the distance that’s often been felt when we think of people from other cultures. This is exactly what Gideon Mendel’s photographs do in his series Drowning World which are currently showing at Somerset House.

  10. List

    Paper-cutting gets a lot of attention these days but it’s Bianca Chang’s work isthe first in a long time to actually make me say “oooh.” Uniform, slick and crisp white, she plays with shadows and letterforms in a beautifully striking way by somehow creating contrasts out of nothing more than changing how the paper is cut. Like a warm knife slicing cleanly through a vanilla cheesecake (only a lot more sophisticated), these paper sculptures are elegant and wonderful. It’s the small details in her work that really demonstrate her skill as well with a hoard of precise layers and smooth lines.

  11. Listit_snicethat_graduates_listings2

    With only a week left to submit to The Graduates 2012 feature, we thought it might be good to give you the lowdown on the graduate shows happening across the UK this summer. We can almost smell the white emulsion, sticky fixers and sweaty brows quivering in anticipation so make sure check out the exciting work these bright young things have getting up to. Also, if you’d like to submit an undergraduate show for inclusion please send the name of your university, name of the exhibition, dates and location, as well as any relevant links (including Twitter and Facebook), to thegraduates@itsnicethat.com, using the term “listings” in the subject title.

  12. List

    I’ve found the taste of avocado a difficult one to master. The weird fatty fruit with buttery, soap-like texture forms a strange the consistency in my mouth that I’m not sure I’m okay with, yet I find myself always returning for more. It’s an intriguing, exotic and odd thing that I want to be a part of, so I think deep down I have a love for the avocado – it just isn’t a conventional one.

  13. List

    In the morning if I’m having toast, I pop the bread in the toaster and then race to get the plate, knife, butter plus other topping of choice and arrange them beautifully next to the toaster. There is absolutely no point in me doing this, not at such speed anyway – but I continue to do so. This is sort of how I feel about hyperreal painting. It’s a strange notion to want to reproduce things we see everyday in 2D form but in immaculate detail because really there’s no real reason.

  14. Magnum

    The word ‘magnum’ is such a loaded and powerful word, I think it’s even been used as a team name in The Apprentice (UK version) although to less impressive effect. The word is also synonymous (partly because it uses it in its name) with Magnum the photographic agency that’s a world famous heavyweight in the biz and has been since 1947.

  15. Things-list

    Things is unintentionally feeling a bit British this week, acting like a tall glass of Pimm’s on a sunny afternoon. We’ve got the new issue of Granta giving it that infamous reddish tea stain colour, an illustrator providing the sprig of mint, and two creative newspapers giving that spicy gin-based zing. And not forgetting an exotic appearance from a Brazillian studio that becomes the juicy, tropical fruits that dress our heavenly cocktail of innovative imagination. So come on, it’s time to put down that milky cup of tea and take a big (responsible) swig of delicious Things!

  16. List

    There’s a regulated format for a lot of things in life where there’s little room to experiment. For instance ties go around your neck, not on your head, queueing is the only way to get anywhere and a five-day weekend with a two-day work week will never catch on. The same goes for most gig/music posters, many of which are formulaic and literally just the communication of information to a lot of people. But Minneapolis-based Landland (the studio so nice, they named it twice), have been cranking some great looking gig posters for various artists and bands with a signature style that I can’t help be fond of. With a line drawn style and nostalgic colours, their work feels really homegrown and with definite personality and clear care for what they’re actually creating.

  17. List

    When you’re younger you never want to be called “weird,” you want to blend in, laughing at the right jokes, talking about the right TV shows and liking very ordinary things. Now we’ve left our uniform, Nokia 3210 days behind us, the weird and the wonderful couldn’t be more encouraged. Normal is out man so bring on the madness.

  18. List

    Like a moth to a rainbow flame, I’m drawn to anything brightly coloured. I only flirt with colour though, compliment it, give furtive glances, have gentle brushes with it, because I’m not ready to fully commit to a colour-drenched life. As a result my day-to-day life remains fairly grey and beige.

  19. Lissst

    Tribal and robotic, are rarely two words that go hand-in-hand but somehow illustrator Raymond Lemstra manages to succeed in fusing the traditional with the futuristic in his mask and character designs. Soft, dulled colours blend with rounded squares and fine angles, these illustrations are subtle and steer clear of becoming paraodies of tiki wood carvings or totem poles rather they breathe new life into them. Throughout his work there’s a real sense of personality to each of his designs even when it’s a completely symmetrical, unmoving mask. It’s the detail and composition that enables Raymond to give them quirks and character, strengthening his pieces and making you dig that line work even more.

  20. List

    Trucks are great, but they can be awfully clunky and ungraceful. If only someone were to completely alter their structure and make them delicate works of art… Oh wait, Belgian artist Wim Delvoye has done just that and completely blown my mind in the process.

  21. Cannes-list

    The Cannes Film Festival seems like the most glamorous event on the film calendar – you pretty much have to be either super-cool or super-rich to go, and as I am neither (yet) I instead try to recreate the feeling of being there at home. I tan-up, wear white (for some riviera chic) and surround myself with popcorn and croissants (gotta keep it French) while re-watching the trailers again and again. The novelty wears off after about nine and a half minutes, because I’m in my living room not the south of France but still.

  22. List

    Now, there are some publications that can’t be whimsical in their copy, they must stick to the facts and be rationally straightforward. I’m talking about the science, financial and business magazine guys who have to communicate ideas in an orderly fashion so as not to end up making things up. Once in a while though they like to jazz those articles up a bit with some fun illustrations and here I usher in the work of Mitch Blunt who’s done a lot of this type of work for clients such as Bloomsburg Businessweek, Modus Magazine and FT Weekend as well as whole host of other publications both the factual and culturally creative.

  23. List

    When something looks like it’s been done on a computer but it’s actually been created by hand I’m instantly impressed and it’s even better when that work is actually really good (rather than just those weird painted replicas of Johnny Depp or David Beckham you see on the market sometimes).

  24. List

    If someone were to illustrate my life – and yes, someone may ask one day – then I’d want it to be done by Justin Mezzell who’s made me swoon with his nifty (but cool) illustrations. Creating numerous posters, infographics, and an array of editorial work his portfolio is a brilliant example of getting things right. The retro feel combined with grainy textures and warm colours come together in a melting pot of creative cheese fondue that I just want to dip my tiny fork into. Forget the celery and chunks of mystery meat I just want illustrative gruyère!

  25. Comet

    It’s hard isn’t it, when you’re having one of those days where you feel like you can’t do anything right and even though you’re surrounded by a sea of charismatic commuters you still can’t help but feel alone… And then you hear a song or something on TV and it makes you cry because it’s like, “ugh this is sooo my life!” No? Well even if you’re not having one of those days today you’ll still be able to identify with this sweet animation from George Shelbourn called Comet that tells the tale of a lost little comet, stuck on a strange planet and unable to fly away.

  26. List

    Generally I’ve always been a girly girl. I went through the tomboy phase of fluorescent Kappa popper joggers, but who didn’t really? One of my favourite places as a child was the aisle in Toys R Us where all the dolls, Barbies, Sindys, My Little Ponies and anything else ‘for girls’ sat there gleaming in all that glossy pink and purple packaging. It used to make me so happy, which is perhaps why I find myself smiling at the work of Spanish graphic designer Marta Cerda Alimbau, whose work is an array of well-executed, lovely looking design with a palette of proud lavenders and punchy magentas with sprinklings of pastels and green hues that can’t help but transport me back to that aisle.

  27. List

    Hanging clothes up is something I’m fairly bad at remembering to do. I try things on and in my excitement for the next item, my grip automatically loosens and the piece of clothing drops to the floor as I reach for another. It’s a bad habit but perhaps I’d be more encouraged to tidily hang things if my garments could look as beautiful as Hanna Sandin’s suspended installations of everyday objects.

  28. List

    Reading cereal packets used to be part of my morning ritual as a child and learning how to say ‘riboflavin’ was a definite landmark. But it wasn’t just the riveting vitamin content that I loved staring at, it was also the repeated ‘serving suggestion’ image and layout.

  29. List

    It sounds silly, but sometimes it’s too easy to forget or dismiss the work that goes into the visual elements of what we’re presented with everyday in various publications and books. But an excellent illustration is like a brilliant side-dish, enhancing the experience of the main course (text) and contributing to the overall effect, sometimes even rescuing the (metaphorical) meal.

    The V&A Illustration Awards help remind us of the incredible illustrations of the past 12 months and this year’s shortlist has just been announced. Recognising the potato dauphinoises of the illustration world, 14 artists have been chosen from over 1,000 submissions from UK illustrators. The awards have been categorised under Book Illustration, Book Cover and Jacket Illustration and Editorial publications, with a fourth category for Student work being judged by the winners of last year’s award. The winners will be announced on 11 June, and the shortlist is a gentle nod to all the beautiful work that’s been produced over the past year.

  30. Dom15

    It’s a bittersweet experience to come across a an artist whose work you love, only to find out that the work you have seen is their last. So it is with the works of Domenico Gnoli, a brilliant Italian-born, New York-based painter of the 1960s who sadly passed away at the young age of 36. And it really is a shame because his works are simply stunning. Up until recently his paintings have been kept hidden away in private collections, however now at the Luxembourg & Dayan gallery in New York rare works from 1964-1969 are being shown to their full beauty.

  31. Things-list

    Things is giddy because it’s the weekend so Things is feeling very playful indeed. It’s running madly through a field with a kite of dreams and tripping over long grasses of creativity along the way. Lighthearted, colourful publications, cheeky cards and even a children’s book are Things’ playmates this week and they’re all ready to get you in a footloose and fancy-free mood. And look, Things has just tagged you “It” so get chasing (reading), they’re waiting!

  32. List

    I wish I was the type of person who handled multitasking well. Don’t get me wrong I’ll do everything I’m supposed to do but it will be completed with a crumpled brow, frazzled hair and a lingering sense of panic. A cool approach is what’s needed – that or eight arms.

  33. Nb

    Squashing your face against a window or glass has always been a hilarious snippet of comedy gold (and an excellent ice-breaker) but in photography it isn’t always done as smoothly as it should be. Crass photocopier jobbys, with tight crops of faces (or worse boobs and butts) just doesn’t cut it for me. So I welcome Neil Bedford’s series of images (styled by Simon Mann) for clothing label Neighborhood’s latest lookbook, recently featured in Inventory Magazine.

  34. List

    When making a salad I often become greedy over the choice of ingredients on offer. The multitude of leaves, the bounty of fruit and veg (with the option of meat too) and don’t even get me started on dressings. The problem is I pile everything into a bowl and it’s a clash of tastes and colours ruining my healthy choice. While this clearly doesn’t work with food, there is a skill in doing it in artwork.

  35. List

    While we can get overawed by the wealth of established talent in the creative industries, it’s important to support those who are either just starting out or still climbing that competitive tree of success. Like flowers they need watering, feeding but above all nurturing to continue becoming the best flowers (creative professionals) they can. This is why the Design Museum’s annual Designers in Residence programme is such an excellent opportunity in recognising new and emerging talent.

  36. Jem-goulding

    It’s never encouraged to objectify people. It’s degrading, it’s sexist (normally) and we forget about the important things in life like personality and good manners. But with Jem Goulding’s photographs of beautiful men, I can’t help but stare and linger. It’s shameful yes, but Jem’s photographs are genuinely very good images.

  37. Dan-hillier

    I remember one time when my nan showed me a load of old family photos and I mean really old, as in before the days when “Say cheese!” was even uttered. Everyone had the same glacial expressions with eyes that managed to follow you wherever you stood. It was creepy but these photos still physically exist so watch out.

  38. List

    To actually peer inside someone else’s subconscious would be a wonderful thing. Obviously you’d have to be careful to not become mentally scarred by what you saw but on the whole it would be fascinating. I feel like I’m doing that with Jaime Brett Treadwell’s paintings. Surreal, chock full of detail with groovy colours too, it’s like being enveloped by a carousel of psychedelic merriment –which is no bad thing.

  39. List

    Now I don’t often use this phrase, but Stefan Glerum’s illustrations are “the bomb.” That’s right, the bomb. Featured back in 2010, he’s so good we had to revisit his site and see what he’s been up to since, and we weren’t disappointed with everything being a little more slick and even better than we remembered.

  40. List

    We all know that the happiest place on earth is supposed to be Disneyland. Who knows whether this can actually be measured but it’s definitely a place where an obscene amount of money is spent, tempers are shredded and adults wander around in garish costumes, damp from the drool of children’s sugar and schmaltz comas. What’s distressing about these kinds of ‘utopias’ is that replicas have been attempted. An example of this is captured in Catherine Hyland’s photographic series of the the abandoned theme park, Wonderland in China that remains half finished and deserted.

    First started in 1998 with the intention of creating the biggest theme park in Asia set to cover 120 acres, building stopped when agreements over land ownerships could not be met and funding was cut. The half-built structures across vacant cornfields serve as a reminder of what could’ve been, creating this ghostly, fairy-tale world. Catherine’s images which can be seen at new gallery Flat C later this month, are so brilliantly jarring with the artificial turrets and towers against the dusty, concreted reality of where it actually is.