Photography Archive

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    Fate dealt us a good hand a few weeks back, while we were searching for a portrait of Raymond Briggs to accompany an interview we did with him in the latest Printed Pages. The best one we found, one that summed up the temperament of Raymond effortlessly, was by a photographer called Toby Glanville. A quick look at his site confirmed that Toby was a very, very good photographer, with a strong body of work that seems to hold a style, a smell, and a vibe. Toby kindly allowed us to use his portrait of Raymond for the magazine, and to find out a little bit more about his exquisite photography, we asked him a few questions. Here he is on the art a good portrait, his top three photographers and that day he spent with Raymond…

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    There are coffee table books, and then there are huge, fantastic publications so weighty that they’re likely to shunt your table a couple of inches closer to the floor, as in the case of this staggering beauty by TASCHEN. The Rolling Stones is a 518-page testament to the incredible wealth of photographs that have been taken of the iconic band over the course of their 50 year career, and it’s breathtaking.

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    I occasionally forget how incredibly dependent I am on photojournalism to provide a context to articles I’m reading, especially when said articles deal with ideas formulated by experts who’ve spent decades researching subjects I can barely even pronounce. Producing this photographic re-contextualisation is kind of Alexi Hobbs’ job, when he’s commissioned by media giants like Monocle and TIME to provide imagery that explains their articles. And fortunately for them and us alike, he’s very very good at it.

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    The seventh issue of the spectacular online photography journal Accent Magazine is here. Pieced together by Lydia Garnett and Lucy Nurnberg, the pair source some of the best young photographers working today and accept submissions of image-based stories from each one to collate into a temporary online space. This issue is truly spellbinding: the stories are even more poignant, the photography is even more crisp and jaw dropping. Personally I find that it can be hard to concentrate on reading a whole printed magazine in one go, but something about this corner of the internet allows me to get stuck in immediately and devour it. Well worth a good half an hour of your time if you can give it. A huge congrats to Lucy and Lydia, again!

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    Driving around Johannesburg early in the mornings, photographer Marc Shoul was puzzled by the number of domestic workers he saw out walking their employers’ dogs. “The complexion of servitude is pretty obvious in the city, even as things change,” he explains. “When I see domestic workers, some in uniform, walking their owners’ dogs, it is hard not to reflect on how unaffected the rituals of suburban affluence are during this period of seismic urban change.”

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    There’s always something a little strange about parades. For us, they ignite a confused sort of excitement and delight in the voyeurism of looking on at others united for a cause, never entirely certain what’s going on, never totally engaged with the pageantry and accoutrements and singularity of the gathered crowd’s purpose. This sense is captured perfectly in Holly Falconer’s stunning photographic series Parade, in which she documents a little-known celebration called the Neston Ladies Day parade. The annual march sees women and girls take to the streets of the Cheshire town on the first Thursday of June, in a procession featuring a banner bearing the phrase: “Bear Ye One Another’s Burdens.”

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    Despite the decriminalisation of homosexuality in Russia in 1993, current president Vladimir Putin’s apparent determination to pass laws which oppress gay rights and stigmatise the LGBT community seem to exert a pressure on gay people there that feels a long way away from the comparatively liberal UK. Which is partly why, in the run up to the Sochi Olympics, photographer Isabella Moore undertook a project in which she traveled across Russia photographing those who felt these effect of these laws most intensely. The photographs are intimate and touching; taken in the subjects’ homes and capturing moments of tender affection, they hammer home the frightening reality of movements of oppression, and the important role of photographic journalism in making people aware of it.

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    Alexander Coggin’s photographs remind me of those scenes in sci-fi films when you see everything from the perspective of an extra-terrestrial who’s just landed on Earth for the first time. A master of the white balance, he somehow manages to cast a coolly detached, slightly surreal light over the everyday domestic scenes that pervade his portfolio, making everything from a green marble sink to a tray of readymade hors d’oeuvres seem completely new and slightly out of touch. He’s just updated his website with loads of new work which proves my point adeptly. See more from him here.

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    Whenever we’ve featured Nick Ballon on the site in the past, we’ve tended to focus on his self-initiated projects such as his terrific study of a Bolivian airline or his work in the weird world of wrestling. However Nick is also a super-talented editorial photographer and his portraits for the likes of the The Sunday Times and The Guardian’s weekend supplements are well worth exploring.

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    Judging by the photographs she was commissioned to take for Bloomberg Businessweek, Stephanie Gonot and American radio show host Jesse Thorn were a seriously good match. She was commissioned by the publishing giants to photograph Bullseye founder Jesse, and where many would have fallen into that chic, perfectly polished and occasionally dull trap that portrait photographers so often have to skirt around, she succeeded in steering well clear and opted to capture him larking about instead; gesticulating wildly in his office, sitting in a giant banana (?) and photographing the view from his desk.

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    Grant Cornett is an effing (no swearing here, thank you) good photographer. Really EFFING good. The Brooklyn-based image-maker has been plying his trade in New York for just over a decade, creating work that’s incredibly broad. Within his vast portfolio lives immaculate food photography, still-life fashion shoots, a plethora of punchy magazine covers and some stellar portraiture. It’s too much to hope to encapsulate in a single post so for the meantime feast your eyes on these portraits of faces – some famous, some not so – all given the Grant Cornett treatment and exquisitely immortalised.

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    You know when you go on holiday and you’re so keen to make the most of every view that you walk around with your iPhone glued to your hand? That, in essence, is the subject of this brilliant series by Catherine Hyland, who was last on the site when she photographed a dilapidated theme park in China back in 2012. It is slightly more complicated than that however, as she explains; the series looks to draw attention to the “cultural concepts of landscape deeply embedded in the development of contemporary leisure sites.”

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    Edmund Clark is one of the most interesting artists working today, exploring what is arguably the defining issue of the past 13 years. He’s interested in the wars waged by the USA and UK in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the fall-out from this foreign policy and how it impacts on us here at home. His new book The Mountains of Majeed continues this theme, as it’s a reflection on “the end of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan through photography, found imagery and Taliban poetry.”

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    When those from the music world travel into the art world, their journeys can result in somewhat mixed creative results. Some musicians, like Ronnie Wood, move into rather grotesque paintings, while Dean Blunt regularly fills Hackney’s Space gallery with baffling images (like these strange Evisu jeans emblem-based works) and The Specials bassist Horace Panter likes painting robots. As such, we find some of the outcomes of this tricky transition are perhaps less accomplished than others – a mixtape you listen to with one finger firmly on the “skip” button, if you will.

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    Tom Johnson strikes me as a photographer who captures the people and the places around him as they actually are, not as he would like them to look so as to fit simply and stylishly into his portfolio. His work spans portraiture and documentary photography – he once bought a 1980s motorhome and travelled up and down the UK photographing the people he came across – and touches distant edges of the population, from female bodybuilders and transvestites to a clan of Peckham’s sapeurs. He’s currently looking to merge the three areas of his practice into one, with new commissions for The New British and VICE pushing him to new territory and to photograph evermore fascinating characters.

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    “Eventually everything connects – people, ideas, objects..the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.” Charles Eames’ quotation opens this impressive book designed by Annahita Kamali and Florian Böhm for Vitra, an (almost) entirely visual celebration of the legendary designer though an intriguing selection of images. It’s a curious publication but one that really works, with each image connecting to the next in sometimes extremely subtle ways. As Eckhart Nickel writes in the book’s introductory essay: “We are transported by little, precious elements in every image that correspond to a detail in the next one, creating a kind of hide-and-seek for the traces that design leaves in our life and the ones life leaves in design.”

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    We had the pleasure of meeting up with photographer Adrià Cañameras in Barcelona at the beginning of the year, when he was excitedly telling us about a collection of photographs entitled Anna et Salomé that he was hoping to publish in book form. Now, almost four seasons down the line, the book has just been published by Lawson’s Books and we can confirm that it’s as much of a treat as we’d anticipated. Collating a selection of images taken by Adrià at different places around the Mediterranean, the book makes reference to his French and Spanish heritage in the form of a serene, considered ode to the summer. With commissions under his belt for Apartamento, Dazed Magazine and the New York Times already, Anna et Salomé is a calm counterpart to much of Adriàs portfolio. We’re looking forward to seeing what he does next.

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    As people who produce our own magazine, the hunt for great regular features is a constant one. So when we come across a belter in someone else’s publication, our admiration is spiked with a little envy. That’s how I felt when I saw the new Christie’s magazine (edited by Jeremy Langmead and designed by B.A.M. London) and came across the beautifully simple Collectors & Collections series.

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    Texan artist Mark Lovejoy produces work that’s a bit of of a head scratcher. What at first looks like a complex digital render could also just be photographs of thickly-painted palettes. In fact Mark’s images are a hybrid of both; myriad individual photographs of paints, pigments waxes and resins, shot and reshot, manipulated and then retouched some more until the surface textures take a pleasing aesthetic form, but retain their ambiguous genesis.

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    We just can’t get enough of well-executed GIFs here at It’s Nice That at the moment, so we were rather chuffed when today’s grey morning was brightened up with these stunning moving images from photographer Chris O’Donovan.

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    The confined chaos within Astrid Korntheuer’s images hits you instantly, as though the vibrant disorder is actively trying to push its way through the edges of the photograph. The series titled Natures Morte (Still Life), was conceived by photographing 25 square metre installations the German photographer made herself using various materials to create a man-made forest of jumble.

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    It’s generally accepted that society gets the celebrities it deserves, that fame doesn’t just happen and we have to understand why certain people get put on a pedestal. Nowhere is this more interesting than in the case of Ron Jeremy, the world’s most recognisable porn star. Recently Ron went to Sydney to promote a new rum that bears his name, and filmmakers Ingvar Kenne and Cameron Gray were given full access to him for 48 hours, travelling in his stretched Hummer to various parties whose organisers had applied on Facebook to have him turn up.

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    Harley Weir is an extraordinary talent. Her work is bold and unreserved, whether it be part of a personal project investigating the border between Israel and Palestine, a vibrant fashion editorial for the likes of British Vogue, or a series of ethereal portraits capturing redheads with all of the eerie stillness of Millais’ Ophelia.

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    Annabel Miedema describes her series Acting Future as “an experimental journey with my family,” and the word experimental is certainly apt. The series sees Annabel, a young Netherlands-based photographer, reimagine what the future might look like if time were to collapse, and the cultural behaviours of the 1960s and 70s to become au fait again.

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    French photographer Paul Rousteau sounds like a nice chap – one with a bright outlook on life reflected in the bold pops of colour he adorns his editorial work with. “Being cynical is too easy because everyone has a lack of something”, he told Art Book Guy. “So I try to see the beautiful things in people, even if it’s a bit naive or even in a cynical way.”

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    I have to confess that the name 02gb didn’t ring any bells for me, but it turns out the photographic duo, which is made up of Max von Gumppenberg and Patrick Bienert, is a pretty big fish on the German fashion scene. Looking through their portfolio this comes as no surprise; they’ve worked for the likes of Hussein Chalayan, Kostas Murkudis, and shot numerous times for Vogue. It’s their lookbook for couture master Valentino that we were seduced by however.

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    Ever wondered what happens when you die? Do our souls live on in heaven, frolicking about with those of our lost loved ones? Is there a dark, black nothingness? Or do we get stuffed to the eyeballs with gems and a big shiny crown thrust on our heads until we’re all trussed up like a little skeleton Liberace?

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    These photographs in the latest issue of the ultra-slick men’s fashion mag, Arena Homme+, are so incredibly perfect, never have I felt so giddy at the combination of slouched, neutral knitwear and ambiguous, colourful props.

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    With a portfolio bursting with fashion, editorial and portrait photography, it’s no surprise Tung Walsh’s client list is constantly growing having shot for big-wigs including A.P.C, Dolce and Gabbana, BON and W magazine among others. Capturing a mixture of models and famous folk, his style is cool, edgy and setting the standard in achieving that originality and freshness many photographers can only imitate.

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    Statues are an eternal recognition of a person or event’s impact on society – once erected they become a symbol and a part of the community forever. What interests photographer Fabrice Fouillet is when these effigies are on a monumental scale and take over towns, becoming just as exceptional at the political or religious power they’re representing.

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    When these flaming barrels rolled into our consciousness, we were instantly intrigued. While it’s nothing new to see photographic documentation of strange customs and traditions (James Pearson-Howes, for instance, has captured British Folk traditions to brilliant effect), these images by Conor Beary are no less fascinating. The photographs document a 200-year-old tradition in the wonderfully-named village of Ottery Saint Mary in Devon, which sees the streets filled with fire and wild enthusiasm.

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    There’s a real appetite here on the internet for old black and white photos being presented in colour, but in the main they tend to focus on historic or social themes. It’s less common to see sports photography undergoing this treatment, which is why we were so struck by the work of Gooner Frog when we came across it on Facebook.

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    It’s hard to tell at what point Julian Faulhaber’s images are captured; if he’s the first person on site after the completion of a new modernist structure or whether he employs the skills of some exceptionally talented retouchers to clean up all the human detritus that clutters the purity of manmade structures. Either way his images evoke a sense of futuristic newness; of ultra-sleek new buildings awaiting their human occupants. They pay homage to the craft of architecture, celebrate the artistry of interiors and simultaneously poke fun at the absurdity of our aesthetic tastes – seriously, who thought purple, yellow and green stripes was a good idea? They’re also exceptionally visually arresting, so gawp on at the work of this talented chap.

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    Nick Turpin succinctly captures some of Londoners’ least comfortable moments – cooped up in the hot breath and bad smells of a sweltering bus in winter. It’s sticky, it’s awful, and time seems to stop still as the wheels crawl wheezily along. The beauty of Nick Turpin’s work is that it almost makes you forget all that, instead turning these seemingly endless minutes into painterly portraits of Londoners at their most bored, tired and exasperated.

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    It’s one thing slapping a Valencia Instagram filter on a photo of your roast dinner and mentally patting yourself on the back for your old school photography skills, but it’s quite another to have your subjects dressed up like they’ve just been zapped in from another era and then photograph them to an extremely high standard accordingly. Photographer Robbie Augspurger describes the motivation behind his practice thus – “I like to think of what I wished existed, and then make it” – which is very admirable, really. Especially as what he wishes existed is a series of glamorous headshots so decidedly retro in both styling and format that you wouldn’t think twice if you found them in an old shoebox in your loft.

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    Kids are weird. Granted I say this as a 30-year-old man with no children, no nieces and nephews and no godchildren, but in the limited dealings I have had with babies and toddlers and whatever you call those ones that are older than toddlers, they are all pretty bizarre. Artist and longtime friend of the site Lenka Clayton has confirmed my suspicions with her project called 63 Objects Taken From My Son’s Mouth..

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    No one photographs teenagers like Jamie Hawkesworth. For years we’ve been posting about his ability to capture the infinitely curious in-between stage of adolescence, and quietly knowing that he’s the guy who’s currently got the monopoly on this topic. Recently though, alongside shooting youngsters for mags such as AnOther and The New York Times Style, Jamie’s has been lending his skills to some corporate magazines and brands – a far cry from his time roaming the bus shelters of northern England or the Whitby Goth Festival. This year Jamie was approached by Lexus’ magazine Beyond to follow two chocolatiers on a journey into deepest Vietnam on the hunt for a rare cacao bean. Slight change of scenery.

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    When darkness falls, the beach is usually reserved for inebriated frolics and skinnydipping, but photographer Marco Andres Arguello gives our twilight coastlines a new context with his series, Tungsten Beach. Marco focuses on the lifeguard stands and other structures that litter the sandy shores of South Beach in Miami, Florida but timed his photographs to coincide with Urban Beach Week, a hip­hop event notorious for wild parties and mischief. As a precaution, local police have started to set up tungsten floodlights around these structures for security during the event.

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    Frank Bauer is a portrait photographer in the truest sense of the word, in that he is exceptionally, almost astoundingly good at photographing people. His skill has won him commissions photographing some of the most famous faces in modern pop culture, from Miranda July, Steve McQueen and Jane Goodall to Iggy Pop, Grayson Perry and Ai Weiwei. With each of his subjects he captures some new, as yet unseen angle, offering his viewers a novel glimpse into their untold stories; whether that be artist and director Steve McQueen trying to suppress a yawn, or primate expert Jane Goodall gazing hopefully into the distance, her features softening to the point of making her seem childlike.

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    The city being a lonely place is a constant source of inspiration to young creatives, sometimes to the point at which I think if I hear one more person refer to London or New York as a “concrete jungle” I’ll punch them in the face. In amongst the enormous swamp of projects that deal with this subject matter, there are some rare, beautiful orchids. Isolated by Fernando Vallejo is one of these. Fernando’s been prowling the streets of The Big Apple for a while now, snapping passers-by as they rush around the city like ants late for jury duty.