Photography Archive

  1. Conor-beary-swan-upping-its-nice-thatlist

    Conor’s a man of tradition, albeit those very strange, very British traditions that so many photographers find irresistible. The last time we featured his work, he had been catching up with the good people of the brilliantly named West Country town of Ottery St Mary, who have a penchant for setting fire to barrels full of tar. Now, he’s turned his attention to the less pyrotechnic but just as odd tradition of Swan Upping, the ceremony of checking and counting the Queen’s swans along the Thames. As many are aware, not only can swans break a man’s arm simply by looking at it (unverified), they are also all the property of the Queen.

  2. Julie-hascoet-itsnicethat-list

    Made lunch plans for today? I’d cancel them, if I were you, and instead dedicate an hour at midday to perusing the brand new issue of Accent Magazine. A biannual photography journal compiled by Lydia Garnett and Lucy Nurnberg, issue #9 of Accent Magazine showcases Julie Hascoët’s series Battre la Campagne – a collection images documenting the free-party movement which began almost 30 years ago, and which “was spearheaded by British music collective Spiral Tribe,” Julie explains. “In the early 90s, the culture grew steadily from its birthplace in southern England to Europe and North America, attracting travellers, nomads and free spirits along from all around the world.

  3. Karine_laval_the_pool_int_list

    There’s nothing quite like the first dip of summer in an outdoor swimming pool with the undulating waves lapping against your shins as you sit anchored to the tiled side. Capturing this shared experience is French photographer Karine Laval with her series The Pool, taken at swimming pools throughout Europe. The initial draw for Karine was the idea that swimming pools and beach resorts are a combination of the natural and the artificial: “They represent a dominant theme of modern life in our culture and mix the natural element of water with the culture and social element of a manmade environment,” she explains.

  4. Burning_man_int_list

    For one week every year, Nevada’s windswept Black Rock Desert is descended upon by over 65,000 revellers for Burning Man festival. Something of a massive social experiment, the festival built around ideas of community, art, gift-giving and what is called “radical self-reliance” takes its name from the ritualistic burning of a towering wooden effigy on the Saturday night. In its simplest incarnation, Burning Man is a seven-day desert rave where, blinded by dust and no doubt half-delirious from the sun, festival-goers erect a makeshift city for a surreal week of madness. But it is also host to a number of strange and fantastic happenings and site-specific installations and sculpture, including a mechanised fire-breathing octopus, lofty wooden temples standing 15 metres tall and the eponymous Man himself.

  5. Alina_negoita_int_list

    Alina Negoita has been commissioned by AnOther, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle and i-D, and one scroll through her website makes it clear why. Powerful black and white images of faces, movements and exchanges work together to create a captivating blend of fashion photography and documentary photography. “Although my background is in fashion photography – my goal is to subtly use a fashion approach in my work but with a much stronger sociopolitical impact drawn from human rights and subjects I am passionate about,” Alina explains.

  6. Vincent-chapters-int-list

    Vincent Chapters’ photographs are so firmly rooted in London life it’s almost hard to imagine his work in any other setting. A born and bred Londoner, Vincent’s casual pictures taken of friends soon turned into shooting anything and everything the city has to offer. Capturing both passers-by and friends, architecture and the medley of characters that make up some of the capital’s different scenes, he is carving out a niche with his particularly urbane style, and his fast-growing portfolio shows everything from rap battles to the eccentrics you might find on the underground.

  7. Pip-siam-int-list

    Pipatra Banpabutr has been photographing day-to-day life and street culture in his native Thailand for the last six years. Gripped by the way in which the country is being reshaped by western influence, the photographer has turned his fascination into a self-published personal project titled Siam So Chic. The vibrant series is mostly rooted in Bangkok but includes work shot all over the country, capturing feverish slices of metropolitan life in the tropics and pitting colourful street scenes against quieter moments at the barbershop or the zoo as old-world Thailand meets new.

  8. Jay-giampetro-itsnicethat-list

    Street photography has changed irrevocably from the days when photographers used to take to the streets clutching a small Leica camera, blacked out with gaffer tape, to steal shots of their unsuspecting subjects from the hip. These days iPhones have made everybody a photographer, which makes the ability to nail that shot – the one that captures the essence of a place and its inhabitants, all the more precious.

  9. Nan-goldin-4-int-list

    Last year Nan Goldin happened across a box of photographs taken in Boston in the early 70s when she was moving studios from the Bowery to Brooklyn. 50 of these images – which have remained largely unpublished until now – make up a new show at Guido Costa Projects in Turin. The exhibition looks back to Goldin’s Boston era as a turning point in her career, marking her first steps into the decade of work she coined The Ballad of Sexual Dependency.

  10. Kitty_crowther_017-jake-green-its-nice-that-list

    Jake Green is an old chum of the site, and recently we’ve been enamoured with his look at London’s Evangelical churches. But it’s the church of illustration he’s been bowing down to recently, and all our prayers have been answered in the form of The Bookmaker’s Studio. The sweet little tome brings together beautiful photographs shot inside the studios of children’s illustrators, and features text by another old chum of It’s Nice That, James Cartwright. “It’s not often you get the chance to go and hang out with some of your heroes, so the images we’ve created capture our excitement at being allowed into these otherwise unseen spaces to witness such a variety of personalities, styles and techniques,” says Jake.

  11. Thomas-prior-itsnicethat-list

    Never having actually met him, I picture Thomas Prior as a particularly light-footed kind of person, able to jump from shadow to shadow something like a superhero in a Marvel comic does to get his shot. Why? If you have a browse of his newest body of work, a collection of images snapped on his recent travels in Asia, you’ll see; he seems to inhabit the quiet spaces that most people wouldn’t rest their eyes on for more than a split second, capturing photographs of situations so fleeting you wonder how he spotted them at all.

  12. Madlen-hirtentreu-trash-bin-its-nice-that-list

    They say one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. For one Estonian photographer, trash isn’t just treasure, but a rich, and possibly stinky font of creative inspiration. Madlen Hirtentreu got in touch recently with a simple missive: “I usually capture images with [an] analog camera and lately started to photograph trash bins in the early mornings… have a look.” There’s not too much more to say about the project really, but have a look we did, and found something oddly compelling about these pictures of dustbins. Each overspilling vessel tells a story go what once was: the parties, the shared pizzas, the lunches grabbed on the go, the mop cast aside for a newer, shinier number. It’s rather poignant in a way, but rather comical too. Essentially though, it’s just pictures of bins, and there’s nothing really too wrong with that.

  13. We_want_more_itsnicethat_list

    The relationship between music and photography is a giddy and restless union, like a wild friendship where all the greatest adventures happen. The glamour, electricity and the emotion music photography can elicit is powerful and it’s why it resonates with so many of us. With the dawn of the digital age, the way we see these images has changed slightly and closed the gap between us and the stars we admire and it’s this progression that curator Diane Symth was keen to dissect when putting together We Want More: Image-making and music in the 21st Century, on now at The Photographers’ Gallery.

  14. Alexander-coggins-street-its-nice-that-list

    Alex Coggin’s no stranger to It’s Nice That, we’ve long been enamoured with his knack for casting a sci-fi light on domestic scenes and having very hot friends. Now, we’re celebrating his street photography, which demonstrates his skilled eye for finding the uncanny in the everyday, and for two women wearing matching all-over leopard print outfits. He manages to be there for those tiny moments that most would miss – the embarrassed little kid wishing he was somewhere else while his parents make a tourist spectacle of themselves, a woman’s turquoise trousers somehow making her seem part of a theme park’s architecture. The colours are great, the content bizarre and the execution coolly nonchalant, and we’re hooked.

  15. Maggie-shannon-itsnicethat-list

    “I’ve always loved the flower district, it’s a tiny oasis of green in Manhattan,” Maggie Shannon tells us. “I really loved that contrast of natural beauty in such a grey city. Like most of my other projects, I was curious to see what the whole process was and how it works, so I spent a couple days waking up at dawn and photographing the district and the people working in it.”

  16. Daniel-arnold-street-photography-its-nice-that-list

    On Sunday, Dalston’s Gillett Square was overrun with very excitable teenagers falling over one another for the chance to meet “YouTuber” Latoya Forever. Many commented on the strangeness of seeing people totally lose their shit Beatlemania style about someone famous simply for being on the internet. But YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and the like are indeed worthy platforms for talent, as image makers like the photographer Daniel Arnold prove. Our very own art director Jamie McIntyre describes himself as a big time Daniel “Instagram fanboy” and even the most cursory glance at the photographer’s site shows why. Daniel’s street photography may not be revolutionary in subject matter, but it’s so incredibly well done that it manages to stop you in your tracks and see almost through his eyes, such is the immediacy of the shots. Street photography may be ten a penny, but a photographer with such a knack for spotting that perfect shot and capturing it so well is a rarity. Daniel, you deserve every single one of those 108,000 followers.

  17. Martin_parr_nice_2015_int_list

    Since 1985 Martin Parr has been capturing the kitsch culture of seaside resort towns the world over. Starting with the tattered charm of New Brighton near Liverpool in his famous photo essay The Last Resort, the photographer’s anthropological take on beach culture has moved from Englands’s north-west coast to Italy, Spain, and as far as Peru and Argentina. A comprehensive travelling exhibition of his beach photography Life’s a Beach has been making international rounds and is currently on show at Le Théâtre de la Photographie et de l’Image in Nice.

  18. Warhol_underground_int_list

    From The Velvet Underground to the silver studio-cum-squat-palace that was the Factory, Andy Warhol’s reach extended far beyond painting and screenprints. So ingrained is he in the fabric of modern culture it is virtually impossible to escape his influence even today. A new exhibition at the Centre Pompidou-Metz in France explores his many collaborations and the relationship between music, dance and art in his unfading body of work.

  19. Bryan_sheffield_itsnicethat_list

    Photographer Bryan Sheffield’s portfolio is a glorious mix of music bigwigs, careful observations and elevating the everyday. Working professionally since 2006, Bryan first got interested in the field “by photographing friend’s bands, and bands that I was a fan of,” he explains. 

  20. Polly-brown-itsnicethat-list

    British designer Phoebe English is renowned for straddling the line which separates fine art and fashion – creating abstract, wearable pieces which would be equally welcome in a gallery setting, should a curator be that way inclined. These are the result of a lengthy investigation into her fabrics and materials and arduous construction. It’s long overdue, then, that she allow a photographer into her Hackney atelier to preserve a little of this for prying eyes in the outside world. Photographer Polly Brown is well suited to the task.

  21. Francesco-nazardo-itsnicethat-list-2

    It’s fascinating to see how photography veers from one trend to another, creating a varying zigzag-shaped trajectory in the process. In this case, photographer Francesco Nazardo has moved away from crowded landscapes and busy scenes, and his desire to clear out the clutter has led to him to start using very close crops – a pattern he saw beginning to emerge in his work around two years ago.

  22. Stephanie_vovas_int_list

    One look at Stephanie Vovas’ golden-hued photographs of 70s-inspired California bombshells is all you need you get a feel for her artful storytelling and style. The LA photographer has shot covers for Playboy and got behind the camera for a spate of evocative, self-initiated series, finding inspiration in Charlie’s Angels, the sexual revolution and the meticulous set design of shows like Mad Men, but California is the real star. “I grew up on the East Coast, and California is radically different. I love the Mid-Century Modern and 70s architecture here, the interior design, the plants and trees, and the effect sunshine has,” says Stephanie. “I treat my shoots as if we are making a movie.” That theatricality definitely translates.

  23. Nico-tokyo-fish-market-itsnicethat-list

    Nico Therin is one of a whole collection of photographers who I feel like I’m holidaying through vicariously this summer. He recently travelled to Tokyo, where he spent a morning photographing the famous Tsukiji fish market, having heard that it is soon to be moved out of central Tokyo. “It’s been around since 1935, and over 2,000 tons of fish are traded at Tsukiji daily, making it the biggest wholesale fish and seafood market in the world,” he told us. “Since the market occupies such valuable real estate in the heart of Tokyo, it’s set to be relocated in November 2016 to Toyosu, about a mile and a half away, making way for resort builders and casino operators who plan to build up the spot in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics.” His photographs document a secret world of bartering, chopping, and auctioning the fish that are later transported around the country in vibrant colour; you can almost hear the huge fish slapping against one another as they’re thrown into a skip full of ice, or smell the cold steel that’s used to slice them up.

  24. Klaus_frahm_4th_wall_int_list

    Watching the grace and effortless-seeming style of a play, it’s intriguing to consider the flurry and bustle that happens behind the dark red curtain. For the last few years, Hamburg-born photographer Klaus Frahm has been stripping back Europe’s stages to take incredible shots of theatres from the other side. His photographs reveal cascades of seats framed by the structures that house the lights and mechanics of the show. 

  25. Charlie-kwai-itsnicethat-list

    Forgive me a moment of philosophising, but all too often we walk through our lives with our eyes glued to Citymapper, or street signs, or the electronic noticeboard in the tube, and miss the eclectic, bizarre and utterly extraordinary collection of people we pass by on a daily basis. But in London at least, Charlie Kwai is on a one-man mission to capture the collection of people who disappear into the abyss, and in doing so he has built up a collection of snapshots documenting our cultural environment.

  26. Charles_henry_bedue_int_list

    Charles-Henry Bédué started taking his unusual reportage shots at society parties and fashion events whilst working in Shanghai and then Beijing. L’Habit Fait Le Moine (or The Clothes Make The Man) began as a way for the French photographer to find some satisfaction in a job he didn’t enjoy. After being pleasantly surprised by an accidental picture taken during one of these jobs – the kind that was no use to anyone else – he started to see things differently. Taking a fly-on-the-wall approach and shooting from every unexpected angle, he turned his lens away from unfamiliar faces and zoomed in on the textures and folds of their clothes and the movements of gesticulating limbs. “I started to not see a difference between the job and the art, realising that if I could continue to evolve freely as a reporter, every subject could bring me meaningful pictures for my work,” he explains.

  27. David-vintiner-gem-fletcher--itsnicethat-list

    Traditions are funny things, aren’t they? What seems on first impression to be just man wearing a spacesuit made out of moss (why not?) is in actual fact a highly revered aspect of the Corpus Christi procession in Bejar, Spain. And if it weren’t for art director Gem Fletcher and photographer David Vintiner, who laboriously investigated and documented the process, I’d be none the wiser.

  28. Ewen-spencer-itsnicethat-list

    I’ve got nothing but admiration for household name photographers who, even at the peak of their careers, use zines to get their freshest work out into the world. Cue Ewen Spencer’s newest edition of Guapamente, a staple-bound photobook which peers guilelessly into a new subculture with each issue, and which is now on issue number four. This time around it’s Jam & Cheese he’s getting out into the world, a collection of photos of the skaters who take over East London’s Stratford Centre overnight at the weekends, wearing skates built out of ice skates, and ready to forget everything except skating.

  29. Raymond_cauchetier_itsnicethat_list

    During the 60s Raymond Cauchetier was a film set photographer on some of the most important films of the French New Wave. From À Bout de Souffle to Jules et Jim, Raymond was among the stars and directors that made this period of time so remarkable including Jean Seberg, Anna Karina, Francois Truffant and Jean Luc Godard. His photos were originally intended for continuity and sometimes publicity, but Raymond saw himself as more of a photojournalist and captured images that showed all of the set: shooting on handheld cameras, the unplanned scenes and the initial conversations between the actors and directors.

  30. Perou-itsnicethat-list

    Japanese lesbian turned shaven-headed Marilyn Manson documentarist and portrait photographer is quite the trajectory. Throw into that timeline a period spent considering being a long-distance lorry driver or Christian missionary in Africa, and you’ve got the story of either a deeply fascinating individual or a bit of a raconteur. Photographer PEROU, we reckon, is both. 

  31. Alina-asmus-itsnicethat-list

    Photographer Alina Asmus studied and worked as a fashion designer in Israel, London and Berlin before deciding to turn her hand to fashion photography, and her rigorous training in clothing construction and the nature of textiles is clear from the off in her work. The photographer couples her clean, pared-back aesthetic with unusual artistic direction to capture unseen angles and sculptural forms, glimpsing the strange ways fabrics fall over the body.

  32. Jack-davison-london-int-list-3

    London photographer Jack Davison is fast making a name for himself with his singular lens. Crisp with just the right amount of grit, his portraits are timeless in their subject whilst being modern in their execution. Swinging between a pensive documentary style in black and white and experimental plays of colour and composition, Jack’s work is a study in contrast.

  33. Mariette_pathy_allen_itsnicethat_list

    Mariette Pathy Allen’s photographs are striking because they’re unlike any series about the transgender community I’ve seen before. Rather than focusing on the the theatrics and glamour often presented to us, Mariette wanted to capture the everyday life of a community who were choosing to live in the gender that felt most comfortable to them. Mariette’s photographed the transgendered community for 30 years now but that first photograph was completely by luck. “In 1978 I was in New Orleans for Mardi Gras. I stayed in the same hotel as a group of cross-dressers who invited me to join them for breakfast on the last morning,” Mariette explains. “When I took a group picture, I was moved by looking into the eyes of one of the people in the group. I felt as though I was looking at the essence of a human being, rather than a man or woman.”

  34. Juno-calypso-itsnicethat-list-2

    If your idea of a dreamy night in is to check in to a couple’s suite at the Honeymoon Hotel in Pennsylvania alone and armed with nothing but a camera, a suitcase full of wigs, a number of questionable-looking beauty devices and a can of foreign hot dogs, then you’ve found a kindred spirit in Juno Calypso. “It was awkward,” she says. The London-based photographer captured our hearts and that dark place in our minds that’s usually devoted to Stanley Kubrick and Cindy Sherman with her last series back in 2013. That was when we first met Joyce, her alter-ego.

  35. Emily-maye-itsnicethat-list

    When we caught up with Emily Maye this week, she was halfway through a mad tour of Colombia, Italy, Spain, Belgium and Switzerland, with France still to come. “Then home for some rest!” she told us. In hindsight, it’s something of a miracle we were able to catch her at all.

  36. Its-nice-that-list-03riccardo-banfi---tnx-2013

    The connotations of club photography are more Chupa-Chup sucking gurners than chiaroscuro, so it’s a pleasant surprise to see the world of dance music depicted in sensitive monochrome usually associated with more genteel pursuits. Milan-based photographer Riccardo Banfi has recently put together Tnx , a book of his images shot at house music club TENAX in Florence. They’re gorgeous portraits that cast a calmness over the mania of clubbing, capturing dance as an artform and clubbing as a valid cultural pursuit. The book’s publisher, Yes I Am Writing a Book, says: “The pictures in Tnx … throw us in the middle of TENAX’s crowd and corridors, with a rhythmical and pressing sequence, trying to convey through images the formal exactness of a [dance] track.”

  37. Alexander_short_selfie_stick_itsnicethat_list

    Probably the number one stocking filler of Christmas 2014, the selfie stick has only heightened the narcissism epidemic and further perpetuated the social media notion that if you don’t document your face at a place then you were never there. In Alexander Short’s series Take a Good Look at Yourself, he perfectly encapsulates how hilarious these selfie stick portraits look to the people around them. Like the technological equivalent of shouting that you’re having a great time, it’s hilarious to see people on their own, in couples or big groups so determined to get these perfect self-portraits.

  38. David_graham_where_we_live_list

    “I am not comfortable with the term ‘Americana’,” says photographer David Graham. “My photographs are often about people’s passions – the way they have painted their house, the kind of car they own, the sculpture they built in their front yard, the way they dress up for a parade or how they have taken on the impersonation of a celebrity or historic figure,” he explains. For over 30 years David has taken to the road, working with archetypes of American vernacular photography from the snapshot to the family portrait to holiday pictures. In his tireless cross-country documentation of the American cultural landscape, he manages to colourfully capture the run-of-the-mill and the offbeat in the same image, allowing the ordinary to seem surreal and vice versa. This is what makes his photographs surprising and familiar at the same time.

  39. Amy-lombard-itsnicethat-list

    Nail art is something of an overlooked discipline on It’s Nice That – it’s not often it really flits into our line of vision – so when Amy Lombard got in touch last week to tell us she had collaborated with nail artist Natalie Pavloski on a series of photographs featuring some spangly fingertips, we couldn’t really say no. The photographer has employed her signature bright, saturated style to capture Natalie’s work clasping at greasy burgers, fried chicken, slices of pizza and the odd corn dog, “from White Castle to Taco Bell,” as Amy says, and the resulting shots are as glorious and grotesque as they come. Match made in heaven?

  40. Dana-stirling_dead-water_03its-nice-that-list

    While “ruin porn” as it’s so charmingly known is nothing new, there’s more to Dana Stirling’s work than simply exhuming decrepit architecture with her lens. The series Dead Water shows the Kibuts Kalia Atraktzia water park near the Dead Sea in Israel, a site that holds personal significance for the artist. “The Atraktzia [was] an oasis of sweet water in the sea of death,” Dana explains. “Many Israelis share memories of Atraktzia as part of their tradition of family vacations and weekends. I have never had the chance of experiencing it for myself, yet I grew up knowing of a miraculous fantastic oasis in the middle of nowhere.”