Publication Archive

  1. Lencroyable-itsnicethat-main

    We’ve seen a lot of themed magazines recently. People having a whack at creating publications based around one topic or idea, a little like risky concept albums. Slightly less honed-in than, say, the magazine for redheads, dogs, or cats, this new glossy bi-annual from Paris is themed around adolescence. Created by designer and artist Clotilde Viannay and art directed by Raphaël Garnier, the magazine is centred around one big name – in this issue it is Juliette Greco – who is interviewed about her life, predominantly that sticky awkward bit around the teenage years, to see how it shaped her future.

  2. Mrc1-itsnicethat-main

    Last week redheads all over the world got really hacked off at the announcement of a bunch of new ethnically-diverse Emojis on the iPhone, angered that the flame-haired 2% of the world is still being underrepresented, nay disrespected. In the same week, MagCulture announced its faultless magazine of the week feature bearing a new publication entitled MC1R: A magazine for redheads.

  3. Karlanders-heavybirthday-itsnicethat-list

    I don’t know how much of it can be attributed to the wonders of Google translate, but the “About” paragraph for Karl Anders’ new issue of Der Zirkel, der macht is a hoot. “The worst party of the city follows naturally an equally weighty magazine,” it states. “Divided into the categories of ‘cake, card, candles,’ we penetrate horrible-beautiful and forgotten photo albums of the nineties.”

  4. List

    When we meet for coffee at 9am on a Wednesday morning Dan Stafford is buzzing. He speaks at speed but with accuracy, gulping down his coffee between momentary pauses and flicking his eyes from side to side like a shifty bird. He makes eye contact and breaks it in an instant, searching in the distance for his next thought. It seems he’s been awake for days; He’s definitely been awake for days – he launched his magazine only a day before.

  5. Nic-natives-int-list

    What happens when you take five very talented artists and makers, and send them all off together to a a stone barn in the Lake District to draw, make music, write poetry, take photographs and generally spend time exploring together? Beautiful things, that’s what, as Nicolas Burrows (who is one third of brilliant collective Nous Vous) soon found out.

  6. Jeroensmeets-thejaunt-int-list

    On the spine of The Jaunt book there’s a Latin phrase printed in white capital letters – “qua patent orbis,” which translates as “as far as the world extends.” It’s a fitting motto for this interesting project, which began life as a blog back in 2013. The idea is simple enough, curator Jeroen Smeets sends an artist (Mike Perry, Jordy van den Nieuwendijk, David Shillinglaw) off to an interesting city (Istanbul, Riga, Porto, Los Angeles) in the hope that the trip will “take the artist outside of their comfort zone and let them experience completely new surroundings.”

  7. Johnny-ryan-angry-youth-7

    In 2008 the fourteenth and final issue of Johnny Ryan’s Angry Youth Comix was published and all of a sudden some of the world’s greatest fart jokes, cock drawings, and narratives set inside vaginas disappeared from publication. The world got a little less crude that day. Realising that people crave this kind of horrible filth, Fantagraphics and Johnny have compiled all 14 stinking, degrading, borderline unpublishable issues into one great big compendium of poop and smut. What more can I say? If you’ve got the brain of a 12-year-old boy, if you love needless swearing, repellant characters, bad puns and diarrhea then Angry Youth Comix may be the last book you’ll ever need to buy.

  8. Emilyoberman-snl-int-hero

    One of the undoubted highlights of this year’s Design Indaba conference in Cape Town was hearing Pentagram partner Emily Oberman detail her long-running work on Saturday Night Live. Emily has worked with the programme for 20 years, creating three separate versions of its identity, various title sequences and even spoof adverts to run in the breaks (like this). Now Emily has teamed up with writer Alison Castle to produce Saturday Night Live: The Book, a 500-page paean to the show which coincides with its 40th anniversary this autumn.

  9. Snask-printing-friends-int-list

    “Oh for Christ’s sake how many more independent food magazines could there possibly be?” someone is probably asking right now as they look at this article – and to be fair to them, they’d have a point. But fret not, we aren’t here to herald the arrival of another culinary periodical geared towards the aesthetically-minded foodie. This is in fact Issue 8 of the litho-lover’s fanbook, Printing Friends and the food theme is just a one-off.

  10. Craigoldham-int-main

    Last week a book arrived in our office via the hands of It’s Nice That director Alex Bec. He told us all it was created by Craig Oldham, who he had just seen give a brilliant talk about the creation of the publication. It’s called In Loving Memory of Work, and it is a spectacularly well-designed, excitingly and refreshingly well-informed book documenting the UK miners’ strike between 1984 and 1985. For something so long, violent and shocking that happened in recent history, I’ve sometimes felt that the miners’ strike hasn’t really been talked about as much as it should have been. But I can see why: it’s hard to get to grips with something that horrible happening to so many people and so nearby.

  11. Calm-and-collected-sad-int-list

    About a month ago we stepped off a gloomy grey street in east London and into the rays of an indoor sunshine. At Protein Space in east London a giant orange light was recreating the warmth that emanates from the sun, a steelpan ensemble in the corner was spewing out tropical melodies, and a whole wall plastered in fluorescent illustration and artworks was attracting everybody within a five metre radius, like moths to a printerly flame. The occasion was S.A.D, a weekend exhibition put on by the lads behind Studio Calm & Collected to assuage the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, brought on by the relentless British winter.

  12. Main1

    As numerous Instagram posts will testify, people just love to look at buildings getting knocked down. There’s something so captivating about that huge, brutal, utter destruction and the debris it brings. Perhaps it reminds us of the fleeting transience of life itself. Perhaps we just love mess, cranes and diggers. Either way, this surely universal fascination with smashing shit up means that we’re very, very into a new project from Alina Schmuch, a photographer who has put together the book Script of Demolition.

  13. Gmnieves-main-int

    The only thing more joyous and fascinating than peering at Geoff McFetridge’s paintings is seeing the sketches that were made by his hand in the lead-up to their creation. We’ve gushed before about Geoff a lot, particularly about the fact that he more often than not works from his mind rather than from life. His sketchbooks are full of diagrams and viewpoints invented by his brain and scribbled down before evolving into beautiful, serene paintings, and have just been collected into a new publication from my very own favourite publishers, Nieves.

  14. Chris-clarke-the-guardian-thefashion_redesign_coverstory1-int-list-2

    Described as “bold, bright and boisterous,” The Guardian’s redesign of its biannual magazine The Fashion manages to navigate that tricky aesthetic of merging playful with high-end. The magazine, which launched in 2013, was redesigned by The Guardian deputy creative director Chris Clarke, who aimed to align the supplement more with the paper’s other products. As such, there’s a new display font, a refined icon and a new typographic logo-mark which also acts as a page divider and guides the eye round the content in a simple, almost Bauhaus-esque way.

  15. Krass-mag-10-int

    KRASS is a nod to the function of a magazine as something to be taken home, read in bed, cut up, stuck up, passed around,” says Sanja Grozdanic, co-founder of the new publication. “We were motivated by the lofty ideals one finds studying Journalism or Literature, that are quickly extinguished in the real world. The medicine for that is to create your own world – one that happens to grant you access to a never-ending supply of brilliant minds.”

  16. Brick_01_cover_wizkhalifa-int-list

    There’s no question that BRICK has been the attraction of choice in the It’s Nice That studio this week. Its fluorescent green logotype and Wiz Khalifa’s fixing gaze on the cover combine to act like metal to magpies, and within seconds of picking it up you’ve been drawn in. It might be to a feature in which ex Death Row Records employee Nina Bhadreshwar reflects on her friendship with Tupac, or one where Cam’ron and T.I. discuss staying relevant after 15 years in the game, or editor-in-chief Grant Brydon gets inside the brain of Joey Bada$$. Either way, there’s no putting it down.

  17. Dbg-book-int-list

    We’re huge fans of David Brandon Geeting at It’s Nice That, so news that his work has been immortalised in the form of a gloriously colourful new publication by Pau Wau books was music to our tired ears. Infinite Power is full of his characteristic still lifes, removing everyday objects from common use to make them appear utterly isolated and a bit strange. Copper piping topped with an egg? Check. A fluffy rug paired with a garlic clove? It’s in there. A never-ending hug of extension leads? He’s got that too. David, you complete us.

  18. Nikhartley-everyst-3-int

    Nik Hartley’s Every Street records three days worth of haircut highlights at Stylz barber shop in North-East Lancashire. Alongside the strong cuts are shots of the red-brick terraces that line the streets, bunting and electricity pylons. There’s a nice sense of pride to the portraits, both of a good haircut and more pertinently, the social hub of a hometown.

  19. Ewen-spencer-int-list-new

    To describe Ewen Spencer as anything less than a pillar of British counterculture would be to do him an extreme disservice. Having served stints at iconic magazines The Face and Sleazenation in the 1990s he has since watched the rise and fall of UK garage, documented the grittiest corners of grime, shot teenagers partying in Napoli and Ayia Napa and caught the best of European styling which has made its way over to Miami. He actually told us about some of it at our Here conference last year, and if you’re interested you can watch the full talk here.

  20. Boys-girls-list-int

    I realise that a key part of my job is overcoming the difficulty in describing for the internet just how great printed matter is in the flesh, but with Girls and Boys magazines I really feel like I’ve got my work cut out for me. Created by fashion photographer and art director Brendan Freeman, the two new biannual publications celebrate the freshest in new model talent, and they do so in the simplest, cleanest way imaginable – large-format black-and-white magazines which pair outfit shots with close-up portraits.

  21. Garywallis-mcqueen-int-list

    There’s a wave of adoration sweeping across London for Alexander McQueen at the moment, almost exactly five years after his untimely death in 2010, and it feels something like a homecoming. This is due in no small part to the upcoming showing of Savage Beauty, an exhibition of his life’s work which was first seen at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art four years ago, and which will open at the V&A on 14 March with a wealth of new exhibits.

  22. Mask-make-up-by-andrea-helgadottir-for-volta_-photo-courtesy-bernhard-kristinn

    There have been few books with as much hype as the Björk: Archives. Designed by M/M (Paris), the publication is formed of a big, black box with brightly-coloured paper pamphlet inserts, detailing Björk’s varied and brilliant career with stunning photography. The booklets were designed to look like sheet music, aiming to convey the Björk that’s a composer, rather than the eccentric swan-wearer perhaps most often depicted.

  23. Elanaschlenker-half-wild-list

    Is there anything better than when two talented creatives get together to collaborate on a project which funnels their combined skills into something really brilliant? Take a look at Half Wild, the new photobook by photographer Peter Happel Christian and designer Elana Schlenker, which is so good it was named one of the Best Photobooks of 2014 by Humble Arts.

  24. Hatopress-book-5-int_copy

    I stand by my assertion that the opening scene of Martin Scorsese’s Mean Streets, when Harvey Keitel’s character throws his head down to his pillow and the opening seconds of The Ronettes’ Be My Baby play out is one of the finest moments in cinema. It’s great. And as well as a great ear for soundtracks, Scorsese has discerning Italian-American tastebuds that he stirs through his movies like you would parmesan to a pomodoro.

  25. Invitation-strictly-personal-list-int

    Fashion show invites might be among the most highly revered of all printed ephemera – they serve a purpose which goes far beyond simply specifying a time and a place for a designer to show a collection. Invites are the key into a hallowed space reserved for those who have been selected, they present the first magical glimpse at what radical new direction a designer might be taking in the new season’s collection, they take every form imaginable – marked pill bottles, origami peacocks, bags, mock credit cards – and they are incredibly collectible. And one man who has taken stock of all these factors is Iain R. Webb. 

  26. Fontanel-dutch-design-talents-int-list

    Here at It’s Nice That we love discovering young creative talent – and feel a responsibility to identify and promote new artists and designers – but the challenge can sometimes feel daunting. So anything that can help point us in the right direction is hugely appreciated, such as this new book from Dutch creative site Fontanel. It has run a feature called The Fontanel Finals for the past five years, a scheme which showcases graduation shows and identifies the most interesting practitioners it finds each summer.

  27. Breakdownpress-studio-2-int

    Independent comics publisher Breakdown Press grew out of common interests, shop floor flirtations and conversations about the potential of a magazine that would champion young artists and provide a space for critical comics discourse. With the realisation that the best way to achieve its aims would be to publish comics that felt important, rather than writing critically around the subject, Breakdown Press sidelined producing a magazine in favour of publishing the work of artists who deserve to be recognised.

  28. Hipgnosis-portraits-p193-int-list

    You can almost smell the creativity, hash and late late nights behind the images in Hipgnosis Portraits. Or perhaps that’s just the super-shiny, huge full-colour pages. Either way, the enormous tome from Thames & Hudson transports you into a world of surreal scenes formed of surreal characters, taking us into the archives of the Hipgnosis design agency that helped form the mythologies surrounding some of the biggest names in music in the 20th Century.

  29. Juliahasting-akademiexmain-int

    A few weeks back, an enormous book the colour of a tube of Love Hearts landed on my desk. It was Akademie X: Lessons in Life an Art. Not often does a book look this succulent: the weight, texture and little details were enough to have the whole editorial team cooing over it. Published by Phaidon, it’s a collection of lessons written by artists such a Miranda July, Katharina Grosse, Walead Beshty, Marina Abramovic, Tim Rollins, John Stezaker and many others.

  30. Draw-down-cleon-peterson-int-list

    If you’re a fan of the explicit ultra violence prevalent Cleon Peterson’s work you already know Draw Down’s latest monograph on the artist is going to be an essential volume for your collection. If you’ve never encountered him or you’re faint of heart then this might not be one for you. Either way there’s a foreword written by Shepard Fairey, an essay discussing Cleon’s place in art history by Christopher and Kathleen Sleboda and of course plenty of Cleon’s magnificent work. It may be graphic in the basest sense with its visceral merging of violence and sex, but we’ve always been fans of these chaotic monochrome orgies and can’t wait to own some in print. Get pre-ordering!

  31. Newyorker-90th-int-list

    Here’s a piece of useless trivia you never thought you needed; what is the name of the monocle-wearing dandy who appeared on the first ever cover of The New Yorker and has gone on to become its mascot? The answer is Eustace Tilley, and for many years the magazine published his image almost unchanged when its birthday rolled around at the end of February.

  32. Sarah-hyndman-the-type-taster-int6

    Over the past couple of years, I’ve eaten sans serif, I’ve made huge typographic swear words with an ex, I’ve wandered Dalston taking pictures of kebab shop exteriors and I’ve seen Bodoni predict my fortune. Hell, I’ve even tried typographic dating. Why? Because of Sarah Hyndman, the one woman tour-de-force behind the Type Tasting enterprise, which takes a fun approach to typography and how it affects us emotionally.

  33. Sambradley-court-1-int_copy

    The result of countless late nights in a college studio watching NBA games, COURT is Louis Bennett and our sister agency INT Works’ very own Callum Green’s editorial answer to the trade rumour reports and power ranking speculation that litters basketball journalism.

  34. Closeyoureyes-list-1

    Close Your Eyes, the newest publication from Northern Ireland-born and London-based photographer Gareth McConnell, is one of those books which seems to boil history down and to present it for inspection. Gareth describes it as a “frenzied reworking” of his accumulated archive; it brings together over ten years worth of photographs of rave culture, of civil gatherings and of riots, all of which is placed side-by-side with found imagery from the internet, shots from historical moments and personal and political perspectives. 

  35. Michaeldeforge-list-int

    If you were to pick up Michael DeForge’s First Year Healthy struck by a wave of naive curiosity, you’d be making a grave mistake. Pink and sweet-looking though it may be, it couldn’t be further from a children’s story: rather, the newest publication by the Toronto-based cartoonist is a bizarre and mysterious tale about mental health, magic cats and very big hair.

  36. Philip-jodidio-taschen-cabins-int-list

    If you were under the sad misapprehension that a cabin was nothing more than a timber shack in the woods then think again sunshine because publishing powerhouse TASCHEN has just dropped a weighty new tome designed to prove you wrong. It’s recently released Cabins, a 450-page epic by Philip Jodidio that explores the many and varied forms that the traditional residence of shepherds and hermits might take – from brutalist mountain-top penthouses to more traditional timber structures tucked away on the forest floor. The photography, texts and format of the book are all pretty stunning, but the entire package is tied together with luxurious vector illustrations from Cruschiform that show floor plans and idealised renderings of a selection of these superb structures.

  37. Buttsofflorence

    Erik Benjamins’ Butts of Florence is a collection of writing about finding yourself, restaurants and butts, all over Florence. Erik travelled to Florence from the US for six weeks of “teaching, walking, watching, thinking, eating and learning.” It sounds very idyllic – and somewhat like a trailer for a top Hollywood coming of age/finding yourself/mid-life crisis movie.

  38. Kayeblegvad-press-9-int_copy

    Established by illustrator Kaye Blegvad, Horizontal Press is a small pornographic press specialising in “small batch jazz mags and seminal works.” Based in Brooklyn, Horizontal Press keeps its tongue firmly in cheek, “[taking pleasure] in publishing erotic works for the discerning horndog.” If that wasn’t news enough, it’s launching this Valentine’s Day – just in time for you to send your loved one, or yourself, a Tijuana Bible by some of illustration’s most glittering stars. There’s Rose Blake, Clay Hickson and Lizzy Stewart to name but a few.

  39. Listtopgrand_book_00

    It was only a matter of time before someone committed the gloriously dreamy pink-paletted world of Wes Anderson’s film The Grand Budapest Hotel to book form, and here it is – a tome as magical as the movie. The book, entitled The Wes Anderson Collection: The Grand Budapest Hotel, is written by Matt Zoller Seitz and designed by Martin Venezky, bolstered by more than 300 colour and black and white photographs. The book explores the beautiful world of the ‘Budapest through behind-the-scenes snaps and a wealth of charming illustrations, as well as anecdotes from Anderson about the process of making the film. As with anything Wes Anderson-based, it somehow manages to be terrifically cutesy, quirky and idiosyncratic without making you want to throw up, which is something of an achievement in itself.

  40. Taschen-psychedelicsex-list-int.png

    Unless we ask our parents (which we will certainly not be doing) us young’ns will never really know if sex in the 1960s and 70s was better than it is now. They say a lot of things are better when you’re on acid, so I can imagine the rumours are true: being naked in the company of someone else, and getting down and dirty on some hand-embroidered rugs sounds far superior than a quick bonk in the dark with your iPhone pinging in the background.