Publication Archive

  1. List

    The hugely talented, crisply bearded Owen Gildersleeve popped into the studio last week to deliver a copy of his new book and my word it’s a real belter. Paper Cut: An Exploration into the Contemporary World of Papercraft Art and Illustration does exactly what it says on the cover by way of showcase 25 case studies into individuals and studios working in this medium. From Rob Ryan and Chrissie Macdonald to Andersen M Studio and Le Creative Sweatshop, the subjects come from different countries and use different creative approaches to make the most of paper’s tactile qualities.

  2. List

    It’s no secret that in spite of the increasing digitisation of contemporary culture, we still dearly love to hold actual objects in our hands – and the more elaborate the better. It’s a fact that record labels, magazines, publishers and most other spheres of the packaging industries have been exploiting for some time, fashioning beautifully ornate objects for which fans are only too happy to part with vast sums; whether it’s a die-cut, debossed, double gatefold or otherwise.

  3. List-1

    “Summer summer summertime,” sung The Fresh Prince’s backing singers in his smash hit song, Summertime. Why? Because he freakin’ loves summertime – and so do we!

  4. List

    The trouble with the wealth of magazines populating the shelves of newsagents worldwide these days is that too many of them purport to be something they’re not; a look at global culture in 100 pages, for example, or a snapshot of the newest, freshest, most exciting trends. Perdiz magazine, on the other hand simply claims to be about happiness; a humble goal, but one which this brightly coloured publication achieves very, very well.

  5. Bartkira-list

    Fan art is a weird and wonderful world with laws entirely unto itself. Long-term lovers of comics, film and heavy metal bands (it’s usually these three demographics) with even slight artistic leanings love nothing more than to scribble their heroes onto any spare surface they can find – acetate cells, copy paper and even their own skin. In the field of fan art though, one recent project is head and tails above the rest: Bartkira.

  6. List

    Studio Hato have been around in some guise or another since 2009, although they’ve only recently given themselves an official name. They’re the design branch of a multi-faceted organisation that also includes Hato Press (an exceptional Risographic print studio) and Hato Labo (a digital design and programming team) all based in north east London. Its founders, Jackson Lam and Ken Kirton, have been around since the very beginning, working away on a multitude of commercial projects behind the scenes, while the reputation of the press has grown.

  7. List

    Every time a new erotic title comes through the door we wonder how long they’ll survive. There’s so many “intelligent” magazines out there with a penchant for nudity that we assume only a few will last more than a couple of issues – even if the quality is superb. One title in the erotic stable that continues to grow and develop is Odiseo, a publication from Barcelona’s Folch studio that’s more of a book than a magazine. In it you’ll find a sensitive approach to erotic subjects and a wealth of illuminating opinion pieces all of which subvert what we’ve come to define as erotic in the digital age.

  8. List

    We featured Madeleine Waller for her photographs of swimmers at London Fields Lido way back in 2010, so you can imagine our delight to find that these very charming images have been published in a book all of their own, entitled East London Swimmers, by Hoxton Mini Press.

  9. List

    Book cover designer Peter Mendelsund has just finished work on a publication that brings together the fruits of his career thus far in the form of a rather beautiful monograph. To those of us that know his work well it seems like a deserved achievement to have it represented in a book of his own, but he’s typically modest of the honour: “After producing enough passable design to have established a reputation – and after having participated in the requisite interviews, given the obligatory talks, and pursued the necessary whimsical side projects of varying natures – it is de rigeur that a designer should then publish a book of his or her work.” And so he has.

  10. List

    In 1978 Greg Reynolds was a closeted homosexual working as a youth minister for a large, conservative, religious organisation in the USA; the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. His role was to train young Christian men and women to evangelise their peers in their hometowns. During term-time Greg would travel the country to colleges and universities, then in the summer his work would take him to Bible camps in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  11. List

    Graphic designer, photographer and collector Marc Walter has amassed an extraordinary collection of photographs for TASCHEN’s latest publication An American Odyssey. With them he creates a comprehensive picture of the new world in its earliest days, all ramshackle mining towns in the Midwest, steam boats in New York’s first ports and an explosion of new industrial cities. Not only does this collection of images provide a unique examination of life over a century ago, it presents it all in full colour by virtue of techniques called Photochrom and Photostint that predated autochrome by almost 20 years – capturing “the rich ochres and browns of the Grand Canyon” and “the dazzle of Atlantic City” for all to see.

  12. Main

    The world is a funny old place, full as it is with landscapes so far beyond my realm of understanding that I can barely even begin to comprehend they exist. To see environments such as Australia’s salt mines crystallised in a photography series is understandably quite impressive then, and no more so than the landscapes themselves; vast expanses of white populated only by the occasional crane and digger and overhung with a glorious blue sky,

  13. Main

    What a joy it is to come into It’s Nice That and have a filthy, hardback comic book that you’ve been waiting patiently for for what feels like FOREVER sat on your desk. Forming II is the brainchild of Jesse Moynihan, infamous comic book creator and storyboarder for widely-loved cartoon, Adventure Time. For some reason I personally cannot get into the latter, but the former I love with all of my heart.

  14. List1

    The fourth issue of Hannah K. Lee’s risograph zine, Everyone Else is Younger and More Talented, is a beautiful portrayal of the insecurities felt by every young artist. Spiky, stringy shapes and forms wriggle through one another, evoking nerves and the inside of a mind which is riddled with doubt. On one side of a page, Hannah portrays a dream compliment, and on the other, a twisted, frightful version, a fear of what people might say or think. A lovely little book of wonderfully expressive patterns and designs, there to remind you that you are never alone in your anxieties.

  15. List

    Paris-based graphic designer Michael Thorsby originally hails from Sweden, but has travelled across Tokyo, Copenhagen and London picking up influences and developing his work before settling in Paris with a visual language that’s entirely his own. His projects vary enormously from luxurious pattern design fro the likes of Sixpack France, beautiful posters for obscure bands and laboriously 3D rendered commercials for automobile brands. There’s seemingly nothing he can’t do.

  16. List

    We thought Molly Molloy and Gianni Tozzi set the bar pretty high with the first issue of Parterre de Rois which combined carefully curated content and first-rate art to create a seamless first instalment of a new publication, all based on the theme “carnal.” As the second issue proves however, even the excellent can be bettered the second time around.

  17. Holooo

    The first issue of HOLO has arrived, tele-beamed straight from the not so distant future, and it’s a fantastic document of all things manifest in the post-machine age. The magazine is an intriguing blend of various editorial formats, striking images, curious interviews and carefully curated content, and it plots a detailed and fascinating trajectory into a future that, whilst reading the magazine, you begin to realise is already with us.

  18. Main

    It’s common knowledge that Granta produce beautiful books, so it’s hardly surprising that their latest selection of new writing, themed around the idea of Japan, comes so prettily packaged. With exquisite illustration peppered throughout, this book is a wonderful exploration of the idea of Japan, a country so recognisable to us, and yet which can seem so mysterious and distant. 

  19. Main

    Just in time for Summer, Issue 6 of The Plant has sprung, and it’s a beautiful bouquet of all things botanical. Dedicated to flowers and flora, weeds and weeping willows, the journal brings together the works of all kinds of green thumbed creatives.

  20. List

    We first came across photographer Colin O’Brien last autumn, when we interviewed him about his stunning 1987 series Traveller’s Children in London. The book which housed the series was an understated affair, allowing his monochromatic images to speak for themselves, which they did in volumes of sentimentality and nostalgia. And while understated can be lovely, Colin’s back catalogue is so extensive – beginning as it does in 1948 and stretching all the way to the present day – that we couldn’t help but feel that he deserved something more.

  21. Main

    Here we are with a brand new rather self-explanatory feature called Behind The Scenes. We’ll kick it off with the lovely Michael Renaud, who has taken time out his busy schedule to chat with us. His time, I assume, is usually filled up with really boring, mundane stuff like commissioning the world’s best illustrators to make hilarious comics, listening to cool music and chatting to photographers about bread.

  22. List

    When two companies come together there are lots of ways to mark the merger; team-building away days, commemorative cupcakes and office politics a’plenty among them. But when tech giants Microsoft officially acquired Nokia last week, they marked the brave new era with this lovely book designed by the fine fellas at TCOLondon.

  23. List

    Elizabeth Dilk is a New York-based graphic designer and art director who has a rare gift. Not in a creepy I-see-dead-people-kind of way, rather she creates work which is stylish without feeling soulless (a compromise we come across more than you’d think). It helps that she’s very versatile, with a portfolio that includes web design, packaging, identities and logo marks, advertising, typography and print and it’s the latter we’ve chosen to focus on this time.

  24. Kitschlittle

    Susan Sontag published Notes on Camp in 1964, looking at popular culture and the idea of taste through an academic lens at a time when the divide between elite and mass culture was collapsing with alarming speed. Cultural commentary like Sontag’s, which guides us and gives us a clue about where we are and what we are and maybe even where we’re heading next, is as important now as ever, so it’s wonderful to see Sara Cwynar’s Kitsch Encyclopedia rigorously deliberating what it might mean for something to be kitsch, and locating the idea of kitsch in the contemporary image world, especially that of the internet.

  25. List

    We don’t want to seem like we’re showing favouritism to particular publications by featuring them repeatedly on the site, but even though we profiled Edition 9 of Process Journal back in October, Edition 10 is equally deserving of attention, and so we’re covering the Aussie mag again.

  26. List-2

    Even now, five years after it was first launched, Twin Magazine is something like newsagent royalty, towering high above other biannuals with a hardback cover and glossy finish that make it feel more like a book than a magazine. Bringing art and fashion together with its unique and considered aesthetic, the publication prides itself on the wealth of imagery it contains, and it’s not difficult to see why.

  27. List

    You know that advert where everything that guy touches turns to Skittles? Well Graphic Thought Facility are like that, only that everything they touch turns to design gold rather than delicious fruity confectionery. They have just art directed the inaugural issue of Modern Design Review which is billed as “a considered and curated insight into modern product and furniture design.”

  28. List

    I Love Helvetica and I Love Times are Two Points’ latest additions to their I Love Type range; books that bring together modern examples of classic typefaces in use across cutting edge graphic design and illustration. Within each are examples of today’s best practitioners breathing life into often-dismissed serifs like Times and reimagining the hugely celebrated (generally overused) sans serif Helvetica. Also included in the series are Futura, Avant Garde, Bodoni, DIN, Gill Sans and Franklin Gothic – all of which have sold out, but which Hong Kong publishers Vition:ary have plans to re-release later in the year. Consider this your heads-up!

  29. List

    I’m an unashamed geek when it comes to journalism (my favourite Twitter feed is easily the Guardian Style Guide for goodness sake) so this new publication from The Times is right up my street. Byline is a quarterly magazine for the newspaper’s subscribers which provides “an exclusive insight into the news-gathering process.”

  30. List

    We already praised Made Thought’s considered G . F Smith rebrand to the skies earlier this week but hot on the heels of the announcement we discovered this terrific book too. Throughout the overhaul of its look and feel, the paper company has been obsessed with promoting its story, justifiably proud of George Frederick Smith’s founding principles and the way they endure in a contemporary commercial climate.

  31. List

    There are various figures whose names I recognise – who have seeped into the contemporary cultural consciousness for some reason or other – but who I know nothing about. Think Zsa Zsa Gabor, Imelda Marcos and Evel Knievel. The latter it turns out (thanks Wikipedia) was an American “daredevil, entertainer, and international icon” who shot to fame in the 1970s and 1980s.

  32. Main

    It was in 2007 that Yusuke Miyagawa’s Funky Jamaica first came out, but we were only just starting up then, so excuse us for missing it. In the intervening seven years the Brooklyn-based, Japanese photographer has become a regular at Dazed and Confused and INDIE, repeatedly commissioned for his beautifully up-close-and-personal style of documentary photography in which he consistently confronts his subjects head on. That said, we’ve yet to see him produce a body of work as cohesive as his Jamaican masterpiece.

  33. List

    Just in case you needed any further proof that women are producing some incredibly high quality girl-focused projects just now, here’s another. Girls Like Us is a magazine produced in Amsterdam and Belgium, and it channels exactly the combination of engaging content, beautiful design and nonchalance that we’re into.

  34. List

    Both tattoos and secret codes may be considered cool in isolation; bring them together and it’s fair to say our heads have been well and truly turned. The latest book from Damon Murray and Stephen Sorrell – aka design studio and publishing imprint FUEL – builds on the huge success of their previous books focusing on Russian tattoos.

  35. List

    It might be argued that if you were to take a selection of women whose job it is to be startlingly beautiful, and then have extremely capable photographer Alessandro Furchino photograph them, you’d have a hard time making a book of the images that was anything less than lovely. That simply isn’t true, though, and Andy Massaccesi’s excellent work in designing Sublime for the model agency Monster Management is absolutely not to be sniffed at.

  36. List

    Historians have long appreciated the cultural necessity of gathering oral testimonies about the past from those who experienced it while we still have the chance. Brooklyn-based artist Rachel Sussman has spent 10 years applying this same principle to the natural world, and the fruits of her extraordinary labours have now been published in a stunning new book. The Oldest Living Things In The World is exactly what it sounds like; a photographic documentation of 30 of our planet’s most enduring natural phenomena; featuring lichens and shrubs, fungi, coral and Apsen trees all of which have been around for more than 2,000 years (and in the case of the Apsen trees, a mind boggling 80,000 years).

  37. List

    There’s great anecdote in Rick Poynor’s introduction to Think In Colour, a celebration of Belgian graphic designer Hugo Puttaert and his Visionandfactory studio. In 2010 Hugo was commissioned to produce a poster for a contemporary art exhibition in Aalst but the clients eventually decided they didn’t like it and rejected it. No matter; Hugo paid for it to be printed himself and then had it flyposted across the city on the eve of the show. “Those who believe in the medium’s potential,” Rick notes shrewdly, “have no alternative but to keep pushing.”

  38. List

    I’m somewhat ambivalent when it comes to themed magazines. At its worst a theme can feel stifling, but at its best it’s actually a portal which opens up a whole world of intriguing content. And so in these cases – though a magazine may profess to be about one thing – it’s really about lots of different things loosely attached (but not tethered) to this theme.

  39. Noon-list

    Noon is a hard thing to photograph. Not so much for practical reasons, like the larger-than-A4 format or the chunky, yellow spine – although both of these factor – but because I can’t help but want to include a picture of every one of its whopping 168 pages.

  40. List

    Brighten The Corners have excellent pedigree when it comes to working with Anish Kapoor. Who can forget the dazzlingly good and deservedly-much-lauded annual report they collaborated on for a lighting company back in 2012? So when Anish needed a catalogue for his first major show in Germany, it’s no great surprise he turned to Frank Philippin and Billy Kiosoglou and the duo worked their magic once again.