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Photography

Nils Jorgensen

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

Street photography of symmetry, coincidence and colour coordination in the everyday. A really nice collection that rewards you for looking at each frame long enough.

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Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Photography View Archive

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    I’m super into these portraits by Maya Fuhr, I think I spent about 45 seconds staring into the pond-coloured eyes of the guy two pics down. Maya’s got this magic touch when it comes to photography, her work is so simultaneously humble and powerful, making her the perfect candidate for quietly strong editorial and personal work. We’ve covered her editorial before – a brilliant photo shoot of girls in messy bedrooms – but something about the power of her portraits made us want to write about her again. She also recently opened up to us about her days as college a fresher, and the perils of choosing the wrong degree (with some brilliant photographs of her in 2008 to accompany it, naturally).

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    In December last year we received a zine in the post from Yorkshire-based photographer Christopher Nunn that documented a small selection of images he’d gathered in Ukraine. Kalush offered a unique perspective on a region that was thrust suddenly and violently into the public consciousness, showing us the quiet, everyday side of a place that – from television coverage at least – you’d have been forgiven for assuming was razed to the ground.

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    Another one pilfered off Haw-Lin here I’m afraid, (I can’t help it if their taste is better than everyone else’s can I?). This charming selection of photographs of aesthetically-blessed chaps hanging out with pedigree dogs is by Philippe Jarrigeon, the man who once charmed us with square oranges back in the day. This shoot was commissioned by the spectacular Double Magazine, and is testament to why they’re currently on their 27th issue – they clearly know what they’re doing content-wise. If you think cute boys and pups are click-bait then I’d be inclined to disagree – the world needs happy photography, and you don’t get much more joy in an editorial than this. Like what you see? Let me point you this way to another fantastic shoot with a similar concept from 2012.

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    Unless you have self-consciously wacky parents, it’s likely you’ll have met someone with the same name first name as you. When you’re younger this can make you feel a less special but these days we just have to grin and bear it. The commonality of first names is a theme Tim Morris has focused on in his George series, which brilliantly catalogues famous Georges in visual form.

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    All too often these days we stumble across a jaw-dropping example of set design, only to discover the impressive final image is actually the result of some clever visual trickery and digital manipulation. That’s an impressive art unto itself, don’t get me wrong, but pure CGI can leave me feeling a little shortchanged.

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    The Daily Nice is one of those online phenomenons that’s been sizzling away in the big internet frying pan since 2004, and this month sees it celebrate its tenth birthday. If you’re not familiar with site (where have you been??), the idea is simple: every day its creator Jason Evans uploads one photograph of something that made him happy. There’s no archive, no social media feeds – just that picture taken by Jason on the site for 24 hours.

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    Anyone who’s worked for Ryan McGinley is probably covered in a lil’ pinch of magic dust when it comes to photography. Eric Chakeen proves this point – his personal and commissioned shots are a wild mix of humour and professionalism that is hard to come by. Working in New York, Eric’s skill lies in his ability to roam the streets and take portraits of people with true personality. From a guy munching on a cigar on a scooter to a dog in a post-vet neck cone, anything he turns his lens on turns to gold. You could argue that it doesn’t take much to get a good shot of Alexa Chung, but would many people choose to photograph her in such a stripped-back way? I think not. How great to see someone doing something that so many people are experimenting with right now, but adding that extra bit of style and wit. Cool guy.

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    I’ve had a soft spot for Akos Major’s photography for a long time now and his project Waters has been added to my virtual ‘like’ pile with no hesitation.

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    In a world packed full of photographers focussing their lenses on the young and the beautiful, Andi Galdi Vinko is the antithesis. The Hungarian photographer has a penchant for the strange and the grotesque: a bare-arsed man embracing a tree, a fur-clad woman browsing a garish supermarket aisle, the thousand-yard stare of a wild-haired dandy, and that outright creepy chap with his taxidermy collection. Aside from being regularly unnerving, Andi’s photographs all manage to achieve a profound sense of spontaneity, each representing a moment of reckless abandon from her subjects or simply a chance encounter with something visually arresting – testament to her quickfire camera skills. She’s currently on the move between London and New York, planning her escape from Hungary because “the art scene here is kind of sad.”

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    There’s something incredibly beautiful and natural about Gráinne Quinlan’s series White Crane Spread Wings where she captures the elderly community of Hong Kong practising Tai Chi throughout the city.

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    Series exploring unusual lives are actually not that unusual; however Robert Ellis’ poetic photographs of the New Line community in Ireland stands out with its quiet beauty. This is part of a project about people but – as the scored-out title We are replaced with Where we are suggests – we can learn so much through seeing the place they live in, that we need not even see them.

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    Just as Jamie Oliver is the go-to man for piling shredded food on to rustic chopping boards, Anushka Blommers and Niels Schumm are the go-to guys for photographing girls in their trademark pubescent wallflower aesthetic. Dazed, AnOther and Vogue have all had the special treatment, partly due to the infamous Class of 1998 Self Service shoot that rocketed the pair to stardom. The in-demand duo have been allocated a spot in the glossy, heavy new issue of POP, in which they take extraordinary beauties and style and shoot them to look as if they are waiting for their date to arrive to take them to a 1970s Texas prom. Part Napoleon Dynamite, part Virgin Suicides, this is Blommers & Schumm joyously doing what they do best.

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    Before you start scrolling through Cara’s work, maybe put on the latest Foxygen track and try to pretend that you’re not slouched on a synthetic chair in a well-lit office, but lounging on a wicker bed in the Chateau Marmont, puffing on a cig and watching the swimming pool through your sunglasses. Cara’s candid shots don’t stray too far from a certain scene: the psychedelic music-makers that have been prevalent in the last few years: Kevin Morby, White Fence, Cate le Bon and Connan Mockasin to name but a few.