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Serena Huang on TED.com

Guest posted by Mimi Leung,

Usually I couldn’t care less about Asian child prodigies prancing around with their violins, but this performance by the then 11 year-old Serena Huang is ace – especially the variations on Yankee Doodle’ at the end (18.40). Amazing.

Posted by Mimi Leung

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