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    Bobby Scheidemann: Nothing to Hide

Photography

Photography: Bobby Scheidemann's new series is a nod to the insta-generation

Posted by Maisie Skidmore,

You know when you go to a museum and head – reluctantly but helplessly – straight towards the most famous work in the whole place, which is invariably also surrounded by the biggest crowd in the building? Then you find that by the time you’ve fought your way close enough to the piece to actually see it, you can only see one sixteenth of it because everywhere you look crazed tourists are desperately thrusting a variety of photographic equipment at it in a bid to capture it to take home and never ever look at ever again?

Yeah, I hate that too, and so, it seems, does Bobby Scheidemann. He’s made this series Nothing to Hide, in which a lone hand pops into the frame to take a picture (often of another picture) and is therefore photographed in the one we’re looking at too. The result is a strangely meta and undoubtedly modern commentary on the insta-ready generation; Bobby seems to sigh begrudgingly at our perpetual desire to photograph the things around us, and then goes ahead and joins in with it anyway, with a mischievous grin and a sideways glance.

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    Bobby Scheidemann: Nothing to Hide

Ms-300

Posted by Maisie Skidmore

Assistant Editor Maisie joined It’s Nice That fresh out of university in the summer of 2013 and has stayed with us ever since. She has a particular interest in art, fashion and photography and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast. She also oversees our London listings guide This At There.

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