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Web

Dutch designer Daan Louter creates impressive interactive CV for The Guardian

Posted by Rob Alderson,

Perma-tanned football manager Ron Atkinson used to have a saying for when one of his over-paid, over-preened superstars went whining to the press about how he should definitely be playing every week no matter what – don’t tell me, show me. I was reminded of Big Ron’s advice late last week when Daan Louter’s interactive CV did the rounds on social media. The Rotterdam-based designer wants to do an internship at The Guardian but rather than write a letter explaining why his skill set was so suited for such a role, he demonstrated it instead. There’s some fun tricks on show and extra marks for his proactive approach to standing out in a crowded marketplace. Your move Guardian…

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    Daan Louter: I Want to Work for The Guardian

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    Daan Louter: I Want to Work for The Guardian

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    Daan Louter: I Want to Work for The Guardian

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Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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