• Etenschap5

    Festina Lente Collective: Etenschap (Photography: Rene Mesman, food stylist: Claartje Lindhout, graphic design: Bas Koopmans)

Graphic Design

Fish-pineapple anyone? Amazing foodie combinations from Festina Lente collective

Posted by Rob Alderson,

We all know that guy who fancies himself a bit of an amateur Heston Blumenthal and so inflicts all manner of very weird and not so wonderful combinations on you in the pursuit of gastronomic originality. Luckily the Festina Lente collective are not making us eat their magnificent culinary combos, but they are using them to create a brilliant identity for the food studio Etenschap. Building on their client’s reputation for experimenting with food “as a product, as an image and as an experience” they’ve brought together unlikely edibles which point to the power of the imagination when it comes to rethinking our relationship with food. The fish-pineapple is a late contender for my image of the year!

  • Etenschap1

    Festina Lente Collective: Etenschap (Photography: Rene Mesman, food stylist: Claartje Lindhout, graphic design: Bas Koopmans)

  • Etenschap3

    Festina Lente Collective: Etenschap (Photography: Rene Mesman, food stylist: Claartje Lindhout, graphic design: Bas Koopmans)

  • Etenschap4

    Festina Lente Collective: Etenschap (Photography: Rene Mesman, food stylist: Claartje Lindhout, graphic design: Bas Koopmans)

  • Etenschap2

    Festina Lente Collective: Etenschap (Photography: Rene Mesman, food stylist: Claartje Lindhout, graphic design: Bas Koopmans)

Ra

Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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