• Wb

    Whitney Biennial

  • As

    The Armory Show

  • Kh

    Keith Haring

Art

First Look 2012: What's On New York

Posted by Charlotte Simmonds,

This year we will be continuing with our bi-weekly What’s On focus on great shows happening in New York. With that in mind, here’s a quick intro to what we’re looking forward to most from the big city on this side of 2012, including a Keith Haring retrospective, the Whitney Biennial and The Armory Show…

Whitney Biennial Whitney Museum

Massive in scope and championing all things contemporary, outlandish and immediate, the Whitney Biennial tirelessly proves to be a dizzying four floors of soul-stoking, mind-buzzing mayhem. This 76th showcase looks set to be another stunner with work from both big-name and emerging artists granted equal weight so that the feel is meritocratic and accessible. Expect an emphasis on film and visual installations as well as two external collaborations featuring  avant-garde music, poetry, and artist talks.  So have a hearty breakfast and put on some comfortable footwear; this is the kind of show worth dedicating your day to. Running from March 1 to May 27.
www.whitney.org/2012biennial

The Armory Show Piers 92 and 94

Already a leading international art fair, The Armory is looking this year to re-establish themselves as the “most adventurous and dynamic” to set up shop in NYC. Taking place on two piers jutting out from Manhattan’s upper-west-side, the show boasts a range of top galleries, a series of experimental films and an Armory Focus on the art of Nordic countries. What sets this event apart, however, is their recent addition of a section specialising in classic works of modern art – now with one ticket visitors can view, say, a rare Alexander Calder alongside the latest on the contemporary scene. Plus the write-up for the launch party (hosted at the MoMA) makes me long for an overpriced cosmopolitan. Oh New York, you sly devil. Runs between March 8 and 11.
www.thearmoryshow.com

Keith Haring Brooklyn Museum

During his brief but intense career, Keith Haring produced works of daring simplicity, redefining what could be achieved through iconography, cartoon and public illustration. This spring his instantly recognisable style will overrun the Brooklyn Museum – the retrospective using his 1978 arrival in New York as a starting point. With over 150 paper-based works on display, as well as rare sketchbooks, posters, subway drawings, photographs, archival objects and experimental videos, this is sure to be an immersive and entertaining look at the much-loved artist’s oeuvre. Opens March 16.
www.brooklynmuseum.org/keith-haring

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Posted by Charlotte Simmonds

Californian Charlotte joined us as an editorial intern after studying at New York university and London Metropolitan University. She wrote for the site between January and March 2012.

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