Film: An in-depth look into Richard Mosse's infrared filming technique for "The Enclave"

Posted by Liv Siddall,

It’s the work that everyone’s talking about, Richard Mosse’s infrared film shot in the heart of Congo that was shown this year at the Venice Biennale in the Irish pavilion. In this short documentary produce by frieze, Richard explains the ideas behind the film and the history behind the method itself. It turns out that infrared film, which picks up chlorophyl from only the healthiest living plants, was produced in the 1940s by the military to help them see enemies hiding out in the bushes.

The infrared light that it picks up is entirely invisible to the human eye, and reveals a candy-floss pink, ultra bright world. Richard took this method of filming to the Congo, mirroring it’s nature with the nature of the country itself, and highlighting the relatively unknown levels of war conflict and violence (5.4 million people have been killed there since 1998)

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    Richard Mosse: _Still from The Enclave

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    Richard Mosse: _Still from The Enclave

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    Richard Mosse: _Still from The Enclave

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    Richard Mosse: _Still from The Enclave

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    Richard Mosse: _Still from The Enclave

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Posted by Liv Siddall

Liv joined It’s Nice That as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our editors. She oversees itsnicethat.com and has a particular interest in illustration, photography and music videos. She also runs our London listings site This At There, and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.