• Tom-rainford-lead

    Tom Rainford: A Social Life (still)

Animation

Introducing...The rhythmic animations and illustrations of Tom Rainford

Posted by Anna Trench,

Animator and illustrator Tom Rainford only graduated from Winchester Art School a couple of years ago, but the showreel he sent in whirled us away with its original characters, confident colours and lovely rhythms. After sharpening his craft for a year at London animation studio Art & Graft Tom’s wisely headed to the countryside to make animation magic far from the madding crowd.

If the sweetly drawn and wittily narrated Grocery Day and the intriguing Jeremy Crab are anything to go by, this chap’s one to watch. So we thought we’d catch up with Tom to find out more…

  • Workspace

    Tom Rainford’s desk

  • Social_screenshot_2

    Tom Rainford: A Social Life (still)

  • Social_screenshot_1

    Tom Rainford: A Social Life (still)

Where do you work?

I worked in London for a while but now I work at my home in the countryside, just outside of Manchester. It really is the best of both worlds. The design hub – sorry, second bedroom – is shared with my photographer girlfriend. The shared space facilitates frequent debate over which medium is better. Illustration, obviously.

How does your working day start?

I get up at 8am and make the commute across my landing. I say hi to the hamsters – they usually wait up long enough to watch me start work before they go to sleep again. I usually then check emails and catch up on the design world, before the ‘magic’ starts.

How do you work and how has that changed?

Things have changed a lot over the past two years. I graduated in 2011 and went to work at Art & Graft in London, which was a great jumping-in experience and completely different to the way you work as a student. Now I’m working for myself, I get much more control over what I produce, so I’m working on my own animated short film as well as doing freelance jobs. Also, if I really wanted to, I can work all day in pyjamas, which would have been frowned upon in the past.

Where would we find you when you’re not at work?

Outside of commercial hours, I’m working on my short film. It’s shaping up nicely so far, but it’s still a long road ahead. Other than that I’m pretty much getting beaten by my girlfriend on the Xbox or trying to forget about it down the pub.

Would you intern for yourself?

If you can clone me I’ll do it!

  • Workinprogress-short_film_design

    Tom Rainford: work in progress – short film design

  • Jeremy_crab

    Tom Rainford: Jeremy Crab

  • Jeremy_crab_closeup2

    Tom Rainford: Jeremy Crab

  • Brave_new_world_1

    Tom Rainford: Brave New World

  • Brave_new_world_3

    Tom Rainford: Brave New World

Portrait16

Posted by Anna Trench

Anna is a writer and illustrator who joined us as an editorial intern after studying at Cambridge University and Falmouth university. She wrote for the site between January and March 2013.

Most Recent: Animation View Archive

  1. List

    Contrary to popular belief, libraries can be wildly fun and psychedelic places if you’ve got the right tools to work with. Here and willing to help me prove my point are Tord Torpe and Magnus Nyquist, who created an animation to this end. Entitled KHIB Biblioteket after the library at their school, Bergen Academy of Art and Design in Norway, the animation sees a bandy-legged gent wandering absent-mindedly up to his library door, only to be thrown head first into a world of Memphis-inspired jumping shapes, swirling perspectives, fast-paced bright flashing colours and lights and morphing letterforms. It’s an incredibly ambitious project for a pair of students and happily it succeeds magnificently in its task, even being awarded a prize by Norwegian design blog Grafill.

  2. Main

    Did you know that the first episode of Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared has had nearly 21 million views on YouTube so far? With that in mind, since launching three days ago, the third instalment of the cult series is marching quickly towards the million-hit mark. Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared 3 is the much-anticipated follow-up to the very well-recieved previous epidoes which you can see here and here. This time, the characters are spending a day in the countryside, having a delicious raw chicken picnic when suddenly their day is dampened by a pesky butterfly landing in their basket of meat.

  3. List-2

    If you’re anything like me, the 1990s were a decade dedicated to pogs, the Spice Girls, Hey Arnold and Clarissa Explains It All and with those keys players to occupy us it’s no surprise we were too busy to pause and take note of all the great slang vocal being flung around. Fortunately i-D were more than happy to recount the lot in their classic alphabetical fashion, and they even recruited the marvellous Layzell Bros to help them.

  4. List

    The internet is a weird and fantastical thing when you really think about it – fuelling so much more than our social lives and procrastination, it’s a constantly growing, unpredictable entity. Celebrating the wonders of the world wide web are animation studio Buck, based in Los Angeles and New York.

  5. List

    Moving pictures and music are a simple, universal pleasure, which is probably why I’m so drawn to Drew Tyndall’s series of animations, Loops.

  6. List-3

    I’m happy to admit that after watching all three minutes and 47 seconds of Stevie Gee’s new music video for Archie Bronson Outfit, my computer desktop is littered with so many screenshots of boobs, beers and motorbikes in psychedelic hues that I can scarcely find anything else. And the thing is I don’t even mind.

  7. List2

    Nothing helps the brain learn better than a good old visual aid, so what better way to tackle Harvard’s online neuroscience course than to watch these clever animations.

  8. Listtttt

    Lumiere Studios’ experiments in RealFlow software seamlessly flow out of the territory of tech and funnel into something rather lovely. The London-based animation design and production studio has uploaded a number of its tinkerings that showcase the software’s Hybrido system, taking the viewer through an impressive behind-the-scenes look at how it builds up simulations of gushing water. Stripped of their drama, the animations have a quiet pathos about them. As the building-blocks of the final effects, the vivid blues of the Truck Street video seem all the more arresting, silently flooding the streets and washing away their contents. In the museum animation, different volumes of fluid are contrasted against the eerie steps, elevating the experiment into something quite dazzling in its own right.

  9. Ffff

    Visual effects artist Dave Fothergill’s hypnotising animation I’ve Fallen, And I Can’t Get Up! is a glorious combination of schadenfreude, and an investigation into the capabilities of some high-end visual software.

  10. List

    If, like me, you spent many an hour in your teenage years gazing absentmindedly at Larry Carlson’s experimental website Medijate, you’ll no doubt be similarly transfixed by The Landfill from the very talented Santtu Mustonen. Stitching together a “collection of unused sketches, leftover drawings and rejected ideas from forgotten projects” to a mesmerising soundtrack by Tuomas Alatalo, Santtu created a hypnotic animation that’s a work of art in its own right.

  11. List

    Spanish DJ duo The Zombie Kids are bringing some colour and mischief to the world with their track BOOM ft. Snoop Dogg, by enlisting the creative talents of Sawe under the direction of Tomás Peña to create a genius animated video. With hip beats and Snoop Dogg’s badass tones, the narrative sees a cheeky hoodlum, an old floppily-jowled man and a rotund police officer battling against each other, driven by their desire to be graffiti artists.

  12. List

    Animator and director Tom Jobbins has just been signed to Pulse Films where his first assignment was a video for Tune-Yards’ latest single Real Thing. Never one for subtlety in her promotional films, Tune-Yards’ Merril Garbus already has a roster of punchy, colour-saturated films to her name, so Tom was tasked with creating something that stood up to its predecessors in vibrance and impact, as well as keeping things fresh to move things on for the new album.

  13. List

    A few years back illustrator Rob Hunter produced his debut graphic novel The New Ghost, a story about a novice spirit befriending a troubled astronomer. It was a simple, ethereal tale that left no doubt in our minds that Rob was a burgeoning talent in the comics scene. It obviously made an impact on electronic musician Jon Hopkins too, as he’s just commissioned Rob to lend his illustration skills – and his lonely ghost – to his latest EP Asleep Versions. The two make a fitting pair with Jon’s ambient compositions mixing seamlessly with Rob’s subtle, other-wordly imagery. To top it all off they’ve just released this snappy teaser too, in which animator Sean Weston has brought the ghost to life – a truly breathtaking achievement.