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    HOLO: Issue 1

Publication

Publication: Issue I of HOLO is a magnificent exploration of the hyper-connected present

Posted by Madeleine Morley,

The first issue of HOLO has arrived, tele-beamed straight from the not so distant future, and it’s a fantastic document of all things manifest in the post-machine age. The magazine is an intriguing blend of various editorial formats, striking images, curious interviews and carefully curated content, and it plots a detailed and fascinating trajectory into a future that, whilst reading the magazine, you begin to realise is already with us.

Focusing on the artists and creators at the forefront of the hyper-connected, ever accelerating present, the first issue of HOLO examines the realm of the digital, a world that is speedily becoming what the editors describe as “The New Normal.” HOLO casts the net wide and interviews an incredible set of people: from the software artist Jer Thorb, whose orbiting graphs and galactic spreads challenge the usual way that we engage with quantitive information, to the architect Philip Beesley, whose alien landscapes seem to be spaces where the digital and the physical spectacularly collide.

Images of computer generated art are stunningly set along side images of the artists’ sat in their home or studio, an interesting juxtaposition that provides a tangible reality alongside the digital one. The magazine is highly immersive and bursting with intriguing perspectives, and seems to posit that tomorrow will always give us something new to think about.

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    HOLO: Issue 1

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    HOLO: Issue 1

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    HOLO: Issue 1

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    HOLO: Issue 1

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    HOLO: Issue 1

Oo-xtcya

Posted by Madeleine Morley

Madeleine joined It’s Nice That as a freelance editorial assistant in May 2014 having graduated from Cambridge University where she edited the student newspaper. In the autumn of 2014 she will begin her Masters course at The Courtauld Institute of Art where she will specialise in architecture.

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