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Illustration

Illustration: Cheeky classical sculptures and severed hands in the portfolio of Sara Andreasson

Posted by James Cartwright,

Sara Andreasson is about as multidisciplinary as creatives come. She’s a designer hailing from Wermland in Sweden who has seemingly made a conscious decision not to specialise in any one area. Equally adept at fashioning furniture from extraordinary materials as she is at illustrating exuberant images of altered classical sculptures and abstract digital images, it would be fair to say that Sara’s portfolio is a mixed bag of projects. But the consistent element at the heart of all of them is her attention to detail. Whether sketching portraits in soft graphite or taking still-life photographs of taxidermy birds she’s certain to craft each piece with care, displaying the talents of an expert despite clearly being a jack of all trades.

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    Sara Andreasson: Untitled

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    Sara Andreasson: Untitled

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

Most Recent: Illustration View Archive

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