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    Big Bear

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    Dungeness Drawings

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    Dungeness Drawings

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    Dungeness Drawings

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    Dungeness Drawings

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    Dungeness Drawings

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Human (adj.)

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    Portraits

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    Portraits

Illustration

The Graduates 2011: Sarah Maycock

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

After a “tough two years” at a boy’s grammar school and one more in Brighton City College, Sarah Maycock arrived at Kingston University to study Illustration and Animation. Her work, with its painterly details and canny knack for character, is an excellent amalgamation of her meanderings between the fine art and illustration studios back in Brighton, and a very special ability for obsessive mark making “mixed with total order.”

Kingston posed her the opportunity to “take charge of my artist’s temperament with some nice shiny briefs.” And she certainly channelled that nature into quite a number fascinating projects. Examples being a book of Dungeness drawings and some accomplished sketchbooks showing her to be a quick and able reportage illustrator, while a book on animal similes reveal an extraordinary explanatory power to the hasty lines and use of colour. Lovely stuff.

If your portfolio was on fire, and you could only save one piece/project, which would you choose, and why?

It’s too big to fit in my actual portfolio, but it would have to be the Bear painting I made for my final exhibition. I stood/sat/lay/crawled on the paper to paint him, so he and I are quite intimate now.

If you could collaborate with another artist/designer (or a number of artists/designers) to make a piece of work, who would you work with and what would you make?

I don’t know if this is a project as such, but I would love to play the drawing game, “Consequences” with Hieronymus Bosch, Egon Schiele, Thom Yorke, and Henri Matisse (to name a few, this list changes every time I try to think about it). The quality of drawing, conceptual thinking and surreal imagination would be mind blowingly inspirational. All condensed into folded drawings of figures. And maybe Denys Fisher (the man who invented Spirograph) so we could make an incredible painting machine.

What was your finest moment at art school?

Three come to mind. I was recently invited to Ken Garland’s studio, that was brilliant. Or the end of year show at the Red Gallery. It felt like my first “real” thing. I worked with several others on the identity, which was a huge responsibility, but such a good experience. I think it’s given me a taste for art direction. Oh, I also invented the term “tug of war seesaw” and used it in the conclusion of my dissertation.

We believe it was the Jonas brothers who once said “we’re the kids of the future.” How, if at all, do you relate to that?

I don’t feel like a kid anymore, I think I have aged about twenty years in the last six weeks or so. As for relating to the Jonas Brothers, I’d rather not. I have a real thing about men who look like they preen their eyebrows more than I do.

Can you give us ONE prediction about you and your work for the next year?

I will move home for a little while and work in the local pub, which will be a reminder that the world doesn’t (always) revolve around paper gsm and colour space and pagination, all the while exploring my interest in portraiture and paint.

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Illustration View Archive

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    Alright, we admit it – Peter Judson has made a lot of work we’ve been really into this year, and he’s had the props on the site to prove it. But why should we be made to contain ourselves when he keeps producing illustration of this calibre? Why, we ask you?

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    If, like me, you spent many an hour in your teenage years gazing absentmindedly at Larry Carlson’s experimental website Medijate, you’ll no doubt be similarly transfixed by The Landfill from the very talented Santtu Mustonen. Stitching together a “collection of unused sketches, leftover drawings and rejected ideas from forgotten projects” to a mesmerising soundtrack by Tuomas Alatalo, Santtu created a hypnotic animation that’s a work of art in its own right.

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    As the man who gave form to the twisted genius of Hunter S. Thompson, British illustrator’s Ralph Steadman’s latest project seems like a perfect fit. Ralph has worked with Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan to illustrate some limited-edition Blu-Ray covers for a special boxset of the series due out early next year.

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    Having just re-read Sammy Harkham’s 2012 anthology of short stories Everything Together I was stupidly excited to find out he’s just got himself on Tumblr and uploaded a small but growing archive of work both old and new. Included in among old covers of Kramers Ergot, book jackets for Kafka anthologies, Bonnie Prince Billy album covers and bits and pieces of rejected work are original drawings from his ongoing graphic novel (and surely future masterpiece) Blood of the Virgin, which he’s also selling to fund further work on the project. I for one cannot wait to see this project massive volume finally realised. Keep at it Sammy!

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    This top image by New York-based illustrator Karan Singh caught my eye on purely aesthetic grounds; it was only when I delved a little deeper that I discovered the interesting story behind the work. Karan was one of several artists commissioned by Ogilvy New York to work on the IBM US Open Sessions, whereby LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy created a series of tracks based on data gathered at the tennis tournament.

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    I came across the work of Matthias Geisler over on Booooooom the other day and was reminded that we hadn’t posted something like this in a while. Matthias’ work is a swirling blend of spirits and creatures that are created with meticulous use of pencil crayons and water-colours. Is it me or are watercolours real in at the moment? All the cool kids seem to be using them.

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    If you’re feeling a bit bleary eyed this morning, grab a cup of coffee and take a look at Goncalo Viana’s beautiful illustrations to wake yourself up. Rich with colour and charming detail his work has a wonderful texture to it, as though you could reach out and actually feel the deep pigments he’s used.

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    Before I write anything about illustrator Nicolas Delort I feel like full disclosure is necessary; between the ages of 11 and 14 I spent all of my pocket money collecting and painting Warhammer models and most of my saturdays hanging out in Games Workshop, which means I’m predisposed to LOVE epic fantasy artwork, like Frank Fazetta, Julie Bell and Boris Vallejo.

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    It’s comforting to see the resurgence in the physical aspects of music. There was a moment a few years back when gig posters and witty, well-crafted promotional material seemed to be confined solely to the world wide web, which made every poster that was actually printed on paper something of a novelty. Not any more though: we’re receiving and finding so many illustrators now whose portfolios are chock full of variations on the humble gig poster and they are brilliant. Today we thought we’d champion this theme with Dutch illustration student Douwe Dijkstra. His visual interpretations of bands such as The Growlers and Losers are taking the stylistic qualities of early 1990s gig posters and infusing them with a modern style to make some seriously nick-able printed matter. Keep up the great work, Douwe!

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    On the morning that David Cameron is giving a press conference on the UK’s future role in Afghanistan, Scott King’s latest book seems even more significant. Anish & Antony Take Afghanistan is a graphic novel that Scott sees as “a critique of the deployment of public art,” which satirises how far we’re prepared to enforce our cultural values on others. Through Scott’s writing and Will Henry’s illustrations, we follow as Anish (Kapoor) and Antony (Gormley) try and bring cultural regeneration to the war-torn country.

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    The London-based French illustrator Malika Favre has had another big year, adding even more breadth to her already impressive portfolio of work. In the summer she was invited to Tenerife by a Spanish design collective called 28ymedio to take part in its Illustrated Journey project, which aims to “help fight the economic crisis in Spain by promoting the Canary Islands and bringing a new stream of tourism.”

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    You can do a lot in a year, I’m told, and proof if any was needed comes in the form of Cynthia Kittler. Just last year we listed her as one of our Students of the Month for her “kind, quiet illustration,” and checking by her website again this year I found that not only is she no longer a student, but she’s being regularly commissioned by the likes of The New York Times and Die Zeit magazine for editorial illustration which is not only as quiet and kind as it was last time we checked in, but also incredibly resonant now.

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    In Dayoung Cho’s illustrated world, it’s the Goblin Olympics and the bunny’s on top. Tumbling top-to-tail with the tiger, it’s cheered on by an amorphous cyclops whilst a duck-billed platypus and rhino await their turn in the ring.