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    11 out of 10

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    11 out of 10

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    The One Weekend Book Series

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    The One Weekend Book Series

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    The One Weekend Book Series

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    The One Weekend Book Series

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    Der Greif

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    Der Greif

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    Der Greif

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    Der Greif

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    The Human Printer

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    The Human Printer

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    The Human Printer

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    The Human Printer

  • No_1

    No. #3, #4 and #5 zine

  • No_2

    No. #3, #4 and #5 zine

  • No_3

    No. #3, #4 and #5 zine

  • No_4

    No. #3, #4 and #5 zine

Illustration

Things

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

Seriously good stuff this week. The Human Printer present their process secrets, The One Weekend Book Series go to Paris, Der Greif publish a story filled third issue, “all is number” with No.Zine who sent us three, four and five and finally, Raw Design make good at least one of their resolutions to “make things better” with a nice letter pressed poster. Cmd-colon, cmd-zero, people.

No. zines Patrick Fry

A spectrum of talented contributers (how’s about Benbo George, Michael Willis, Colin Henderson, Zoe Barker for starters?) plus Patrick Fry, of course, with his multi talents for curation, design, illustration and art-direction makes No. zines a happy thing. Independent art zines are not uncommon, but the attention to quality design, stock and finish plus the sheer variety of contributers make No. zine better than most.
www.nozine.com

The One Weekend Book Series. Volume Ten / January 2009 M.Lorenz, Antoine + Manuel

The premise is this – “each issue M. Lorenz and a Guest Artist are given 48 hours to experience a city, document it and create a visual diary without the use of computers”. What they made is a dreamy (fever induced, I believe) and personal record of Paris, “an exhibitionistic view of the personal state” in a sequential series of abstract washes and collated details. The cover has excellent gold foil stamping and I enjoyed the pantone blue of it all. Really nicely put together with considered design work by Two Points.
www.theoneweekendbookseries.com
www.twopoints.net

Der Greif Design by Simon Karlstetter, Leon Kirchlechner and Felix von Scheffer

Or, The Grab is a truly excellent photography magazine in the way that it conciously picks and places images that appear to tell their own stories with appropriate form, design additions and not a little intrigue. Some works deserve honorable mention like Ophelia by Ian Dunn (I think…) , a superfluous photo of a dress that appears as if submerged and Dominique Müller-Grote. The cover is also excellent.
www.dergreif-online.de

The Human Printer Book Design by Louise Naunton Morgan

An interesting process book documenting the staggering human printer by Louise Naunton Morgan. A limited run, this risographed and manually compiled book is like a happy after thought of a genuinely engaging process. Page 23 is my favourite. You get to “meet” the “printers” and take note of effectual character traits like ‘steady and reliable’ 01-Tubbs, she can be on my team.
www.thehumanprinter.org
www.hatopress.net

10 out of 11 Raw Design

“Millions of us make New Year resolutions in order to make the impending year a success – this poster hopes to offer some inspiration to make 2011, 11 out of 10.”. Letterpressed sentiments-come-resolutions make this two colour poster an exellent antidote to the new year’s inevitable Fail list. Quality as ever from Raw who know the worth of a good bit of print.
www.rawdesignstudio.co.uk

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Illustration View Archive

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    Joan Cornellà is nothing short of a master of his form. He’s got the gruesome comic strip down to a fine art, creating complex and hilarious narratives and then expressing them in no more than six bright panels, from one man with a poo on his head googling “who loves me?” and being given the answer “nobody,” to another man riding a bicycle made out of a suffering friend.

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    Wild Beasts frontman Hayden Thorpe vividly remembers coming across Mattis Dovier’s work. The band had been approached to take part in The Jameson Works, a project which focuses on how creativity happens and the insights and stories picked up along the way that are as much a part of the creative process as the final outcome. Searching for some reference material, Hayden came onto It’s Nice That and saw this post of Mattis’ GIFs. “It was pretty confrontational,” he remembers. “You could see Mattis’ hand behind the work and that reflects the way we now work too.”

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    There’s something delightfully scientific about Erik Söderberg’s GIFs, however firmly I remind yourself that they’re composed of thousands of pixels. The repetitive way they pulsate and fizz quietly on the screen takes me right back to double Biology on a Thursday morning, watching in shellshocked fascination as tiny living cells mutate on a tiny strip of glass under a microscope, and grandly imagining myself to be the second coming of Louis Pasteur.

  4. List

    I love peering into people’s sketchbooks. There’s so much more honesty in an image that’s been hurriedly scribbled down on a station platform than in one which has been perfected over the course of several drafts, and I’m a sucker for that kind of insight into an artist’s process. I like to see the mistakes, the rubbings out and the development as well as the final work.

  5. List

    I came across Assa Ariyoshi’s work while perusing the latest issue of Mood Magazine where it brought alive a feature on the weird and wonderful world of Icelandic cuisine. I love the way how in this surreal dinner party scene the shark looks like he’s drunkenly ranting at the puffin. We’ve all been on both sides of this I’d wager.

  6. List-176-holidays

    Jean-Jacques Sempé has something of a varied CV. Having been expelled from school, he went on to become a door-to-door tooth powder salesman, a soldier and a comic book artist, before going on to creating some rather iconic covers for The New Yorker and cartoons for Paris Match.

  7. New-list

    If our interview with Brown Cardigan as part of our feature on to digital publishing has taught us anything, it’s that you shouldn’t underestimate the power of a GIF. Introducing then Japanese illustrator Nimura Daisuke, who has perfected the art with some of the sweetest, rudest moving images we’ve ever seen. How could you not fall for a shot of a woman flashing at a grumpy man as he looks the other way, or an unfortunate schoolboy leaning over and having the full conents of his rucksack crashing to the floor?

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    Kevin McNamee-Tweed by name, twee by nature, I’d assumed, casting an eye over these sweetly, naively sketched wee pictures of books. Then I read the titles. One contained the word “shart.” Another proclaims, “It’s Only Your Fault: How to Help Yourself”, while a more philosophical tome proffers the question “who is….BIRD HUMAN?”

  9. List

    Jean Jullien is many things. Artist. Illustrator. French. Recent emigre to New York. It’s Nice That favourite. So hot right now. He’s also the final artist to have a show at Kemistry Gallery’s current east London home before it closes its doors early next year (although as has been reported it has some excitingly ambitious plans).

  10. List-2

    A couple of weeks back a parcel containing the newest issue of The Pendulum made its way through our door, leading us haphazardly but happily to the website of its creator, Liana Jegers. Chicago-based artist Liana is an illustrator as well as a co-ordinator of printed imagery, and her Tumblr is full of snippets of sketches in progress which stand up admirably on their own.

  11. List

    Last week the third issue of Danielle Pender’s Riposte magazine was launched and after she and designer Shaz Madani set such a high bar with the first two issues, we were interested to see how they’d followed up their previous success. The early indications are very good. Although we haven’t seen a copy in the flesh we have had a sneak peek at some of the content and once again the title’s smart curatorial approach is very much in evidence.

  12. List

    German illustrator Nadine Redlich just keeps going from strength to strength, her catalogue of exuberant characters growing day by day. Though there’s no doubt at all that Nadine’s masterful at creating truly cheerful chappies, there’s a growing number of creatures in her portfolio who look like they’re ready to hibernate for winter, staring out at you blankly as though they wish they’d been left to sleep. Of course there’s also the belligerent mountain, the cherry at the end of its tether and that creepy fellow with the giant aubergine who I can’t help but find menacing, resulting in an altogether impressive cast of characters in a portfolio we can’t get enough of. If you want even more, Nadine’s got a comic out with Rotopol Press that you can get your hands on here. Now, back to enjoying that dog on the chair…

  13. List-tatiana-bruni_-the-drunkard_-costume-design-for-%e2%80%98the-bolt%e2%80%99_-1931_-courtesy-grad-and-st-petersburg-museum-of-theatre-and-music

    We’re no ballet aficionados, but we wouldn’t usually associate drunkards, typists and factory workers with the grace and poise of the discipline. However, as these beautiful gouache painting by Tatiana Bruni show, there’s much more to ballet than tutus and swan lake, with her angular figures, bold colours and sometimes grotesquely postured characters. The paintings show costume designs for Dmitri Shostakovich’s 1931 ballet The Bolt, and are going on show at London’s Gallery for Russian Arts and Design alongside a series of period photographs. The ballet itself was bold and striking in its use of real hammers, machine-inspired choreography, aerobics and acrobatics, and the costume images are equally as dynamic, inspired by “the aesthetics of agit-theatre and artist-designed propaganda posters”, according to the gallery. The sense of movement is palpable, whether in the graceful billowing dresses or the staggering legs of our brightly-coloured drunkard, working against the geometric rigidity of the style to beautiful effect.