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    Tomorrow Machine: Expanding Bowl

Behind The Scenes

Meet Tomorrow Machine, the studio doing mind-blowing things with food packaging

Posted by Maisie Skidmore,

In a world where everything is in a perpetual state of flux, from the way you brush your teeth to the fastenings on your shoes, food packaging has stayed more or less the same. Sure, the crisp packets have gotten a bit fancier and pricey organic veg comes in marginally more environmentally friendly materials now, but on the whole food has been left far behind the crowd in terms of progression.

Meet Tomorrow Machine, the Swedish product design studio giving it a encouraging shove. Their ideas are so innovative that it’s almost difficult to believe they’re real; from packaging which perishes as the food it contains does, as in This Too Shall Pass, to plant pots that eliminate the need for watering, self-cleaning plates that actually work and food packaging that opens in the oven when the food inside it is ready to eat.

Founded on a meticulous understanding of science and a desire for sustainability and matched with an equally impressive aesthetic, we thought it was time we spoke to Hanna Billqvist and Anna Glansén of the studio to find out exactly what they do.

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    Tomorrow Machine: Microgarden Growing Kit

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    Tomorrow Machine: Microgarden Growing Kit

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    Tomorrow Machine: Microgarden Growing Kit

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    Tomorrow Machine: Microgarden Growing Kit

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    Tomorrow Machine: Microgarden Growing Kit

Who are you, and how did Tomorrow Machine come into being?

Myself and Anna Glansén started Tomorrow Machine almost two years ago. We are both product designers and met during our studies in Stockholm, at Beckmans college of Design.  We soon discovered that we share the same thoughts about design, and we both believe that design can and will play an important part in shaping a sustainable world for the future.

What are the driving forces behind what you do?

Our main focus is always to create innovative design that are good for people and good for the environment, in everything that we do, but to do it in a way that is fun and exciting.

What’s your favourite project and why?

Our favourite project is This Too Shall Pass because it describes us, and what we want to achieve in every project, perfectly. That sustainable design/packaging doesn’t have to be a drab grey carton box, but can be colourful, smart and engaging.

Find out more about Tomorrow Machine’s work over on their website!

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    Tomorrow Machine: Expanding Bowl

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    Tomorrow Machine: Expanding Bowl

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    Tomorrow Machine: Expanding Bowl

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    Tomorrow Machine: Ekoportal

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    Tomorrow Machine: Ekoportal

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Raspberry Smoothie

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Raspberry Smoothie

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Raspberry Smoothie

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Basmati Rice

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Basmati Rice

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Basmati Rice

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Olive Oil

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Olive Oil

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Olive Oil

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    Tomorrow Machine: This Too Shall Pass: Olive Oil

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    Tomorrow Machine: Self-Opening Package

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    Tomorrow Machine: Self-Opening Package

Ms-300

Posted by Maisie Skidmore

Assistant Editor Maisie joined It’s Nice That fresh out of university in the summer of 2013 and has stayed with us ever since. She has a particular interest in art, fashion and photography and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast. She also oversees our London listings guide This At There.

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